Intersession Programs at Johns Hopkins
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* Below is a list of courses intended to be offered for Intersession 2016. This list will be updated periodically especially to add new courses, so be sure to check back for the latest updates before you submit your course shopping cart in ISIS!

Africana Studies

Black to the Future: Intro to Afrofuturism

Exploring the work of artists and scholars such as Octavia Butler, Samuel Delaney, Richard Iton, Alondra Nelson, Mark Dery, Janelle Monae, George Clinton, and OutKast, this course introduces students to the aesthetic of Afrofuturism, which uses elements of science fiction, fantasy and non-Western cosmologies to both critique the present-day dilemmas of Black people and re-examine historical events of the past.

Course Number: AS.362.108.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/15/2016
Times:  M - 1:00-3:30PM | W- 1:00-3:30PM | Th- 1:00-3:30PM
Instructor: Bryan Carter
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Anthropology

Anthropology of Sound

This course explores recent discussions on the possibilities of sound to challenge and expand conventional methods used in the humanities, contemporary social research, and the natural sciences. Drawing from a range of philosophical, historical, psychoanalytic, linguistic, anthropological, artistic, and scientific sources; students will discuss the ways sound has been historically experienced, represented, produced, classified, cancelled, and circulated in different parts of the world. These topics will be examined through reading assignments, listening sessions, and weekly sound recording assignments.

Course Number: AS.070.104.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/11/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 1:00-4:15pm | Th- 1:00-4:15pm
Instructor: Gustavo Valdivia
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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When Anthropology Looks at Sports

How can anthropology engage sports? With its qualitative method and distinctive approaches to social theory can anthropology expand the frame of what we think happens when sports are played? Does sports shift how we perceive the body-mind relationship? Asking these questions offers an opportunity to examine our own relation to sports as either a participant or fan. In our anthropological discussions of sports we will encounter overlapping topics that include race, nationalism, colonialism, ethics, and Christianity.

Course Number: AS.070.110.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/11/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 9am-12:15pm | Th- 9am-12:15pm
Instructor: Thomas Thornton
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Selling Muslim Pop Music in Pakistan

Pakistan is famous for its Sufi Muslim saints and their mystical poetry, rendered in folk, classical and popular genres. Recently a new wave of musicians have come to be widely distributed through new markets and media to urban audiences who seek to recover their folk heritage. The musical television program Coke Studio has been particularly influential. Reading poetry, translations, interviews of performers and scholarly literature, and listening to a wide range of Sufi music, we will examine the tensions of tradition/modernity, rural/urban, and folk/global, in the production and marketization of Pakistani popular culture.

Course Number: AS.070.115.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/15/2016
Times:  M - 10:00-12:15PM | W- 10:00-12:15PM | F- 10:00-12:15PM
Instructor: Ghazal Asif
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Tibet in Exile: Life and Teachings of the Dalai Lama

This course explores the history of Tibet through the nature of political and spiritual rule that has governed it since 1642: the institution of Dalai Lama. Through films, popular press, and the philosophical and spiritual writings of the now living 14th Dalai Lama, we will understand the multiple meanings that this figure consolidates, as a teacher, a spiritual guide, and a political leader who embodies the hope for the existence of a future Tibet.

Course Number: AS.070.121.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 3:00pm-5:15pm | W- 3:00pm-5:15pm | Th- 3:00pm-5:15pm | F- 3:00pm-5:15pm
Instructors: Andrew Brandel and Swayam Bagaria
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Applied Math and Statistics

A Hands-On Introduction to Matlab

This is an introductory course in programming MATLAB for students in the mathematical sciences. MATLAB is widely used in research and industry for numerical calculations, plotting of functions and data, and the creation of user interfaces. Short tutorial lectures will be followed by problem solving sessions. Topics emphasized will be basic programming in the MATLAB environment and the practical solution of problems in matrix calculations, differential equations, signal, and image processing, and machine learning.

Course Number: EN.550.282.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: Q
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 1:00-3:30 PM | Th- 1:00-3:30 PM
Instructor: Tianyu Ding
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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A Hands-On Introduction to Matlab

This is an introductory course in programming MATLAB for students in the mathematical sciences. MATLAB is widely used in research and industry for numerical calculations, plotting of functions and data, and the creation of user interfaces. Short tutorial lectures will be followed by problem solving sessions. Topics emphasized will be basic programming in the MATLAB environment and the practical solution of problems in matrix calculations, differential equations, signal, and image processing, and machine learning.

Course Number: EN.550.282.14
Credits: 1
Distribution: Q
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 4:00-6:30PM | Th- 4:00-6:30PM
Instructor: Tianyu Ding
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Introduction to R

This is an introductory course in R for both undergraduate and graduate students. R is a programming language and software environment that provides a wide variety of statistical and graphical techniques, including linear and nonlinear modeling, classical statistical tests, time-series analysis, etc. We will discuss data structures, data entry and manipulation, graphical procedures, statistical models, and programming in R. No previous programming experience is required.

Course Number: EN.550.283.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: Q
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  W- 1:00-3:30PM | F- 1:00-3:30PM
Instructor: Tobi Bosede
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Introduction to Scientific Programming in Python

This is an introductory course in programming python for students in the mathematical sciences. Short tutorial lectures will be followed by problem solving sessions. Topics emphasized will include linear algebra problems, ordinary differential equations and optimization. Also a particular interest will be given to practical machine learning problems (classification, regression and clustering).

Course Number: EN.550.285.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: Q
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  W- 10:00-12:30PM | F- 10:00-12:30PM
Instructor: Kamel Lahouel
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Art

The Art of Infrastructure

Networks of infrastructure surround us: invisible, pervasive, and essential modern life. Our project in this course will be to begin to see the arcane complexities that underlie our simplest acts (as well as the highest ambitions of architects and civil engineers). We will eat, to learn about the infrastructures of food; we will travel, to learn about routes; we will explore water and power and the myriad of dependencies that make things tick. Then we will make (beautiful) maps.

Course Number: AS.371.175.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: H E
Days:  Monday 1/11/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 1:00-4:15PM | Th- 1:00-4:15PM
Instructor: Charles Phinney
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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B'More: Seeing Baltimore with a Camera - Beyond Tourism

Please note, class will meet Saturday, Jan. 23 in the event of inclement weather. This course is for freshmen ONLY. This course will be an introduction to various neighborhoods of Baltimore through the eye of a camera. Students will be introduced to the concept of photography as an artistic medium for documenting a city's cultural life (e.g. architectural, musical, social, historical) through a mixture of classroom lectures and field trips to Baltimore neighborhoods: Federal Hill, Hampden, Mt. Vernon and Fells Point and visits to the Peabody Library, the Walters Art Museum, SPCA and a photo studio. Each student will create a small body of work that reflects their interests, point of view and photographic skills.

Course Number: AS.371.188.33
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/18/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 10:00-4:30PM | W- 10:00-4:30PM | Th- 10:00-4:30PM | F- 10:00-4:30PM
Instructor: Howard Ehrenfeld
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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B'More: Charm City Thru the Lens

Please note, class will meet Saturday, Jan. 23 in the event of inclement weather. This course is for freshmen ONLY. In this course we'll analyze and discuss the work of master photographers from Baltimore and beyond. Students will be introduced to the concept of photography as an aesthetic medium for documenting a city's cultural life. We will also discuss the intersection between camera basics (e.g. ISO, aperture, shutter speed) and visual perception and cognition. Classroom lectures will be complemented by visits to Federal Hill, Fells Point, Bolton Hill, and Mt. Vernon. Using their own digital and cell phone cameras, students will have the opportunity to create their own photographic portfolios or short films to present to the class.

Course Number: AS.371.189.33
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/18/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 10:00-4:30PM | W- 10:00-4:30PM | Th- 10:00-4:30PM | F- 10:00-4:30PM
Instructor: Monica Lopez-Gonzalez
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Biology

Vaccines: Past, Present, and Future

An overview of the history of vaccines, their current use, and future directions in vaccine development. Issues regarding vaccine discovery and testing, regulation, and impact on public health will be discussed. The course is intended to be accessible to non-biological science majors; humanities and engineering students are welcome and encouraged to enroll.

Course Number: AS.020.170.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/15/2016
Times:  M - 6:30-9:30PM | W- 6:30-9:30PM
Instructor: Lewis Schrager
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Biology and Medicine in Four Dimensions

Biology and life occur in three-dimensions (3D), not in a two-dimensional culture dish. This course explores how the world of biology and medicine changes in 3D over time (4D). We will explore recent scientific advancements in the field of whole-organ culture, both through in vitro and in vivo imaging. It highlights groundbreaking experiments that ignited the field, recent work, and future applications. Course is highly interactive, emphasizing student involvement in understanding fundamental questions and the techniques used by scientists and physicians. Connections to human health and disease are emphasized. Course includes lectures, readings, student presentations, plus guest lectures by professors involved in the scientific advancements. Grades determined by class participation, attendance, quizzes, and oral presentation.

Course Number: AS.020.173.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/11/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 1:00-3:45PM | W- 1:00-3:45PM | F- 1:00-3:45PM
Instructors: Neil Neumann and Dan Hossamov Georgess
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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High-throughput Sequencing in Biology

This course will introduce students to high-throughput sequencing and its impact on biological research. At the end of the course students should be familiar with the various HTS techniques and how to use them for a project of their interest. They will also gain a clear understanding of the work flow involved and be familiar with commonly used bioinformatic tools.. The course will include both class room instruction and lab work (both wet lab and computer lab). The topics that will be covered include: High-throughput sequencing(HTS) technology - An introduction to the various technologies available, how they work, and the pros and cons for each of the current HTS technologies; A look at some of the most interesting/informative assays developed using HTS technology; Basics of command-line(unix) and the use of bioinformatic tools to analyze HTS data sets; An introduction to some well-established bioinformatic pipelines and; Critical evaluation and validation of results from HTS.

Course Number: AS.020.174.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 1:00-3:15PM | Th- 1:00-3:15PM
Instructor: Vidya Balagopal
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Cancer Ecology

Why is cancer a major cause of death worldwide? Why cancer cells spread to a distant organ ("metastasis") remains unknown. Applying established principles from other fields of biology might provide a deeper understanding of the metastatic process to solve the "cancer problem." In this course, we will we will explore ecological paradigms (invasive species, migration patterns, ecosystem collapse, pollution) to understand the steps of lethal metastasis and to identify possible strategies to improve patient survival. Students should have had at least one course in biology (general, cell biology, evolution, or ecology) already.

Course Number: AS.020.175.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 10:00-12:00PM | W- 10:00-12:00PM | F- 10:00-12:00PM
Instructor: Sarah Amend

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Introduction to Human Anatomy & Physiology

This class aims to provide background in anatomy and physiology to help students in their initial training in medical school. Lectures will cover the correlation between human anatomy and physiology using relevant clinical cases that exemplify the interconnections between anatomy and physiology in the physio-pathological context. The course is intended to provide students with a foundation for knowledge in the structures and processes relevant to medical science.

Course Number: AS.020.208.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 2:00-5:15PM | W- 2:00-5:15PM | F- 2:00-5:15PM
Instructors: Dorhyun Johng and Gonzalo Fernandez Torga
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Epigenetics in Development and Disease

Your DNA is not necessarily your destiny- life experiences alter modifications to DNA, which then change gene expression (defined as "epigenetics"). For example, how does a famine experienced by one generation affect the health of future generations? One mechanism is changes in DNA methylation, an epigenetic mark. In this course, we will explore epigenetic regulation in normal development as well as diseases including diabetes and cancer, and introduce new epigenetic drugs currently in clinical trials. Recommended Course Background: 2 semesters of biology, 1 semester organic chemistry.

Course Number: AS.020.220.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 8:30-10:30AM | W- 8:30-10:30AM | F- 8:30-10:30AM
Instructors: Katherine Chiappinelli and Christina DeStefano Shields
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Foreign Gene Expression Laboratory

This laboratory will introduce molecular cloning techniques that allow bacteria to be used to produce a particular gene product. Recombinant plasmids, carrying a fusion protein gene, will be constructed and used to transform competent E. coli, and the gene products isolated. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. The lab will meet 9 am to noon and 1-2 pm, Monday-Friday for the three weeks of intersession. Freshmen preferred. Biology majors given priority.

Course Number: AS.020.296.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 9:00-2:00PM | Tu- 9:00-2:00PM | W- 9:00-2:00PM | Th- 9:00-2:00PM | F- 9:00-2:00PM
Instructor: Robert Horner
Syllabus: Download (.doc)
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Biomedical Engineering

Intellectual Property Primer for Scientists and Engineers: Patents, Copyrights and Trademarks

The course will outline the basics of protection of IP for scientists and engineers. Most of the course will cover the basics of patent law, but introductions will also be given to trademarks and copyrights. Specific problems in the areas of biotechnology, computer science and the Internet will also be highlighted. It is hoped that the attendees will obtain a basic understanding of how intellectual property is protected. No prior legal background is required.

Course Number: EN.580.105.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/11/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 6:00-8:00PM | W- 6:00-8:00PM | Th- 6:00-8:00PM | F- 6:00-8:00PM
Instructor: Joerg-Uwe Szipl
Syllabus: Download (.doc)
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Immunoengineering: A New Frontier

What therapy could cure debilitating diseases such as cancer, HIV, allergies, diabetes, Alzheimers, or influenza? Engineers and Immunologists are attempting to create this with your body's own immune system. Understanding how these therapies work, how they might work in the future, and how to apply engineering principles to enhance these therapies will be the focus of this course.

Course Number: EN.580.107.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: E
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 10:00-11:45AM | W- 10:00-11:45AM | F- 10:00-11:45AM
Instructors: John Hickey and Alyssa Kosmides
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Introduction to Research Laboratory Skills

This course aims to familiarize first-year undergraduates with the basic lab skills necessary to work in a wet-lab. Specific skills covered will include pipetting, microscopy, PCR, gel electrophoresis, basic cell culture, simple microfluidics, and more! This hands-on experience will fully immerse students in the basics of laboratory research and should help prepare students looking for research or internship opportunities in the upcoming spring or summer semester.

Course Number: EN.580.117.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: N E
Days:  Monday 1/11/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 9:00-12:00PM | W- 9:00-12:00PM | F- 9:00-12:00PM
Instructor: Eileen Haase
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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The Heart: from Images to Models

This course aims to familiarize students with the state-of-the-art imaging and computational modeling of the heart and how they could be employed in the diagnosis and treatment of heart disease. An overview of cardiac anatomy and electrophysiology along with the fundamentals of image acquisition in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) will be provided. Special topics in cardiac MRI such as CINE, tagging, contrast enhancement and diffusion imaging will be discussed further. Students will then be familiarized with computer models of the heart and how they could be integrated with images to simulate electromechanical activity of the heart in patients. The course may involve hands-on experience with cardiac data.

Course Number: EN.580.205.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: N E
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 3:00-5:15PM | Th- 3:00-5:15PM
Instructor: Farhad Pashakhanloo
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Prometheus et al: the Ethics and Business of Regen Med

Primarily dealing with the process of recent advances in regenerative medicine, this course will focus on the interweaving of ethics, business, and science in recent issues and news (e.g. face transplants, Prop 71, FDA regulations, the stress-induced stem cell hoax, organ transplants, clinical trials of lab grown organs) and the practical applications of those interweavings on the students' future careers. The course will also cover the common ethical frameworks, emerging economic factors, and considerations of both donor consent and donor rights.

Course Number: EN.580.215.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: E S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 1:00-4:15PM | W- 1:00-4:15PM | F- 1:00-4:15PM
Instructor: Ethan Nyberg
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Introduction to Synthetic Biology

This course aims to make students familiar with the basic concepts in the field of synthetic biology. An overview of artificial and reengineered biological devices, perspectives, and ethical implications will be presented. Fundamental engineering principles of modularity, standardization, and abstraction hierarchy will be covered. The design of a subset of nucleic acid, protein-based devices as well artificial cells, tissues, and organisms will be discussed in further detail. Basic techniques used to engineer these synthetic systems will be presented. By the end of the course students will be asked to conceptualize the design of a device of their choice, and their strategy to build such a device.

Course Number: EN.580.216.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 9:00-11:15 AM | Th- 9:00-11:15AM
Instructor: Shiva Razavi
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Chemistry

Food Fermentation: Theory & Insight

This course will survey the biochemical, microbiological, and practical aspects of food fermentation in regard to beer, wine, cheese/yogurt, and fermented vegetable production. Focus will be on biochemical processes converting source material to finished product, establishment and role of microbial populations, practical considerations for desired trait/flavor development, and mitigation of undesired traits. Students will gain a fundamental understanding of food fermentation theory and technology. Basic knowledge of chemistry, biochemistry, and microbiology is advantageous.

Course Number: AS.030.300.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/11/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 1:00-3:15pm | W- 1:00-3:15pm | F- 1:00-3:15pm
Instructor: Benjamin Crane
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Civil Engineering

Computer Aided Drafting for Civil Engineers

This course presents a tutorial on engineering drafting using AutoCAD software. Students will have the opportunity to explore AutoCAD while learning the rules and terminology associated with drafting. A term project will allow students to apply their acquired skills to an engineering drawing of their choosing.

Course Number: EN.560.335.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: E
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Th- 9:00-11:15AM | F- 9:00-11:15AM
Instructor: Deniz Ayhan
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Classics

Gods, Heroes and Monsters:Mythology through the Visual Arts

From the battles of the Trojan War to the love affairs among the gods and mortals, the ancient Greeks and Romans depicted their favorite mythological episodes through visual representations. In this course, we will explore mythology through the medium of ancient art. We will use the iconography to investigate the significance of the ancient myths, which will be read in translation. Additionally, we will visit the Walters to examine the collection of mythological images in art.

Course Number: AS.040.144.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 10:30-12:15PM | W- 10:30-12:15PM | F- 10:30-12:15PM
Instructor: Adam Tabeling
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Mystery Cults in the Graeco-Roman World

Often characterized by secret initiation rites, ancient mystery cults shaped the religious landscape of ancient Greece and Rome. In this course, we will explore a selection of ancient mystery religions, including but not limited to the cults of Isis, Dionysus, and Demeter. Through an exploration of literary and archaeological sources crowned by a visit to the Walters Art Museum, we will try to unravel the social and cultural implications of these fascinating, yet “mysterious,” facets of ancient religion.

Course Number: AS.040.149.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 3:15-5:00PM | W- 3:15-5:00PM | F- 3:15-5:00PM
Instructor: Michele Asuni
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Classical Etymologies 2.0: The Latin Roots of English

Including the vocabulary of sciences and technology, about 90 percent of all English words have Greek or Latin roots. This course will explore the linguistic and historical connections between English and its classical origins. By studying the Latin roots of English, you will consolidate and expand your vocabulary, while also learning crucial skills to tackle the verbal section of most common standardized tests.

Course Number: AS.040.345.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H N
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 1:30-3:00PM | W- 1:30-3:00PM | F- 1:30-3:00PM
Instructor: Danilo Piana
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Computer Science

Introduction to Medical Imaging

This intersession class will provide an introduction to medical imaging. It will cover the following imaging modalities: X-ray, computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, photoacoustic, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The basic principles, instrumentation, and applications of each imaging modality will be presented. The course will include a mixture of lectures, classroom discussions, student presentations, and imaging demos using medical imaging resources at Hackerman Hall. Assignments will test theoretical knowledge and practical applications. Introductory physics, chemistry, and pre-calculus math are recommended pre-requisites. Note: Students should not expect an in depth analysis of medical imaging systems. This class is not intended as a substitute for Medical Imaging courses offered during fall and spring terms.

Course Number: EN.600.146.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: E
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 1:30-3:00PM | Th- 1:30-3:00PM | F- 1:30-3:00PM
Instructor: Muyinatu Bell
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Introduction to Connectomics

This course will introduce the emerging field of connectomics, and give students the opportunity to contribute directly to ongoing research efforts within the computer science department. This field enables novel brain circuit analysis at the ultrastructure level (i.e., individual synapses and neurons) and promises insight into areas such as biofidelic algorithms and the validation of the cortical column hypothesis first proposed at JHU by Vernon Mountcastle in the 1960s. We will begin by broadly surveying the field of brain mapping across different scales, and more deeply examine research in ultrastructure electron microscopy reconstruction efforts. Students will learn about scalable algorithms and approaches to extract graphs from large image volumes (O(100 TB+)), and the importance of computer science in addressing modern neuroscience challenges. Programming experience in MATLAB, Python or R is helpful but not required.

Course Number: EN.600.221.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: N E
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 2:45-6:00PM | Tu- 2:45-6:00PM | Th- 2:45-6:00PM
Instructor: William Gray Roncal
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Earth & Planetary Science

B'More: Cleaner, Greener, and Sustainable Baltimore: An Inside Look

Please note, class will meet Saturday, Jan. 23 in the event of inclement weather. This course is for freshmen ONLY. This course is designed to provide students with a strong understanding of the principles of sustainability, how they are applied at Johns Hopkins and in the City of Baltimore, and identify their role within the sustainability sphere. Topics covered include exploration of the fundamentals of sustainability, theory and application; how sustainability principles are embedded in operations in the City and at Hopkins; appreciation for the varieties of viewpoints and perspectives; and developing long-term strategies

Course Number: AS.271.119.33
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/18/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 10:00-4:30PM | W- 10:00-4:30PM | Th- 10:00-4:30PM | F- 10:00-4:30PM
Instructor: Ashley Pennington
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Economics

Seminar in Financial Literacy

The Seminar in Financial Literacy is a two-week seminar designed to introduce Hopkins undergraduates to the financial services industry. The goal is to provide an introduction to a variety of topics in finance, with a practical focus on exposing the students to employment options in the industry. The Seminar will consist of two weeks of lectures, delivered by distinguished Hopkins alumni, followed by a three-day trip to New York City during which we will visit various firms in the industry. By the end of the seminar, students should have developed an understanding of the structure and jargon of the financial services industry. Hence, they should be poised to profit from the firm visits and networking receptions that will take place on the trip to NYC.Application/Registration for Experiential Learning courses/trips must be processed at the Career Center, Garland Hall 3rd Floor. -REGISTER CAREER CENTER NOT ISIS-

Course Number: AS.180.104.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 10:00-4:00PM | Tu- 10:00-4:00PM | W- 10:00-4:00PM | Th- 10:00-4:00PM | F- 10:00-4:00PM
Instructor: Daniel Garcia

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The Marginal Revolution

This course aims to answer the question "Who, when and where do modern economic theories come from?" By looking at the innovative concept of "marginalism" developed by Walras, Jevons, and Menger in the 1870's, we can put contemporary ideas in an historical perspective as well as gain a richer understanding of today's economics discipline. The class uses both primary and secondary sources, and will be discussion oriented.

Course Number: AS.180.320.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 10:30-12:15PM | W- 10:30-12:15PM | F- 10:30-12:15PM
Instructor: Nicholas Johnson
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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English

Oscar Wilde

At once superficial and profound, artificial and authentic, Oscar Wilde's life and work are provocatively paradoxical. Reading his luminescent literary work, we'll discuss such topics as the aestheticist idea of life as fine art, the powers of wit, and the unexpected consequences of getting what you wish for. Readings: a selection of Wilde's plays, poems, essays, and fiction including a new, uncensored edition of his novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray. Requirements: rigorous in-class discussion and 5-6 pages of writing.

Course Number: AS.060.119.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 10:30-12:15PM | W- 10:30-12:15PM | F- 10:30-12:15PM
Instructor: Robert Day
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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The Ethnic Gangster in the American Cinema

In this intersession course we will consider the rise (and fall) of some of America's most notorious and beloved gangsters: Don Corleone (The Godfather), Henry Hill (GoodFellas), and Tony Montana (Scarface). With the help of short readings from Freud, Warshow, and Jameson, we consider what these films have to say about the difficulties and hopes of the immigrant experience, the codes of gangster morality, and the role of organized crime in the American imagination. And we will explore the interplay between domestic responsibility, male brotherhood, and violence that is the hallmark of the genre. Students will be asked to write a short paper at the conclusion of the term, and are required to view the movies outside of class time.

Course Number: AS.060.140.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 10:00-11:45AM | W- 10:00-11:45AM | F- 10:00-11:45AM
Instructor: Anthony Wexler
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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The Anti-hero: from Heathcliff to Walter White

Although it's common to think of literature a source of ethical wisdom, literary history is actually full of proud, often cynical, figures who lack respect for conventional norms and compel attention by their sheer force of will. This course constructs an abbreviated history of the anti-hero by exploring works of art that both privilege and criticize anti-heroic villains including Heathcliff (from Wuthering Heights), Mr. Hyde (from Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde), and Walter White (from Breaking Bad).

Course Number: AS.060.250.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 1:00-4:00PM | W- 1:00-4:00PM | F- 1:00-4:00PM
Instructor: Matt Flaherty
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Entrepreneurship & Management

Media & P.R. in the Big Apple

Gain insight into trends and career opportunities in public relations, advertising and media through one week of in-class learning (Jan. 4-8 half days) followed by a three-day trip to New York (Jan. 12-14) to network with and learn from executives from leading P.R., advertising and media firms.

Course Number: EN.660.150.12
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/15/2016
Times:  M - 10:00-3:00PM | Tu- 10:00-3:00PM | W- 10:00-3:00PM | Th- 10:00-3:00PM | F- 10:00-3:00PM
Instructor: Leslie Kendrick
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Sports Negotiation

Taught by a professional in the field, this course will provide an introduction to negotiation principles and explore various sports negotiations, including, but not limited to, player contracts, trades, and sponsorships. The course will be interactive and include several simulations.

Course Number: EN.660.157.11
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/8/2016
Times:  M - 3:30-6:00PM | Tu- 3:30-6:00PM | W- 3:30-6:00PM | Th- 3:30-6:00PM | F- 3:30-6:00PM
Instructor: Andres Lares
Syllabus: Download (.doc)
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Location, Location, Location

Taught by a professional in the field and a Hopkins graduate, this course explores the basic principles of real estate development and finance. A special feature for this year encourages student participation in the analysis and project selections of an internationally focused real estate impact investment fund in the global South.

Course Number: EN.660.160.21
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/11/2016 - Friday 1/15/2016
Times:  Tu- 2:30-5:45PM | W- 2:30-5:45PM | Th- 2:30-5:45PM | F- 2:30-5:45PM
Instructor: Jeremy Gorelick
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Leading Social Change - Community Based Learning

Learn the principles, values, and skills necessary to lead and succeed in organizations that make a positive difference in today's world. The course is designed to help students identify and provide opportunities to enhance their leadership skills. A "Blueprint for Success" will provide the framework for students to cultivate their own ideas for new socially conscious entrepreneurial ventures. The "Blueprint for Success" will culminate with a social entrepreneurial business plan competition where up to $5000 grants may be awarded to plans for start up costs associated with new initiatives designed to enhance the JHU and Baltimore City communities. Students can enroll in the course with predetermined social change initiatives in mind or develop new initiatives in the classroom setting.

Course Number: EN.660.240.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 9:30-1:00PM | W- 9:30-1:00PM | Th- 9:30-1:00PM
Instructor: William Smedick
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Film & Media Studies

The Stand-Up Comic in Society

Stand-up comics uniquely reflect their own collision of cultures, ideas, and preferences. In this class, students study and analyze influential comics, then create, workshop, and ultimately perform their own four-minute stand-up routine. In addition to classroom hours, this course includes a field trip to an open mic comedy show in Washington, DC on January 13 (students should reserve the time period from around 6:00 PM to midnight for this purpose). The class culminates in a required final performance in front of hundreds of students on the night of January 22 (7:00-10:00 PM). In addition to Tuesday and Friday evenings, the class will meet on Saturday mornings from 9:00 AM to noon.

Course Number: AS.061.146.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 7:45-10:45PM | F- 7:45-10:45PM
Instructor: Adam Ruben
Syllabus: Download (.doc)
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Fatal Women: The Femme Noire in Film Noir

The femme noire in film noir: "so appealing, so dangerous . ." An introduction to the basics of film analysis, with in-class screenings and emphasis on discussion over lecture. Students will keep daily film journals. No prior experience in film studies needed. Perfect attendance mandatory.

Course Number: AS.061.207.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/11/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 3:00-6:00PM | W- 3:00-6:00PM | F- 3:00-6:00PM
Instructor: Lucy Bucknell
Syllabus: Download (.doc)
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Narrative Filmmaking: Pre-Prod Bootcamp

Narrative Filmmaking: Pre-Production Boot Camp. January 4-15, Mon-Fri 10 am-4 pm; Weekend and evening screenings and workshops. 3 credits. This two-week boot camp for student filmmakers from JHU and the Maryland Institute, College of Art (MICA), provides intensive training in the crucial aspects of preparing to shoot a successful narrative film. A weeklong workshop with a professional screenwriter will allow students to hone and improve their existing screenplays, practice the elements of writing for film, and learn how to do a script breakdown. A second workshop on working with actors, taught by a professional actor, will teach students the ins and outs of casting and directing. Supplemental workshops will cover elements of pre-production such as budgets, production schedules, call sheets, and legal issues.

Course Number: AS.061.319.12
Credits: 3
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/15/2016
Times:  M - 10:00-4:00PM | Tu- 10:00-4:00PM | W- 10:00-4:00PM | Th- 10:00-4:00PM | F- 10:00-4:00PM
Instructor: Roberto Buso-Garcia
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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The Entertainment Industry in Contemporary Hollywood

This week-long course in Los Angeles gives students inside access to the entertainment industry through daily meetings and workshops with key figures in film, television, new media, and music, many of them JHU alums: directors, producers, screenwriters, studio executives, agents, exhibitors and more. We will visit studios, major agencies and production companies, and will end the week with a JHU networking event and panel discussion with alumni who work in film and television.The course runs from January 4 -8. Open to all Film and Media Studies majors and minors, with preference given to seniors. Students outside FMS may apply if slots remain open after all FMS students have registered.

Course Number: AS.061.377.60
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/8/2016
Times:  M - 9:00-4:00PM | Tu- 9:00-4:00PM | W- 9:00-4:00PM | Th- 9:00-4:00PM | F- 9:00-4:00PM
Instructor: Linda DeLibero
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Geography Environmental Engineering

Intro to Decision Analysis in Energy and Environment

This course will provide an overview of the methods used in decision analysis by using case studies from energy and environment. Decision modeling, uncertainty modeling and preference modeling will be introduced. Emphasis will be given on structuring decision problems, identifying and evaluating alternatives, constructing and solving decision trees, and utility theory. The class will be interactive and students will work in groups to apply the decision analysis techniques covered in the class.

Course Number: EN.570.397.31
Credits: 1
Distribution: Q E
Days:  Monday 1/18/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 1:00-4:15PM | W- 1:00-4:15PM | Th- 1:00-4:15PM | F- 1:00-4:15PM
Instructor: Venkat Prava
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Energy 101: Introduction to the Business and Policy of the US Energy Industry

This three-day intersession class will be a high-level overview of the US energy industry. We will focus on electricity, natural gas, oil, renewables and other forms of energy. We will discuss how each commodity is produced and traded from the perspective of the producer, the distributor, and the end user. The class will provide an overview of the technologies that convert energy into useful work, as well as the market and policy structures that influence investment in production, delivery, and consumption of electricity and natural gas. The goal is to provide a basis for further study, and to motivate students to consider a career in the industry. There are no prerequisites or textbooks, and the class is open to all. The course will be a mix of economics, basic engineering, financial mathematics, and sociology.

Course Number: EN.570.408.11
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/8/2016
Times:  M - 9:00-5:00PM | Tu- 9:00-5:00PM | W- 9:00-5:00PM
Instructors: Carl Liggio and David Yaffe
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Energy 102: Advanced Topics in Energy

This two-day intersession class will explore in detail the Oil and Wind industry. All facets of the oil industry will be covered from exploration and production transportation and refining to economics and trading. This section will end with a discussion of alternative and synthetic fuels. The wind section will cover the US wind industry including technologies, project development, and energy renewable energy policy. There are no prerequisites or textbooks, and the class is open to all. It is highly recommended to take Energy 101. Instructors are alumni from the industry.

Course Number: EN.570.409.11
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/8/2016
Times:  Th- 9:00-5:00PM | F- 9:00-5:00PM
Instructors: Carl Liggio and Bob Riley, Paul Schockett, Frank Shaw
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Energy 103: Financing a Sustainable World

This two-day intersession class will examine the role of financial markets as the world looks to shift to a more environmentally sustainable global system and fund the trillions of dollars of necessary to enable this shift. The class will begin with a brief overview of the capital markets, the current energy mix in the United States, and how new energy projects are evaluated and funded. Students will be asked to review, analyze and discuss investment opportunities focusing on key risks, economic return, and environmental impact. The goal of the course is to understand how the global financial market, one of man's most powerful tools, is currently financing change and how it can be more efficiently leveraged to address global environmental issues. There are no prerequisites or textbooks, and the class is open to all. Instructors are industry professionals focusing on sustainable project finance and impact investing.

Course Number: EN.570.410.21
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/11/2016 - Friday 1/15/2016
Times:  Th- 9:00-5:00PM | F- 9:00-5:00PM
Instructors: Carl Liggio and Jeff Eckel, Guy Van Syckle, Gabriel Thoumi
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Energy 104: Energy Finance, Trading and Risk Management

This two day intersession class will introduce basic financial risk management aspects of the energy business. The relationships between physical operations, weather-related risks, trading to hedge cash flows, collateral management, and capital structure of the corporation will be illustrated through a gas trading game. By using a participatory in-class game to introduce and reinforce concepts, students will gain an intuitive but realistic understanding of how corporate finance, trading, and physical energy operations are linked. We will avoid advanced mathematical techniques that are often associated with the subject. Students desiring a more in-depth treatment of energy commodities should take EN.550.653: Commodities and Commodity Markets. Recommended Course Background: EN.570.408.

Course Number: EN.570.413.31
Credits: 1
Distribution: E S
Days:  Monday 1/18/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 9:00-5:00PM | W- 9:00-5:00PM
Instructor: Gary Schultz
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Energy 105: Clean Energy Economics and Policy

Whether financing clean energy projects or setting policy, it is important to understand how different electricity sources can be compared. This intersession course economically compares renewable and energy efficiency investment options. Simple techniques for matching load with generation and clean technologies will be developed. Detailed life-cycle cost analysis will be prepared including uncertainty. Energy efficiency cost-effectiveness will be determined using basic cost tests and varying policy issues will be discussed. Avoided costs and operational impacts of renewable energy will be computed using different state requirements. The goal is to provide the basic computational and policy framework for determining the economics of a wide range of energy options and understand the limitation of various techniques. Students should bring a calculator or laptop computer.

Course Number: EN.570.414.31
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/18/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Th- 9:00-5:00PM | F- 9:00-5:00PM
Instructor: Cynthia Bothwell
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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German and Romance Languages and Literatures

Inverted Worlds: Topsy-Turvy Perspectives

This course will examine the concept of the inverted world in art, literature and philosophy. It will focus on the aesthetic forms and ideas most closely associated with the overturning of values. Satire and parody make a mockery of existing institutions and cultural norms. At the same time they claim to provide an insight into the modern human condition. Thus, in this course, we will analyze modernity adopting the lens of the inverted world in order to see what needs to be turned upside down in order to be right side up again.

Course Number: AS.211.225.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 10:00-12:30PM | W- 10:00-12:30PM
Instructor: Esther Edelmann
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Filming Change: French Society through Documentary

Since the 1960s, France went through radical changes that impacted all aspects of social life, such as race/class dynamics, union/workplace politics, gender relations, decolonization. Filmmakers, specifically through documentary genre, confronted with the complexity of contemporary events offering some of the most compelling accounts of them. This course will introduce students to the recent history of French documentary, focusing on the possibilities of this genre to reflect about social and historical change. Films by Rouch, Varda, Resnais, Marker, Depardon.

Course Number: AS.211.228.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 1:30-4:00PM | W- 1:30-4:00PM
Instructor: Cecilia Benaglia
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Taking Risks: Literature and Film

This course will explore concepts of risk in literary texts, philosophy, sociology, and film and discuss to what extend the effort to avoid risk generates knowledge and influences representations of the world. We will think of risk in the realm of accidents, abysses (of thought), and economy by constantly reflecting upon its use of rhetorical devices. Materials include: Henry James, Martin Heidegger, Friedrich Nietzsche, Franz Kafka, Georges Bataille, "The Wolf of Wall Street" and others.

Course Number: AS.211.271.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 10:00 -12:15PM | Th- 10:00 -12:15PM
Instructor: Nina Tolksdorf
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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The Culture of Italian Football

This course will use football (soccer, or calcio) as a key to understanding fundamental aspects of Italian culture and society. Through football, you will become familiar with the character of Italian cities, with their rivalries, and with their social and linguistic landscapes. We will explore dialects, different social classes, and immigration in Italy, all of which are reflected in the choice of supporting one football club or another. You will also study the use of football in Italian literature, cinema, and music as a metaphor for life, temporality, and for man's quest for happiness. By studying the connection between clubs/cities and the presence of football in Italian arts, you will understand the close relationship, which permeates all of Italian culture, between artistic expression and local identity. No knowledge of Italian is required, but this will be a chance to read Italian texts for those who can. However, everyone will learn some Italian words and expressions.

Course Number: AS.211.276.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 10:00-11:30AM | Th- 10:00-11:30AM | F- 10:00-11:30AM
Instructor: Francesco Brenna
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Fundamentals of Critical Theory

This course provides students with a foundation for as well as a brief introduction to Critical Theory. While paying close attention to the texts and the form in which they present themselves, we will explore major concepts such as dialectics, metaphysics, and freedom. Students will gain familiarity with historical works that have proven immensely influential in modern Europe and beyond, but will also be expected to consider ways in which such thinking has relevance for today's world.

Course Number: AS.213.319.22
Credits: 2
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/11/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 3:30-7:15PM | Tu- 3:30-7:15PM | Th- 3:30-7:15PM | F- 3:30-7:15PM
Instructor: Jason Yonover
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Love Stories in Italian Literature and Cinema

The topic of Love will guide us across Italian Literature and Cinema. We will analyze historical Loves and Lovers from the Middle Ages up to the present. We will examine how Love was talked about and portrayed, what Love was and what it has become. Love will help us to better understand Italy and Italy will maybe help us to better understand Love.

Course Number: AS.214.215.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 10:15-12:00PM | Tu- 10:15-12:00PM | Th- 10:15-12:00PM
Instructor: Lorenzo Filippo Bacchini
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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History

Baltimore in the Age of Revolution

This course will use Baltimore as a case study for investigating the intellectual, political, cultural, and demographic upheavals of what historians have termed the "Age of Revolutions." Through background lectures, group discussions, and field trips to historic sites, we will examine how the American, French, and Haitian revolutions reshaped the city and the lives of its inhabitants between 1763 and 1814. The field trip locations are both accessible, at no additional charge, by the Hopkins Shuttle and/or the Charm City Circulator.

Course Number: AS.100.278.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/15/2016
Times:  M - 1:00-3:30PM | Tu- 1:00-3:30PM | Th- 1:00-3:30PM
Instructor: Christopher Consolino
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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B'More: Business and the Black Community in Baltimore

Please note, class will meet Saturday, Jan. 23 in the event of inclement weather. This course is for freshmen ONLY.The image of a CVS pharmacy burning following protests is perhaps one of the most visual and memorable moments of the Baltimore uprising in April 2015. This course will examine the CVS burning as a starting point for exploring the relationship between business' broadly construed and Baltimore's black community. In doing so, it addresses critical questions about urban development, black entrepreneurship, and corporate social responsibility in the post-war era. This course will include field trips.

Course Number: AS.100.285.33
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/8/2016
Times:  Tu- 10:00-4:30PM | W- 10:00-4:30PM | Th- 10:00-4:30PM | F- 10:00-4:30PM
Instructor: Jessica Levy
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Criminality and Incarceration in U.S. History

This course will focus in particular on three key periods of prison development: the turn towards prison as industry during the Gilded Age; the period of "scientific treatment" in the early 20th century; and the post-World War II focus on the rehabilitative ideal. The course will then examine the failure of reform in the post-1965 period. The ways in which the American prison has contributed to regimes of racial control will be highlighted throughout.

Course Number: AS.100.290.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/15/2016
Times:  M - 3:45-6:15PM | W- 3:45-6:15PM | F- 3:45-6:15PM
Instructor: Morgan Shahan
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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History of Science & Technology

B'More: Johns Hopkins' Baltimore

Please note, class will meet Saturday, Jan. 23 in the event of inclement weather. This course is for freshmen ONLY. You know he spelled his name with an S, but what else do you know about our university's namesake, Johns Hopkins? In this B'More course, you'll explore the life and legacy of Quaker, businessman, and philanthropist Johns Hopkins. Field trips will take us to local historic sites and cultural institutions around the city, and our service project will take place at Hopkins' former home, Clifton.

Course Number: AS.140.318.33
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/18/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 10:00-4:30PM | W- 10:00-4:30PM | Th- 10:00-4:30PM | F- 10:00-4:30PM
Instructors: Jennifer Kinniff and James Stimpert
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Science, Fiction, and the Brain

Contemporary neuroscience claims to be closer than ever to figuring out what makes a person tick, but there's still a long way to go from the mapping of neuronal connections to an empirical account of consciousness, memory, and emotion. This course leaps into the ring where materialism and idealism, the mechanistic and the vitalistic, have wrangled for the past two hundred years. We will trace the history of attempts to explain and control human consciousness, both in reality and in fiction. Through philosophy, ethics, neuroscience, and literature, students will explore what is at stake in efforts to reduce the mind to a series of electrical impulses in the brain.

Course Number: AS.140.337.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 10:00-12:15PM | Th- 10:00-12:15PM
Instructor: Alicia Puglionesi
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Humanities Center

B'More: Homelessness

Please note, class will meet Saturday, Jan. 24 in the event of inclement weather. This course is for freshmen ONLY. In Baltimore, as in any major city, many urban poor find themselves without a home and without shelter. For these individuals, life on the streets is desperate and dangerous. Students will read, discuss, and debate about the causes and implications of homelessness in Baltimore, and explore present policies and potential solutions. Guest speakers include homeless rights advocates from both local government and community groups. Students will also participate in service directly affecting homeless persons.

Course Number: AS.300.100.33
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/18/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 10:00-4:30PM | W- 10:00-4:30PM | Th- 10:00-4:30PM | F- 10:00-4:30PM
Instructor: Thomas Gottbreht
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Grammar of Loss: Iranian Cinema since 1979 Revolution

This course is an interpretive and critical engagement with a number of social, political, and ethical issues that are raised in five Iranian movies made during decades since the 1979 Iranian Revolution until present. We will deal with immanent problems in the form and structure of the movies in their relation to the actual and open problems in social and political structures in Iran. We will watch works by Abbas Kiarostami, Asghar Farhadi and others.

Course Number: AS.300.119.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/15/2016
Times:  M - 2:00-4:00PM | W- 2:00-4:00PM | Th- 2:00-4:00PM | F- 2:00-4:00PM
Instructor: Omid Mehrgan
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Monsters, Miracles, and Men from Mars

From medieval mystical visions of the Godhead to modern accounts of alien abductions, encounters with the supernatural and paranormal have long been sources of terror and amazement. This course explores visual and narrative representations of these encounters. It is a media-intensive course that juxtaposes a variety of sources from the medieval period, the space age, and contemporary film and television.

Course Number: AS.300.215.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 1:45-5:00PM | W- 1:45-5:00PM | F- 1:45-5:00PM
Instructors: Katherine Boyce-Jacino and Tamara Golan
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Interdepartmental

Library Research and Research/Grant Proposal Writing

This course offers training to undergraduate and graduate students in humanities and social sciences on the fundamentals of library research and research/grant proposal writing. The course will introduce the students to the major research resources in humanities and social sciences, strategies and techniques to conduct effective research, and how to use library research to enhance research and grant proposal writing. This course aims to help students learn the basics of research and grant proposal writing and develop useful research skills that will benefit them in the long run.

Course Number: AS.360.107.12
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/15/2016
Times:  M - 10:30-12:00PM | Tu- 10:30-12:00PM | Th- 10:30-12:00PM
Instructor: Yunshan Ye
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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B'More: Baltimore City Urban Planning

Why does Baltimore have so many vacant properties? Is gentrification a good or bad thing? The transportation system seems limited? These are few of the many issues and challenges that City Planners address. This class will give an overview of urban planning using Baltimore as a laboratory. It will involve walking trips to two or more different neighborhoods as well as readings and guest speakers to explore both challenges and solutions. Students will work individually or small groups to propose policy solutions to real urban challenges.

Course Number: AS.360.108.33
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/18/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 10:00-4:30PM | W- 10:00-4:30PM | Th- 10:00-4:30PM | F- 10:00-4:30PM
Instructor: Laurie Feinberg
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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B'More: Integrative Medicine

Please note, class will meet Saturday, Jan. 23 in the event of inclement weather. This course is for freshmen ONLY. According to the World Health Organization, our globalization has seen changes in patterns of disease in both industrialized nations and in developing countries where communicable diseases formerly dominated. World wide, the burden of our health costs are due to preventable chronic diseases such as diabetes, obesity, cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurological and substance abuse issues. Because lifestyle, diet, lack of exercise and stress are major contributing factors, Traditional Medicine (TM) or Complimentary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) approaches are becoming increasingly important globally. Distinguishing between Traditional and Modern medicines, we will consider the rising use of Integrative Medicine as the upcoming model for the Healing Arts. Students will be introduced to some of the most popular types of TM or CAM, including biologically based practices,

Course Number: AS.360.122.33
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/18/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 10:00-4:30PM | W- 10:00-4:30PM | Th- 10:00-4:30PM | F- 10:00-4:30PM
Instructor: Georganne Giordano
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
BmoreB'More Course | Register Now

Applying Yourself: External Fellowships

In this writing-based course students will learn to craft competitive applications for the prestigious external fellowships overseen by the National Fellowships Program (fellowships.jhu.edu/list-of-fellowships). While learning skills to produce this specific type of writing including concision, cohesion, narrative arc, peer editing, and revising by the end of the class, students will compose a completed fellowship application and be mock interviewed by classmates and outside guests. Applying Yourself will also feature class visits from previous JHU fellowship winners. Open to all undergraduate students in all fields.

Course Number: AS.360.124.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 3:00-4:45PM | W- 3:00-4:45PM | F- 3:00-4:45PM
Instructor: Jeannette E. Miller
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Introducing the George Peabody Library

Love social media and rare books? Why not combine the two? In this course students will learn about the history of the George Peabody Library, explore its incredible collection of rare books, and creatively share the library's mysteries through social media. From a whirlwind survey of book history to examining how modern technology is giving rare materials new audiences, students will see that there is life in that old book yet.

Course Number: AS.360.128.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 1:15-3:30PM | Th- 1:15-3:30PM
Instructor: Heidi Herr
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Saint Petersburg, Florida: All Children's Hospital

Pre-medicine junior and senior students will be provided opportunities in immersion learning within pediatric specialty fields at All Children's Hospital Johns Hopkins Medicine (ACH JHM) in St. Petersburg, Florida

Course Number: AS.360.129.60
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/11/2016 - Friday 1/15/2016
Times:  M - 9:00-5:00PM | Tu- 9:00-5:00PM | W- 9:00-5:00PM | Th- 9:00-5:00PM | F- 9:00-5:00PM
Instructor: David Hall

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Breaking in Baltimore: Urban Education

Breaking in Baltimore is a week-long immersion experience(1/16 - 1/22) where students explore social justice issues by engaging greater Baltimore through direct service and educational sessions. The Urban Education program explores Baltimore's education infrastructure and the challenges of educating young Baltimoreans. Students will participate in classroom sessions as well as service learning projects in greater Baltimore with local agencies. There is also a DC policy field trip to engage these issues from a national perspective. Student participation begins the morning of Saturday, January 16 and runs through the afternoon on Friday, January 22. Students must participate full-time, including living in the off-campus retreat center and participating in some evening programming. Students must apply through Center For Social Concern. Application due early November. Fee: Approx. $125. Financial aid is available.

Course Number: AS.360.130.31
Credits: 2
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/18/2016 -
Times:  M - 9:00-5:00PM | Tu- 9:00-5:00PM | W- 9:00-5:00PM | Th- 9:00-5:00PM | F- 9:00-5:00PM
Instructor: Lance McCoy
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Is the Book Dead? An Introduction to Text Encoding

The course provides an introduction to the increasingly vital Text Encoding Initiative (TEI), and basic coding in xml. By establishing international encoding standards for literary and historical texts, TEI make texts searchable and minable in great detail, and allows you to create dynamic, multi-faceted digital editions. Learn or improve your coding, and discover the TEI standards that are essential to our expanding digital research fields.

Course Number: AS.360.171.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 1:00-3:15PM | Th- 1:00-3:15PM
Instructor: Tamsyn Rose-Steel
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Maximizing Student Entrepreneurship

Maximizing Student Entrepreneurship will be designed to help students learn how to create and maximize the potential of a startup while simultaneously maximizing a four year undergraduate experience. The instructor founded his first successfully exited startup while an undergraduate at Johns Hopkins. The course will feature two hours for each major lesson - time management, team building, resource utilization, successful networking, product development, financial management, and patience - with one hour devoted to instruction and seminar discussion and the other to a guest speaker. Each guest speaker will be a successful entrepreneur who started a company while in school, with a focus on Johns Hopkins alumni entrepreneurs.

Course Number: AS.360.172.12
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/15/2016
Times:  W- 3:00PM-5:15PM | Th- 3:00PM-5:15PM | F- 3:00PM-5:15PM
Instructor: Paul Grossinger
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Sacred Spaces

This course will explore sacred spaces and practices in eight religious traditions: Hinduism, Judaism, Catholic Christianity, Protestant Christianity, Orthodox Christianity, Sikhism, Islam, and Buddhism. Over the course of one week, students will learn to identify and appreciate elements of sacred architecture, learn more about the relationship between religious diversity and religious pluralism in the United States, and to explore the relationship between religious practice and sacred space in many of the world's traditions. This course aims to deepen students' understanding of many religious traditions as well as the role religion plays in society more generally. Class on Monday and Friday will meet at the Interfaith Center and all other days will be spent on day-long field trips.

Course Number: AS.360.225.21
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/11/2016 - Friday 1/15/2016
Times:  M - 9:00-1:00PM | Tu- 8:15-6:00PM | W- 8:15-6:00PM | Th- 8:15-6:00PM | F- 9:00-1:00PM
Instructor: Kathy Schnurr
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Breaking in Baltimore: Refugee Communities

Breaking in Baltimore is a week-long immersion experience where students explore social justice issues by engaging greater Baltimore through direct service and educational sessions. The Refugee Community program explores the challenges of refugee immigrants and the communities that support them. Student participation begins the morning of Saturday, January 16 and runs through the afternoon on Friday, January 22. Students must participate full-time, including living in the off-campus retreat center and participating in some evening programming. Students will participate in classroom sessions as well as service learning projects in greater Baltimore with local agencies. There is also a DC policy field trip to engage these issues from a national perspective. Students must apply through the Center For Social Concern--application due early November. Fee: Approx. $125. Financial aid is available.

Course Number: AS.360.276.31
Credits: 2
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/18/2016 -
Times:  M - 8:00-5:00PM | Tu- 8:00-5:00PM | W- 8:00-5:00PM | Th- 8:00-5:00PM | F- 8:00-5:00PM
Instructor: Robert Francis
Syllabus: Download (.doc)
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Materials Science and Engineering

Chocolate: Intro to Materials Science

This course will introduce students to some basic concepts in materials science including phase diagrams, crystallization, and various characterization techniques, all through the close examination of chocolate. Students will have the opportunity to try some of their own experiments to see these processes in action. This course is directed toward freshman or sophomore engineering and natural science students with no background in these topics. Love of chocolate is a must.

Course Number: EN.510.105.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 10:30-12:00PM | W- 10:30-12:00PM | F- 10:30-12:00PM
Instructor: Jennifer Dailey
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Mechanical Engineering

Introduction to Computer-Aided Design (Online)

This online course covers the use of computer-aided design (CAD) and finite element analysis (FEA) in performing mechanical design and engineering, using PTC's Creo Parametric. By the end of this course, you will be able to model parts and assemblies in 3D, interpret and create engineering drawings, and perform structural analyses. Additionally, following the completion of the requisite material, additional content will be made available to students. Students should note: you can either install Creo on your personal computer or use one of the University's computer labs. Creo is Window's based. Please know that getting Creo running on a Mac is possible, but troublesome.

Course Number: EN.530.114.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: E
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - Online | Tu- Online | W- Online | Th- Online | F- Online
Instructor: Michael Boyle
Syllabus: Download (.doc)
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Introduction to Computer-Aided Design (Online)

This online course covers the use of computer-aided design (CAD) and finite element analysis (FEA) in performing mechanical design and engineering, using PTC's Creo Parametric. By the end of this course, you will be able to model parts and assemblies in 3D, interpret and create engineering drawings, and perform structural analyses. Additionally, following the completion of the requisite material, additional content will be made available to students. Students should note: you can either install Creo on your personal computer or use one of the University's computer labs. Creo is Window's based. Please know that getting Creo running on a Mac is possible, but troublesome.

Course Number: EN.530.114.14
Credits: 1
Distribution: E
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - Online | Tu- Online | W- Online | Th- Online | F- Online
Instructor: Michael Boyle
Syllabus: Download (.doc)
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Engineering Design Outreach

This course gives JHU students an opportunity to interact with and explain the engineering design process to middle-school students at a local school. The JHU students will learn to lead an in-class engineering design challenge and share with the youth the rigorous process that is engineering design. This is an opportunity to inspire young students from disadvantaged backgrounds, show them the excitement of being an engineer and gain professional development in teaching and communication.

Course Number: EN.530.260.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: E
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 10:30-12:30PM | W- 10:30-12:30PM | F- 10:30-12:30PM
Instructor: Margaret Hart
Syllabus: Download (.doc)
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Applications in Scientific Computing

Scientific discovery and computing capability have progressed inseparably for more than the last century, but few theoretically-focused courses find time to discuss this important connection. Guided by various examples borrowed from physics and engineering courses, we will interactively explore methods of solving problems numerically using contemporary computational tools. Example problems will draw from the following fields: dynamical systems, continuum mechanics, molecular dynamics, and robotics.

Course Number: EN.530.390.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: Q E
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 1:00-4:00PM | W- 1:00-4:00PM | F- 1:00-4:00PM
Instructor: Adam Sierakowski
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Museums and Society

B'More: Exhibits in Focus

Please note, class will meet Saturday, Jan. 23 in the event of inclement weather. This course is for freshmen ONLY. Field-trip based class considers significant regional exhibits against the background of exhibitions that transformed interpretive approaches in history, art, and science museums.

Course Number: AS.389.171.33
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/18/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 10:00-4:30PM | W- 10:00-4:30PM | Th- 10:00-4:30PM | F- 10:00-4:30PM
Instructor: Jennifer Kingsley
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
BmoreB'More Course | Register Now

Books in Early Baltimore (Book Arts Baltimore)

Explore the world of books in early Baltimore through the lens of Homewood Museum and the Carroll Family. Take a closer look at papers, printing, bookbinding and bookplates and try your hand at papermaking and printing techniques. Discover the offerings of local printers and booksellers through primary sources, and how books were available to those who could not otherwise afford them, through the Library Company of Baltimore (1797) whose collections are now part of the holdings of JHU's George Peabody Library.

Course Number: AS.389.173.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/11/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 10:00-12:15PM | W- 10:00-12:15PM | Th- 10:00-12:15PM
Instructor: Catherine Arthur
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Music

Dylan, Motown and the Beatles

Marked by social and political unrest, the 1960s was one of the most dramatic decades in American history. Popular music became a significant vehicle for social and political commentary, and played an important role in shaping the legacy of this controversial decade. In this course we will explore 1960s popular music through structured listening, critical readings and guided discussion, with the aim of gaining a better understanding of 1960s popular music and its connections to the complexities of this pivotal decade.

Course Number: AS.376.142.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/11/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 10:00-12:15PM | Tu- 10:00-12:15PM | F- 10:00-12:15PM
Instructor: Michael Rickelton
Syllabus: Download (.doc)
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Music & Meditation

This course examines the influence of breath and silence in music and meditation; silence and negative space as a philosophical aesthetic; non-meditative music created through a meditative process; and music and sound for meditation. Each class will feature a voluntary guided meditation, selected readings, listening, and discussion.

Course Number: AS.376.177.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/11/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 10:00-12:30PM | W- 10:00-12:30PM | F- 10:00-12:30PM
Instructor: John Belkot
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Neuroscience

Ions in Flux: From DNA to Disease

This course will look at an important type of protein, the ion channel. Ion channels can be studied from many angles, but we will focus on how mutations in ion channels produce disease in human beings. We will do this in a discussion format designed to keep everyone engaged regardless of background.

Course Number: AS.080.208.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: N S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 6:00-8:15PM | Th- 6:00-8:15PM
Instructor: Paul Scherer
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Philosophy

Philosophy of Oppression and Resistance

In general, human beings would rather not be oppressors, and would rather not live in oppressive social orders. Yet this does not prevent social structures from being oppressive in both explicit and covert forms, even in societies highly committed to just democratic ideals. The course will analyze what it means for an individual, practice, or institution to be oppressive, and will review concrete mechanisms which underlie racialized/gendered forms of oppression such as hate speech, pornography, propaganda, ideology, and material inequality. Finally, we will discuss how social agents can resist explicit and covert oppression in a way that is conducive to the realization of just ideals.

Course Number: As 150.103.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 1:00-2:30PM | W- 1:00-2:30PM | F- 1:00-2:30PM
Instructor: Patrick O'Donnell
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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What Is Art For? Topics in Aesthetics

In this course we will consider a range of views about the purpose and functions of art held by different philosophers from antiquity to the early 20th century. We will start from Plato's criticism of art in the Republic. Against this foil we will discuss the views on the point of art of Aristotle, Lessing, Kant, the early German Romantics and Viktor Shklovsky. In addition, during the course we will read a few literary works by Sophocles, Shakespeare and Tolstoy.

Course Number: AS.150.102.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 10:30-12:15PM | W- 10:30-12:15PM | F- 10:30-12:15PM
Instructor: Anton Kabeshkin
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Myths of Quantum Physics

What is the fate of Schrodinger's cat? How does the EPR paradox lead to quantum teleportation? Who is Wigner's friend? Does wave-particle duality imply that we have free will? In this course, we will explore the philosophical problems about quantum physics and attempt to dispel the myths generated by the quantum world. No prior understanding of physics or philosophy is required.

Course Number: AS.150.124.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H N
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 3-4:30pm | W- 3-4:30pm | F- 3-4:30pm
Instructor: Genco Guralp
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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What is Happiness?

The question of human happiness dates back to Ancient times. What is the best life a human can lead? Is it a life of pleasure, or does it include other features? Does a good life vary among people and cultures, or is it universal? Do we select the things that make our life go well, so that it allows for self-creation and personal expression of one's values? Possible readings include selections from Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Nozick, Nussbaum, and Scanlon, among others.

Course Number: AS.150.200.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 10:00-11:30AM | W- 10:00-11:30AM | F- 10:00-11:30AM
Instructor: Kevin Powell
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Neurophilosophy

What can contemporary neuroscience tell us about the traditional problems in the philosophy of mind? The course will focus on three such problems: consciousness (what is the nature of conscious states?), the self (what is the self and is there such a thing?) and imagination (what is imagination and how is it possible?).

Course Number: AS.150.232.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 1:00-2:45PM | W- 1:00-2:45PM | Th- 1:00-2:45PM
Instructor: Nikola Andonovski
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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The Language of Thought

According to the Language of Thought Hypothesis, thought is couched in a mental language with a combinatorial syntax and semantics operating computationally over a system of representations physically realized in the brain. The philosopher and cognitive scientist Jerry Fodor first developed this hypothesis in his now classic 1975 work The Language of Thought. In this course, we will engage in a close reading of this text, important both for its historical and contemporary significance to cognitive scientific theorizing. Lectures will be supplemented by further historical and theoretical material. Students should come away with a deeper appreciation of some of the key concepts in cognitive science.

Course Number: AS.150.324.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 2:30-4:15PM | W- 2:30-4:15PM | Th- 2:30-4:15PM
Instructor: David Lindeman
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Physics & Astronomy

We offer a number of intersession courses in introductory astronomy this year. They may be of special interest to students considering taking 171.118, Stars and the Universe, this year because that course, usually offered in the spring semester, will not be offered in Spring 2014.

Exploring the Building Blocks of the Universe

Ever wonder what everything is made of at the smallest level? What is dark matter? What is causing the universe to accelerate? These are some of the questions that physicists at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN are trying to answer. In this course, you'll get hands on experience looking at real LHC data while learning about the current theory of particle physics and the inner workings of the LHC.

Course Number: AS.171.111.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 10:30-12:00PM | Th- 10:30-12:00PM | F- 10:30-12:00PM
Instructor: Alice Cocoros
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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We offer a number of intersession courses in introductory astronomy this year. They may be of special interest to students considering taking 171.118, Stars and the Universe, this year because that course, usually offered in the spring semester, will not be offered in Spring 2014.

The Radio Sky

Modern astronomy relies on observations of the sky across the full electromagnetic spectrum. This course will explore the sky at radio wavelengths much longer than those we see with our naked eye. Topics will include pulsars, super-massive black holes and active galactic nuclei, the birth of the universe, and dark matter. As an integral part of the course, students will use the JHU Small Radio Telescope in the Bloomberg Center to make observations of our galaxy. This course is open to all, but a familiarity with algebra and geometry is assumed.

Course Number: AS.171.130.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 3:30-5:00PM | W- 3:30-5:00PM | F- 3:30-5:00PM
Instructor: Thomas Essinger-Hileman
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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We offer a number of intersession courses in introductory astronomy this year. They may be of special interest to students considering taking 171.118, Stars and the Universe, this year because that course, usually offered in the spring semester, will not be offered in Spring 2014.

Imaging in Astronomy

How are astronomical images made? How do we design an imaging system? What technologies are necessary to take images across the electromagnetic spectrum? This course aims to address these questions and deliver a basic understanding of imaging in astronomy, in two parts. First we will outline the fundamental physics of imaging and how an image is formed. Then we will discuss how imaging is approached in practice.

Course Number: AS.171.420.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: N E
Days:  Monday 1/11/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 10:15-12:30PM | W- 10:15-12:30PM | F- 10:15-12:30PM
Instructor: Alexandra Greenbaum
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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We offer a number of intersession courses in introductory astronomy this year. They may be of special interest to students considering taking 171.118, Stars and the Universe, this year because that course, usually offered in the spring semester, will not be offered in Spring 2014.

Introduction to LabVIEW

This is a first course in programming LabVIEW for students with no programming experience. LabVIEW is widely used in research and industry for interfacing computers to instrumentation for data acquisition, analysis, and control. The topics emphasized are basic programming structures and best practices for programming in the LabVIEW environment. Additional topics are the basic concepts of working with digital signals, data acquisition, and signal processing. Lectures are interspersed with activities on using programming structures and on interfacing with equipment. Students should bring a USB memory stick to class.

Course Number: AS.173.110.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: N E
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 9:00-1:00PM | Th- 9:00-1:00PM
Instructor: Steven Wonnell
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Political Science

Who is Michel Foucault?

Who is Michel Foucault? Philosopher? Historian? Prison abolitionist? Postmodernist? Radical? In this short course, students will read one of Foucault's most famous works, Discipline and Punish, which explores themes including power, truth, law, norms, science and subjectivity, through a history of the modern prison. Foucault's interviews, lectures, and a biography will supplement and support our effort to grasp the ideas and character of one of the most influential political theorists of the 20th Century.

Course Number: AS.191.115.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/15/2016
Times:  M - 12:15-2:30PM | Tu- 12:15-2:30PM | Th- 12:15-2:30PM
Instructor: Christopher Forster-Smith
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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US Foreign Policy toward South Asia

This course will examine U.S. foreign policy toward South Asia from the period spanning the September 11th terror attacks to the present day. It will introduce students to the major issues in U.S. foreign relations with South Asia during this period, with particular focus on India and Pakistan. The course will look critically at the way U.S. foreign policy toward South Asia has developed and evolved, what major influences have shaped that policy, and how past developments have impacted present issues and problems. The course will also consider how approaches that the United States has pursued toward the region have related to broader American interests and objectives such as the non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, combating terrorism,including ISIS, promoting democracy,stabilizing the region,formulating a drone warfare policy, and managing the rise of an ascendant China.

Course Number: AS.191.223.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 10:15-12:30PM | Th- 10:15-12:30PM
Instructor: Ronak Desai, JD
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Guns at Sunset: How Wars End

What is war termination? How do diplomacy and military strategy affect the end of hostilities? These are vital questions given that wars, regardless of size, ultimately end one way or another. However, these inquires seem under-appreciated by many policymakers leading up to and during war. This course will offer an introduction to the war termination literature with an eye toward employing its findings to present day challenges in international relations. Rationalist, domestic political, and leadership approaches to the termination of war will all be considered.

Course Number: AS.191.250.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 1:00-3:15PM | Th- 1:00-3:15PM
Instructor: A. Potter
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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The Practice of Law

This course is designed to familiarize students with the world of the law and legal practice options, through the eyes of Johns Hopkins University (JHU) alumni and Baltimore City community members who are attorneys. The course will focus on the following legal specialties: Family Law, the Judiciary, Insurance Defense/Coverage, Securities and Corporate Law/the SEC, and Criminal Law. There will be a discussion with a JHU alum that is a current law student, a mock law class, and a special presentation on Judicial Clerkships.

Course Number: AS.191.260.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/15/2016
Times:  M - 2:45-5:00PM | W- 2:45-5:00PM | F- 2:45-5:00PM
Instructor: Ana Droscoski
Syllabus: Download (.doc)
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IR and the American Civil War

Together, we will explore the origins, contours, and grand strategies of the American Civil War through the lens of international relations. Despite its exceptional origins, the American Union falls into a catastrophic civil war, which ends with the conquest of one regional section by another and fundamentally changes the constitution. Topics include: the expansionary causes of disunion, the character of military forces, the foreign policies of north and south, and international perceptions of the conflict.

Course Number: AS.191.281.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/15/2016
Times:  M - 6:30-8:45PM | W- 6:30-8:45PM | Th- 6:30-8:45PM
Instructor: Ryan Fried
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
BMoreB'More Compatible Schedule | Register Now

Perspectives on Globalization

This course introduces students to perspectives on globalization and the global economy of leading professionals in a range of fields. Presentations, discussions, and readings address the changing nature and importance of global trade and finance, emerging markets, international marketing, sustainable development, human rights and national security. The course concludes with a three-day trip to NYC, which includes visits to law, finance and marketing firms, NGOs and policy organizations. Last year's visits included: HSBC, Jordan's Permanent Mission to the UN, Council on Foreign Relations, and International Rescue Committee. Class meets on Homewood campus January 11-15, and 22nd. Class goes to New York, NY January 19-21, 2016. Course/trip attendees made by faculty selection.

Course Number: AS.191.306.60
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/11/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 10:00-4:00PM | Tu- 10:00-4:00PM | W- 10:00-4:00PM | Th- 10:00-4:00PM | F- 10:00-4:00PM
Instructor: Lauren Judy
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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History of American Environmentalism

This course explores the emergence and evolution of environmentalism in American political thought, in three main periods. First, early American conservationism focused on the edifying power of nature (Muir, Thoreau, Whitman, Marsh). Second, environmentalists in the 1960s-70s rejected the excesses of industrialization and capitalism, and embraced the idea of a unified planet (Carson, Ehrlich, Commoner, Lovelock). Third, contemporary eco-modernists favor embracing technology to restructure society for efficiency and ecological harmony (Brand, Lomborg, Beck, Bookchin).

Course Number: AS.191.350.12
Credits: 2
Distribution: H N
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/15/2016
Times:  Tu- 1:30-4:30PM | Th- 1:30-4:30PM | F- 1:30-4:30PM
Instructor: Elizabeth Mendenhall
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Political Theory and Human Survival

In this class, students will read contemporary political thought about the future. We'll pay special attention to the six ways humans generally die: heat, cold, thirst, hunger, illness, and injury. Students will be encouraged to draw on their own skill sets and backgrounds to generate solution sets for survivable futures.

Course Number: AS.191.357.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 12:30-2:45PM | Th- 12:30-2:45PM
Instructor: J. Mohorcich
Syllabus: Download (.doc)
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Whiteness and Racial Identity

James Baldwin said, "As long as you think you are white, there's no hope for you." This class investigates whiteness (Who is white?) and the way definitions of whiteness have changed through history. How can the construction of whiteness as a category help us understand the racial identities of figures like Eminem? Barack Obama? We proceed chronologically from slavery and end with the Black Lives Matter movement. The final class, we consider whiteness across cultures.

Course Number: AS.191.386.22
Credits: 2
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/11/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 2:00-5:15PM | W- 2:00-5:15PM | Th- 2:00-5:15PM | F- 2:00-5:15PM
Instructor: Katherine Goktepe
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Psychological & Brain Sciences

Unconscious Computations in Mind

Despite the rich contents of our awareness, most of the computations in our mind/brain are achieved unconsciously. This course will introduce some unconscious computations spanning from perception to social cognition, and introduce how scientists study these hidden computations. We will start by examining unconscious processing in visual awareness, as exhibited in phenomena such as continuous flash suppression and inattantional blindness. This will be is followed by more discussions about computations underlying different cognitive functions, such as language and math processing, decision-making, and social priming. We will talk about what is consciousness in the end, and discuss the how artificial intelligence affect the understanding of consciousness.

Course Number: AS.200.131.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: Q S
Days:  Monday 1/11/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 10:00-12:30PM | W- 10:00-12:30PM | F- 10:00-12:30PM
Instructor: Feitong Yang
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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YesPlus - Practice of Happiness and Leadership

In this 30 hour course students will discover the happiness as a direct experience and develop soft leadership skills through a special rhythmic breathing technique called Sudarshan Kriya Yoga (SKY), interactive work projects, games, subtle yoga, and meditation. SKY integrates mind, body and heart alleviating the effect of anxiety, anger, depression, impulsivity and stress. This program will benefit students achieving higher academic performance and improved well-being during their academic tenure and life.

Course Number: AS.200.134.22
Credits: 2
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/11/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 2:00-5:45PM | W- 2:00-5:45PM | Th- 2:00-5:45PM | F- 2:00-5:45PM
Instructors: Neha Goel and Jennifer Stevenson
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Profiling Mentally Ill Mass Murderers

Mass Shootings by mentally ill are a scourge upon society. Factors like easy access to guns by dangerous mentally ill, inadequate commitment laws, the inability to predict dangerous behavior, and media frenzy, contribute to an increasing death toll. This course uses case studies to highlight the role played by diagnostic assessment (suicide by cop, psychopathic behavior, PTSD, major mental disorders), inadequate prevention civil and gun policy strategies, and stigmatization of the mentally ill as dangerous.

Course Number: AS.200.142.22
Credits: 2
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/11/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 9:00-12:45PM | Tu- 9:00-12:45PM | Th- 9:00-12:45PM | F- 9:00-12:45PM
Instructor: Lawrence Raifman
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Public Health Studies

JUMP: Pathway to Success

This course for sophomores provides important aspects of medicine including interviewing skills, historical and environmental factors affecting health, and teamwork in a health care system. Students will have an opportunity to practice simulated medicine at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine's Simulation Center and through the CPR training office. A key part of the course is also having a variety of physicians from different specialty areas share their journeys to medicine, why they love medicine, and be available for questions. There will be faculty speaker at the end of the class on almost every day. Lastly, to simulate patient interviewing, student teams will interview and video record current Hopkins medical students. Similar to a patient history, students will have to generate a medical student oral history about their pathway to medicine. Final oral histories are presented the last day of class.

Course Number: AS.280.105.22
Credits: 2
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/11/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 2:00-5:00PM | Tu- 2:00-5:00PM | W- 2:00-5:00PM | Th- 2:00-5:00PM | F- 2:00-5:00PM
Instructor: Daniel Teraguchi
Syllabus: Download (.doc)
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JUMP: Intro to Medicine

This course introduces first-year students to the connections between undergraduate education and the pursuit of medicine and other health related careers. Each class will focus on a specific content area related to the pathway to medicine such as professionalism, teamwork, public health, biomedical research, and communication. Because the course is located at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions campus (East Baltimore), medical and graduate students will play a vital role in the course. In the last hour of class, medical students will share their research or activities, which are particularly meaningful to them and insights from their undergraduate experiences that prepared them for the rigors and intensity of medical school. By the end of the course, students will be exposed to variety of components of medicine and perspectives on the life at Hopkins Medicine.JUMP Freshmen Only.

Course Number: AS.280.106.11
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/8/2016
Times:  M - 2:00-5:00PM | Tu- 2:00-5:00PM | W- 2:00-5:00PM | Th- 2:00-5:00PM | F- 2:00-5:00PM
Instructor: Daniel Teraguchi
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
BMoreB'More Compatible Schedule | CareerCareer Development | Register Now

STI - Exercise in Public Health

This course introduces students to an overview of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) with a focus on upstream intervention by applying the public health problem-solving paradigm. To simulate the real world, students are divided into small groups to tackle a STI problem in the community and demonstrate the mastery of public health concepts by successfully collaborating on a final paper with a descriptive analysis of an STI, its magnitude and determinants, exploration of the different intervention strategies and a defense of the intervention of choice.

Course Number: AS.280.208.22
Credits: 2
Distribution: N S
Days:  Monday 1/11/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 8:30-12:45PM | Tu- 8:30-12:45PM | Th- 8:30-12:45PM | F- 8:30-12:45PM
Instructor: Kenny Mok
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Public Health and Military Policy

How do U.S. military activities affect global and domestic public health? The course will explore the perspective that specific policies governing U.S. military activities exert broad influences on the public's health, both in peace and war, and that in better understanding these influences, students will be positioned to recognize their significance in various public health settings, including international health, drug and vaccine development, and in the provision of mental healthcare to U.S. veterans.

Course Number: AS.280.213.11
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/8/2016
Times:  M - 9:00-12:15PM | Tu- 9:00-12:15PM | Th- 9:00-12:15PM | F- 9:00-12:15PM
Instructor: Remington Nevin
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Health in Complex Humanitarian Emergencies

Health in Complex Humanitarian Emergencies (CHE) introduces students to the fundamentals of humanitarian response. This course explores a range of topics including: gender and vulnerable populations, war and health, refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs), infectious diseases, water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), risk communications, and the emerging field of digital humanitarianism. This course also examines the unique challenges of global climate change, health systems reconstruction in Haiti, and the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. All topics are presented with respect to their relation to complex humanitarian emergencies, and students are provided the opportunity to learn new skills and apply them to the complex issues of humanitarian response.

Course Number: AS.280.218.12
Credits: 2
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/15/2016
Times:  M - 9:45-1:00PM | Tu- 9:45-1:00PM | Th- 9:45-1:00PM | F- 9:45-1:00PM
Instructor: Jeffrey Freeman
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Breaking in Baltimore: HIV & AIDS

Breaking in Baltimore is a week-long immersion experience where students explore social justice issues by engaging greater Baltimore through direct service and educational sessions. The HIV/AIDS program explores Baltimore's healthcare infrastructure and the challenges facing diagnosed and vulnerable Baltimoreans. Students will participate in classroom sessions as well as service learning projects in greater Baltimore with local agencies. Student participation begins the morning of Saturday, January 16 and runs through the afternoon on Friday, January 22. Students must participate full-time, including living in the off-campus retreat center and participating in some evening programming. Students must apply through Center For Social Concern. Application due early November. Fee: Approx. $125

Course Number: AS.280.219.31
Credits: 2
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/18/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 8:00-5:00PM | Tu- 8:00-5:00PM | W- 8:00-5:00PM | Th- 8:00-5:00PM | F- 8:00-5:00PM
Instructor: Abby Neyenhouse
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Medical Geography

This week long seminar-style course will explore the question of "Why place matters?" through lectures, readings and in-class discussion of geographic processes that influence individual- and community-level health status. Case study examples will be drawn from both local and global contexts. Students will engage in how to apply the geographic perspective to current and emerging global health issues.

Course Number: AS.280.227.11
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/8/2016
Times:  M - 1:00-4:00PM | Tu- 1:00-4:00PM | W- 1:00-4:00PM | Th- 1:00-4:00PM | F- 1:00-4:00PM
Instructor: Katharine Shelley
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Sociology

Extreme Poverty in the United States

Is it possible that there is a level of poverty in the United States so deep that no one even knew it existed - until now? New research from Edin and Shaefer (2015) makes this case. Join a Hopkins' graduate student on Edin and Shaefer's team to dig into this exciting and controversial work. Particular focus will be given to possible public policy responses and qualitative research design challenges when studying hard-to-reach populations.

Course Number: AS.230.129.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/15/2016
Times:  M - 2:00-4:15PM | W- 2:00-4:15PM | Th- 2:00-4:15PM
Instructor: Robert Francis
Syllabus: Download (.doc)
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Piketty's Capital in the Twenty-First Century

Piketty's Capital in the Twenty-First Century is a lengthy (700 pages) but accessible synthesis of the author's rigorous research on income inequality. This research has informed social scientists and politicians as well as social movements such as Occupy. Yet Piketty's theories of the causes of rising inequality and his proposed solutions have been controversial. In this course, we will read and critically assess this major work.

Course Number: AS.230.209.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 1:30-3:00PM | W- 1:30-3:00PM | F- 1:30-3:00PM
Instructor: Daniel Thompson
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Theatre Arts and Studies

New York City Theatre Intensive

**(Open to All Majors)** January 5-10, 2016, students will attend Broadway, Off-Broadway and off-off Broadway plays and musicals in New York City, including Book of Mormon, Fun Home, Noises Off and many more. The class will meet before and after each performance (occasionally meeting one of the artists). Each student will keep a journal to be collected at the end of the class. Lodging is available or you can commute from your NJ/NY/CT location. Students must apply to be accepted to this class and pay a non-refundable deposit. The application can be found on the Course Listings page of the Study in the USA Intersession site: http://pages.jh.edu/intersession/studyusa/index.html.

Course Number: AS.225.305.60
Credits: 2
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/8/2016
Times:  Tu- 9:00-6:00PM | W- 9:00-6:00PM | Th- 9:00-6:00PM | F- 9:00-6:00PM
Instructor: Margaret Denithorne

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Writing Seminars

Narrative Medicine

The course will introduce students to the role of storytelling in medicine through a variety of essays, short stories and documentaries, from Susan Sontag's Illness as Metaphor to Atul Gawande's Complications to Terry Wrong's Hopkins. In addition to studying these narratives, students will produce their own written works and meet guest writers from the local medical community. Throughout, the course will provide students with valuable practice in critical analysis and reasoning, skills that are tested on entrance exams such as the MCAT.

Course Number: AS.220.101.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/11/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 10:00-12:30PM | Tu- 10:00-12:30PM | W- 10:00-12:30PM
Instructor: Emily Parker
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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The Glory of Love: Writing Love Poems

This class will explore a variety of love poetry including, but not limited to, patriotic love, familial love, divine love, and of course romantic love. We will write poems weekly in both free verse and meter. Readings will include poems by Keats, Shakespeare, Dickinson, Yeats, John Berryman, Jack Gilbert, and others. We will also read prose by Plato, Erich Fromm, Emerson, and others in order to discuss the poems more deeply. Fun is mandatory! IFP 1 not a prerequisite, but preferred.

Course Number: AS.220.132.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 6:00-9:00PM | W- 6:00-9:00PM | F- 6:00-9:00PM
Instructor: Songmuang Greer
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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You Can't Make this Stuff Up

Topics for this course will be autobiographical in nature. We will be considering our personal experiences and striving to articulate how those experiences relate to the larger world. The work will be both creative and analytical, as we look closely at examples of the personal narrative, and carefully revise and reconsider our own methods of autobiography. The content for the course will consist of personal essays, comics, movies, and podcasts. We will consider work by Joan Didion, James Baldwin, David Foster Wallace, Allie Brosh, Jafar Panahi, and more. IFP1 not a prerequisite, but preferred.

Course Number: AS.220.137.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 10:00-12:15PM | Th- 10:00-12:15PM
Instructor: Nathan McNamara
Syllabus: Download (.doc)
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Craft: From Flash Fiction to the Novel

Worth a (Hundred) Thousand Words: From Flash Fiction to the Novel. In this course, students will explore the tenets of flash fiction, the short story, the novella, and the novel. We will write samples (or segments) of each genre. We will compare and contrast each in terms of craft, reader expectation, and opportunity for experimentation. Readings drawn from Amy Hempel, Lydia Davis, Kurt Vonnegut, J.D. Salinger, Grace Paley, Sherman Alexie, Junot Diaz, and Ernest Hemingway, among others.

Course Number: AS.220.169.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/11/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  M - 1:00-2:30PM | W- 1:00-2:30PM | F- 1:00-2:30PM
Instructor: Courtney Sender
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Making Poetry Talk: Intro to the New York School Poets

A study of the spontaneous and art-obsessed poetry known as The New York School. Students will read selected poems by Frank O'Hara, John Ashbery, and Kenneth Koch. A workshop will be held each week in which students will incorporate devices from the week's reading into their own poetry. The New York School's influence on contemporary poets will also be emphasized.

Course Number: AS.220.170.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 11:00-12:30PM | W- 11:00-12:30PM | F- 11:00-12:30PM
Instructor: Cody Ernst
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Humor and Poetry

In this class we'll take humor seriously by reading (and writing) poems that aren't so serious. We'll read poems by W.H. Auden, Wendy Cope, May Swenson, Anthony Hecht, and others. We'll ask questions: how does humor work differently from direct statement? What are the different ways a writer can be ironic? Students will write poems in a variety of forms and styles, and learn to describe the specific style of a comic writer. They'll also read scholarly work on humor, including passages from Daniel Dennett's Inside Jokes and Rachel Giora's On Our Mind. We'll explore how poetry and humor allow us to say so much with so few words.

Course Number: AS.220.171.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/4/2016 - Friday 1/22/2016
Times:  Tu- 6:00-7:30PM | W- 6:00-7:30PM | F- 6:00-7:30PM
Instructor: Joseph Frantz
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Johns Hopkins University

“. . .Courses are designed to provide you with an intensive in-class experience followed by a trip allowing you to explore the career field of choice up close.”