Intersession Programs at Johns Hopkins
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Anthropology

Race and Violence

Decades of scholarship has shown race to be a social construct with histories of interactions across racial groups, making boundaries between groups porous, tenuous, and dubious. What then is productive of preoccupations with racial classifications? In this course, we will study how racial categorizations enable violence in imperial, colonial, and democratic projects. How have various discursive, medical, and scientific regimes buttressed such projects? We will engage with the work of anthropologists, philosophers, and legal scholars to investigate these questions in a range of contexts.

Course Number: AS.070.234.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Tuesday 1/16/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 1-330pm | Th- 1-330pm | F- 1-330pm
Instructor: Mariam Banahi
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Science Fiction and the Radical Imagination

Science fiction, from popular novels to blockbuster movies to the most recent Star Trek reboot, is big business. But it is also a genre through which radical writers and artists have explored contemporary social issues and plotted out utopian futures. This course brings together anthropological theory, literature, and other media to explore how science fiction takes up feminist and anti-racist critiques to imagine radically different forms of community and sociality.

Course Number: AS.070.283.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 1-3:30 | Th- 1-3:30
Instructor: Paul Kohlbry

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Applied Math and Statistics

A Hands-On Introduction to Matlab

This is an introductory course in programming MATLAB for students in the mathematical sciences. MATLAB is widely used in research and industry for numerical calculations, plotting of functions and data, and the creation of user interfaces. Short tutorial lectures will be followed by problem solving sessions. Topics emphasized will be basic programming in the MATLAB environment and the practical solution of problems in matrix calculations, interpolation, numerical integration and optimization.

Course Number: EN.553.282.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: Q
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 1-3:30 | Th- 1-3:30
Instructor: Tianyu Ding
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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A Hands-On Introduction to Matlab

This is an introductory course in programming MATLAB for students in the mathematical sciences. MATLAB is widely used in research and industry for numerical calculations, plotting of functions and data, and the creation of user interfaces. Short tutorial lectures will be followed by problem solving sessions. Topics emphasized will be basic programming in the MATLAB environment and the practical solution of problems in matrix calculations, interpolation, numerical integration and optimization.

Course Number: EN.553.282.31
Credits: 1
Distribution: Q
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 4-630pm | Th- 4-630pm
Instructor: Tianyu Ding
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Introduction to R

This is an introductory course in R for both undergraduate and graduate students. R is a programming language and software environment that provides a wide variety of statistical and graphical techniques, including linear and nonlinear modeling, classical statistical tests, time-series analysis, etc. We will discuss data structures, data entry and manipulation, graphical procedures, statistical models, and programming in R. No previous programming experience is required.

Course Number: EN.553.283.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: Q
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  W- 1-330pm | F- 1-330pm
Instructor: staff staff

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Introduction to Scientific Programming in Python

This is an introductory course in programming python for students in the mathematical sciences. Short tutorial lectures will be followed by problem solving sessions. Topics emphasized will include linear algebra problems, ordinary differential equations and optimization. Also a particular interest will be given to practical machine learning problems (classification, regression and clustering).

Course Number: EN.553.285.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: Q
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  W- 10am-1230pm | F- 10am-1230pm
Instructor: staff staff

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Introduction to Mathematica

This is an introductory course in Mathematica for undergraduate and graduate students in the mathematical sciences. Mathematica is a powerful, user-friendly computer algebra system used throughout academia and industry for mathematical modeling, experimentation, creating interactive visualizations, and symbolic manipulation. We will explore these functionalities while mastering the fundamentals of computing with Mathematica. Additional topics will include data mining, network analysis, and procedural programming.

Course Number: EN.553.286.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: Q
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 3-530pm | Th- 3-530pm
Instructor: Joshua Cape

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Art

The Many Faces of Masks

Masks have been used over time and across cultures to transform, heal, disguise, protect and even punish those who use them. In this course we will look at a range of masks, their cultural origins and uses and then, learning from these traditions, create our own personal version. Using sculptural and paper mache techniques each student will create their own mask.

Course Number: AS.371.179.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/19/2018
Times:  M - 9am-12p | Th- 9am-12p | F- 9am-12p
Instructor: Larcia Premo
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Biology

How Viruses Shape Our World

Viruses are at the root of many pandemics and infectious diseases, but they have also positively contributed to society by creating biological tools for research, providing insights into genetics, advancing medicine. This course incorporates research articles, active lectures, problem sets, and small discussions to help students learn the biology of viruses, how viruses have influenced society, and the basic tenants of molecular biology.

Course Number: AS.020.133.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 9-1045am | W- 9-1045am | Th- 9-1045am
Instructor: Meiling May
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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4D Biology: Seeing is Believing

Where do the images and cartoons in biology and medicine textbooks come from, and what will they look like in the future? How can we engineer and visualize, in 4D, cellular functions in development and disease? And how are these technologies being harnessed today to develop novel genetic and tissue engineering-based medical therapeutics? This course will convey the experience of the modern day experimental biologist. It will show how biomedical scientists culture organs and engineer stem cells and tissues outside the body, and how they visualize them with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution (3D+Time=4D). The course will include an overview of different techniques in cell culture, genetic engineering, and imaging, followed by a live session using different light and electron microscopes, and finally, extended hands-on sessions on image analysis and quantification. The course will also include one or two guest lectures from premiere Hopkins researchers.

Course Number: AS.020.173.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 9am-12pm | Tu- 9am-12pm | Th- 9am-12pm | F- 9am-12pm
Instructor: Dan Georgess
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Introductory RNA-seq Analysis using R

Students in this course will learn how to analyze and interpret next-generation sequencing data using tools based in R, a statistical programming language. Starting with tabular data containing gene abundance measurements from RNA-seq experiments, students will perform exploratory and comparative analyses. The final capstone project involves developing original, reproducible analyses in an elegant report. No previous programming experience is required.

Course Number: AS.020.235.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 10-1150am | W- 10-1150am | F- 10-1150am
Instructor: Caitlin Pozmanter

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Foreign Gene Expression Lab

This laboratory is a project lab that will introduce molecular cloning techniques that allow bacteria to be used to produce a particular gene product. Recombinant plasmids, carrying a fusion protein gene, will be constructed and used to transform competent E. coli, and the gene products isolated. The lab will meet 9am-noon and 1-2 pm Mon-Fri for all 3 weeks of intersession.

Course Number: AS.020.296.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  
Instructor: Robert Horner
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Biomedical Engineering

Optics Every Day

This course aims to explore how light is used in our everyday world. We will explore the basic physical properties of light and why it is integral in modern technology in a wide variety of applications from medicine and the internet to climate change. Background in physics is suggested but not required.

Course Number: EN.520.112.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: N E
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 1-4:15 | W- 1-4:15 | F- 1-4:15
Instructor: Rebecca Pak

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Intellectual Property Primer for Scientists and Engineers: Patents, Copyrights and Trademarks

The course will outline the basics of intellectual property laws with an emphasis on practical aspects of protection of IP for scientists and engineers. Most of the course will cover the basics of patent law, but introductions will also be given to trademarks and copyrights. Specific problems in the areas of biotechnology, computer science and the Internet will also be highlighted. It is hoped that the attendees will obtain a basic understanding of how intellectual property is protected. No prior legal background is required. The course begins January 9th at 6 pm.

Course Number: EN.580.105.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/19/2018
Times:  Tu- 6-8pm | W- 6-8pm | Th- 6-8pm | F- 6-8pm
Instructor: Joerg-Uwe Szipl
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Immunoengineering: A New Frontier

What therapy could cure debilitating diseases such as cancer, HIV, allergies, diabetes, Alzheimers, or influenza? Engineers and Immunologists are attempting to create this with your body's own immune system. Understanding how these therapies work, how they might work in the future, and how to apply engineering principles to enhance these therapies will be the focus of this course.

Course Number: EN.580.107.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: N E
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 10-1145am | W- 10-1145am | F- 10-1145am
Instructors: John Hickey and Gregory Howard
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Introductory Lab Skills

This course aims to familiarize first-year undergraduates with the basic lab skills necessary to work in a wet-lab. Specific skills covered will include pipetting, microscopy, PCR, gel electrophoresis, basic cell culture, simple microfluidics, and more! This hands-on experience will fully immerse students in the basics of laboratory research and should help prepare students looking for research or internship opportunities in the upcoming spring or summer semester. *This course has multiple sections at different times*

Course Number: EN.580.117.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  
Instructor: Zhiwei Yue
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Introduction to Molecules and Cells (Online)

This online course aims to familiarize first-year undergraduates with basic knowledge of biology, chemistry, math, and biochemistry necessary to succeed in the Molecules and Cells course (EN.580.221). This will allow students to learn and enforce fundamental science concepts to be able to analyze molecular and cellular systems.

Course Number: EN.580.121.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - online | Tu- online | W- online | Th- online | F- online | Su- online
Instructor: Eileen Haase
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Image and Data Analysis for Scientists

So you want to be a biomedical researcher? This course will provide you with some of the tools you'll need to succeed in research, whether in an academic, clinical, or industrial setting. The course will cover practical image analysis, statistics, and Matlab skills that will help you finish research projects (and your homework) faster! The class will be primarily lab-based, with a short lecture every day followed by hands-on computational training.

Course Number: EN.580.128.13
Credits: 2
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 2-545pm | W- 2-545pm | F- 2-545pm
Instructors: Ashley Farris and Sarah Somers

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Engineering Essentials of MRI

Learn how MRI is used in a practical setting. This course covers the physics of image acquisition, reconstruction, and pulse sequence design with interactive simulations in an active learning environment. Gain an intuitive understanding of intimidating integrals and an ability to apply your knowledge to research questions. *MLK class will be held on Friday of the same week*

Course Number: EN.580.129.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 11-1:30 | W- 11-1:30
Instructors: Eliana NessAiver and Blake Dewey

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Vascular Engineering

The human body depends on the vasculature to transport waste, nutrients, and oxygen. This course will focus on understanding the vasculature and treatment options for cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of death worldwide. Topics will include: vascular physiology/mechanics; small-diameter tissue engineered vascular graft fabrication and design; cell sources (stem and mature); and static and dynamic culture techniques in a bioreactor. Tours and demonstrations of vascular engineering labs and techniques will be given.

Course Number: EN.580.130.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: E
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 8-11:45am | W- 8-11:45am | Th- 8-11:45am
Instructor: Morgan Elliott
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Investment Management and Entrepreneurial Finance

Course focuses on methods and processes for portfolio management, optimization of individual retirement accounts, venture financing, and equity investing in companies, common stocks, and other entrepreneurial opportunities. Course will provide and exercise basic knowledge and skills needed for capital management and investing, and introduce students to heuristics for predictive analytics.

Course Number: EN.580.132.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: Q S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 1030am-1230pm | W- 1030am-1230pm | F- 1030am-1230pm
Instructor: Gordon Sun
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Prometheus et al: the Ethics and Business of Regen Med

Primarily dealing with the process of recent advances in regenerative medicine, this course will focus on the interweaving of ethics, business, and science in recent issues and news (e.g. face transplants, Prop 71, FDA regulations, the stress-induced stem cell hoax, organ transplants, clinical trials of lab grown organs) and the practical applications of those interweavings on the students' future careers. The course will also cover the common ethical frameworks, emerging economic factors, and considerations of both donor consent and donor rights.

Course Number: EN.580.215.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: E S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 1-4:15 | W- 1-4:15 | F- 1-4:15
Instructor: Ethan Nyberg
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Introduction to Synthetic Biology

This course aims to familiarize students with basic concepts in the field of synthetic biology. An overview of the theory and practice of making reengineered and artificial biological devices will be presented, and their ethical implications explored. Fundamental engineering principles of modularity, standardization, and abstraction hierarchy will be emphasized. To concretize the application of these principles, the design of a subset of nucleic acid and protein-based devices, as well artificial cells, tissues, and organisms will be discussed in some detail. Basic techniques used to engineer these synthetic systems will also be introduced. At the end of the course, students will be expected to conceptualize the design of a device of their choice, and to formulate a strategy for builduing such a device.

Course Number: EN.580.216.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 6-8:30 | Th- 6-8:30
Instructor: Kester Coutinho

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Chemistry

Practical NMR Techniques for Routine Research

This course covers practical NMR techniques that are routinely used in research. Topics include NMR hardware, one and two dimensional experiments, solvent suppression, quantitative analysis and kinetics. Basic theory, pulse sequence structure, and key setup parameters of each experiment will be discussed in depth. Advanced processing and analytical methods will also be covered. In addition to lectures, students will get hands-on experience at the spectrometer setting up experiments, acquiring, and processing data.

Course Number: AS.030.440.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: N E
Days:  Tuesday 1/16/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 1-330pm | W- 1-330pm | F- 1-330pm
Instructor: Joel Tang

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Classics

Granddaughter of the Sun: Medea in Antiquity and Beyond

This course explores the character of Medea in ancient Greek and Roman literary and artistic sources, as well as her lasting fortune in modern literature and film. We shall read Euripides' Medea and Seneca's homonymous play, in addition to excerpts from Pindar, Apollonius of Rhodes and Valerius Flaccus. These readings will be integrated with a survey of Greek and Roman artistic sources featuring Medea. The last week will be devoted to the screening of Pier Paolo Pasolini's and Lars von Trier's films dedicated to this multifaceted figure of Greek mythology.

Course Number: AS.040.138.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 1-3:30 | Th- 1-3:30
Instructor: Michele Asuni

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Gods, Heroes and Monsters:Mythology through the Visual Arts

From the battles of the Trojan War to the love affairs among the gods and mortals, the ancient Greeks and Romans depicted their favorite mythological episodes through visual representations. In this course, we will explore mythology through the medium of ancient art. We will use the iconography to investigate the significance of the ancient myths, which will be read in translation. Additionally, we will visit the Walters to examine the collection of mythological images in art.

Course Number: AS.040.144.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 10am-12pm | W- 10am-12pm | F- 10am-12pm
Instructor: Adam Tabeling
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Computer Science

Introduction to Connectomics

This course will introduce the emerging field of connectomics, and give students the opportunity to contribute directly to ongoing research efforts within the computer science department. This field enables novel brain circuit analysis at the ultrastructure level (i.e., individual synapses and neurons) and promises insight into areas such as biofidelic algorithms and the validation of the cortical column hypothesis first proposed at JHU by Vernon Mountcastle in the 1960s. We will begin by broadly surveying the field of brain mapping across different scales, and more deeply examine research in MRI-based graphs and ultrastructure electron microscopy reconstruction efforts. Students will learn about scalable algorithms and approaches to extract graphs from large image volumes (O(100 TB+)), and the importance of computer science in addressing modern neuroscience challenges. Programming experience in MATLAB, Python or R is helpful but not required.

Course Number: EN.601.201.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: N E
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 3-6:15 | W- 3-6:15 | Th- 3-6:15
Instructor: William Gray Roncal

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Virtual Reality App Development

This course will introduce Unreal Engine (UE4), the most popular game engine for creating virtual reality applications. Basic concepts of a virtual reality application, such as head-mounted device (HMD) and controllers, will be covered. These concepts will be explained concretely using examples from Unreal Engine. Students will learn the workflow of creating a virtual reality application, including how to use 3D assets and basic scripting. There will be one Oculus Rift for demo and experience. Knowledge of computer graphics and c++ is encouraged but not required.

Course Number: EN.601.204.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: E
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 1-3:30 | Th- 1-3:30
Instructor: Weichao Qiu

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Earth & Planetary Science

B'More: Cleaner, Greener, and Sustainable Baltimore: An Inside Look

This course is for freshmen ONLY. This course is designed to provide students with a strong understanding of the principles of sustainability, how they are applied at Johns Hopkins and in the City of Baltimore, and identify their role within the sustainability sphere. Topics covered include exploration of the fundamentals of sustainability, theory and application; how sustainability principles are embedded in operations in the City and at Hopkins; appreciation for the varieties of viewpoints and perspectives; and developing long-term strategies

Course Number: AS.271.119.33
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/22/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 10am-430pm | Tu- 10am-430pm | W- 10am-430pm | Th- 10am-430pm | F- 10am-430pm
Instructor: Olivia Zug
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Economics

Seminar in Financial Literacy

The Seminar in Financial Literacy is a two-week seminar designed to introduce Hopkins undergraduates to the financial services industry. The goal is to provide an introduction to a variety of topics in finance, with a practical focus on exposing the students to employment options in the industry. The Seminar will consist of two weeks of lectures, delivered by distinguished Hopkins alumni, followed by a three-day trip to New York City during which we will visit various firms in the industry. By the end of the seminar, students should have developed an understanding of the structure and jargon of the financial services industry. Hence, they should be poised to profit from the firm visits and networking receptions that will take place on the trip to NYC.Application/Registration for Experiential Learning courses/trips must be processed at the Career Center, Garland Hall 3rd Floor. Class is 5 days a week, 2 meetings per day: 9 - 11 am, and 1 - 3 pm, for 2 first weeks of intersession. The th

Course Number: AS.180.104.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 9am-3pm | Tu- 9am-3pm | W- 9am-3pm | Th- 9am-3pm | F- 9am-3pm
Instructor: Prerna Rakheja

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Electrical and Computer Engineering

Raspberry Pi DIY

This will be a lab course with materials provided for students to explore creative uses of Raspberry Pi low-cost miniature computers. Students will be able to work at their own pace on a wide variety of projects such as live data visualization, internet-connected household appliances, personal privacy devices, simple robots, and other DIY smart devices. Basic principles in Electrical Engineering and computer programming in Python will be reviewed with a focus on the Raspberry Pi.

Course Number: EN.520.113.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: E
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 1-3:30 | Th- 1-3:30
Instructor: Bryan Bosworth

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English

Irish Literature: From The Troubles to Today

This course will examine Irish Literature written during The Troubles (1968-1998) and directly thereafter (1999-2017). Particular focus will be given to Northern Irish poetry of the Ulster Renaissance and Irish Nationalist poetry written in response to the United Kingdom's vote to withdraw from the European Union. The course will discuss issues of colonialism, the modern Irish state, and Anglo-Irish relations.

Course Number: AS.060.118.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 10am-12pm | W- 10am-12pm | F- 10am-12pm
Instructor: Daniel McClurkin

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Haruki Murakami's Tokyo

Haruki Murakamis status as an internationally renowned writer remains undisputed; however, critical ire directed at the confluence of foreign influences in his writing style complicates his literary legacy in Japan. Using Tokyos cosmopolitanism as a central point, we will begin with Murakamis journalistic investigation on the 1995 Tokyo subway sarin gas attacks to frame his preoccupations with the subterranean and Japanese psyche and then segue into his short stories. Works read in translation.

Course Number: AS.060.121.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 11-12:45 | Th- 11-12:45 | F- 11-12:45
Instructor: Alexandra Lossada

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Entrepreneurship & Management

Real Estate Development & Finance

Taught by a professional in the field and a Hopkins graduate, this course explores whether the basic truths of real estate development still hold water today. Readings will be contemporary and will analyze real estate development from the point of view of the developer, the community with vested interest, the representatives of debt and equity lenders and the end purchaser.

Course Number: EN 660.160.11
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/12/2018
Times:  M - 4-7pm | Tu- 4-7pm | W- 4-7pm | Th- 4-7pm | F- 4-7pm
Instructor: Jeremy Gorelick

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Media & P.R. in the Big Apple

Gain insight into trends and career opportunities in public relations, advertising and media through one week of in-class learning (Jan. 8-12) followed by a three-day trip to New York (Jan. 16-18) to network with and learn from executives from firms like AOL (analytics), Time Magazine, AMC Networks, Sesame Workshop and FCB Health. Please note: Registration is manual--through Emily Hogan or Alayna Hayes at the Career Center

Course Number: EN.660.150.60
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/19/2018
Times:  M - 10am-3pm | Tu- 10am-3pm | W- 10am-3pm | Th- 10am-3pm | F- 10am-3pm
Instructor: Leslie Kendrick

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Sports Negotiation

Taught by a professional in the field, this course will provide an introduction to negotiation principles and explore various sports negotiations, including, but not limited to, player contracts, trades, and sponsorships. The course will be interactive and include several simulations.

Course Number: EN.660.157.22
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Tuesday 1/16/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 3-530pm | W- 3-530pm | Th- 3-530pm
Instructor: Andres Lares
Syllabus: Download (.doc)
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Leading Social Change - Community Based Learning

Learn the principles, values, and skills necessary to lead and succeed in organizations that make a positive difference in today's world. The course is designed to help students identify and provide opportunities to enhance their leadership skills. A "Blueprint for Success" will provide the framework for students to cultivate their own ideas for new socially conscious entrepreneurial ventures. The "Blueprint for Success" will culminate with a social entrepreneurial business plan competition where up to $5000 grants may be awarded to plans for start up costs associated with new initiatives designed to enhance the JHU and Baltimore City communities. Students can enroll in the course with predetermined social change initiatives in mind or develop new initiatives in the classroom setting.

Course Number: EN.660.240.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 930am-1pm | W- 930am-1pm | Th- 930am-1pm
Instructor: Caroline Ouwerkerk

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Film & Media Studies

Take the Money and Run: Heist Films

An introduction to the basics of film analysis through the study of classic heist films. In-class screenings and an emphasis on discussion over lecture. No prior experience in film studies required.

Course Number: AS.061.104.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Tuesday 1/16/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 4-6:30 | W- 4-6:30 | F- 4-6:30
Instructor: Lucy Bucknell

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The Stand-Up Comic in Society

Stand-up comics uniquely reflect their own collision of cultures, ideas, and preferences. In this class, students study and analyze influential comics, then create, workshop, and ultimately perform their own four-minute stand-up routine. In addition to classroom hours, this course includes a field trip to an open mic comedy show in Washington, DC on Wednesday, January 17th (students should reserve the time period from around 6:00 PM to midnight for this purpose and will need to provide their own transportation). The class culminates in a required final performance in front of hundreds of students on the night of January 26 (7:00-10:00 PM). In addition to Tuesday and Friday evenings, the class will meet on one Saturday evening and one Saturday morning. *please note the schedule for this class*

Course Number: AS.061.146.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 7-10pm | F- 7-10pm
Instructor: Adam Ruben

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Demystifying the Entertainment Business

For many, the entertainment business is alluring. For all, it's pretty confusing. Demystifying the Entertainment Business is a 6-day intensive course that offers students an insight into: possible behind-the-camera careers in the field (specifically writing, directing, producing, and developing), how to best prepare for those careers, and how to break into the industry once graduation finally comes. Led by JHU alum and TV writer/director/producer, Luke Kelly-Clyne, student assignments will cover a wide range depending on the lesson. Those interested in the course should be prepared to write scripts, read scripts, shoot and edit videos, and create career goal maps and resumes. (Note: some level of shooting and editing acumen will be necessary for this course, whether it's done by students or their friends, a short film deliverable will be part of the equation for successful course completion.)Class will commence on January 17 and end on January 23. Meetings will be Wednesday - Tuesda

Course Number: AS.061.214.21
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Tuesday 1/16/2018 - Friday 1/19/2018
Times:  M - See Description
Instructor: Luke Kelly-Clyne

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The Entertainment Industry in Contemporary Hollywood

Students will have the opportunity to spend one week in Los Angeles with Film and Media Studies Director Linda DeLibero. Students will meet and network with JHU alums in the entertainment industry, as well as heads of studios and talent agencies, screenwriters, directors, producers, and various other individuals in film and television. Associated fee with this intersession course is $1400 (financial support is available for those who qualify. All students are responsible for the cost and arrangement of air and ground transportation.) Permission of Linda DeLibero is required. Film and Media Studies seniors and juniors will be given preference for the eight available slots, followed by senior minors.Students are expected to arrive in Los Angeles on January 7. The actual course runs January 8-12 with lodging check-in on January 7 and check-out on January 13.

Course Number: AS.061.377.60
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/12/2018
Times:  M - 9am-4pm | Tu- 9am-4pm | W- 9am-4pm | Th- 9am-4pm | F- 9am-4pm
Instructor: Linda DeLibero

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Geography Environmental Engineering

Energy 101: Introduction to the Business and Policy of the US Energy Industry

This three-day intersession class will be a high-level overview of the US energy industry. We will focus on electricity, natural gas, oil, renewables and other forms of energy. We will discuss how each commodity is produced and traded from the perspective of the producer, the distributor, and the end user. The class will provide an overview of the technologies that convert energy into useful work, as well as the market, regulatory, and policy structures that influence investment in production, delivery, and consumption of electricity and natural gas. The goal is to provide a basis for further study, and to motivate students to consider a career in the industry. There are no prerequisites or textbooks, and the class is open to all. The course will be a mix of economics, basic engineering, financial mathematics, and sociology. Energy use, production and efficiency at the Homewood campus will be discussed. Instructors are Carl Liggio and David Yaffe.

Course Number: EN.570.408.11
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/12/2018
Times:  M - 1-6pm | Tu- 1-6pm | W- 1-6pm
Instructor: Carl Liggio

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Energy 102: Traditional Energy and Investment Banking

This class will focus on oil and natural gas industry. Day one will focus on all facets of the oil industry will be covered from exploration and production transportation and refining to economics and trading. It will also discuss alternative/renewable fuels and how they can interface with the fossil fuel energy infrastructure. Day two will focus on the financing of oil and natural gas exploration and production. The day will include an overall survey of upstream and midstream energy investment banking. Topics will include the economics of taking a development project from an initial proposal through full production. This will be explored through different financing options including private equity, mezzanine finance, and conventional bank financing. Instructors are alumni from the industry. **This course will be offered on January 22 and 23.*

Course Number: EN.570.409.31
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/22/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 9-5 | Tu- 9-5
Instructor: Carl Liggio

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Energy 103: Financing a Sustainable World

This three-day intersession class will examine the role of financial markets as the world looks to shift to a more environmentally sustainable global system and fund the trillions of dollars of necessary to enable this shift. The class will begin with a brief overview of the capital markets, the current energy mix in the United States, and how new energy projects are evaluated and funded. Students will be asked to review, analyze and discuss investment opportunities focusing on key risks, economic return, and environmental impact. The goal of the course is to understand how the global financial market, one of man's most powerful tools, is currently financing change and how it can be more efficiently leveraged to address global environmental issues. Day three will focus on the legal issues of project and tax equity financing, mergers and acquisitions, renewable energy development and the international and domestic energy sector overall. Instructors: Jeff Eckel, Guy Van Syckle, Nike Opa

Course Number: EN.570.410.31
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/22/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  W- 9-3 | Th- 9-3 | F- 9-3
Instructor: Carl Liggio

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German and Romance Languages and Literatures

There will be monsters (& popcorn!)

In an article published by The New York Times, Shaila Dewan affirms that: the idea that horror movies reflect, or even caricature, society's collective anxieties is nothing new. However, horror movies serve not only to exploit (and somehow even exorcise) the deepest daily fears of many, but also to pointedly empower rhetoric devices such as metaphors, diversions and transfers. In this course we shall explore this idea through the work of classic and emergent filmmakers.

Course Number: AS.211.206.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 1-2:45 | W- 1-2:45 | F- 1-2:45
Instructor: Guido Furci

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The Happiness of the Beasts. Exploration of an Imagery

Is my cat happier than me? Despite assuming different forms, this seemingly banal question has haunted man for centuries, as it entails a troubling inquiry into the very idea of human civilization and its uncertain boundaries with nature and bestiality. This course explores this long-lasting issue, by analyzing how the relationship between Man and Nature has been questioned by poets, filmmakers, and philosophers, from Homer to nowadays.

Course Number: AS.211.223.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 11-12:45 | W- 11-12:45 | F- 11-12:45
Instructor: Alberto Luca Zuliani
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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History

The World of Alexander Hamilton

Lin-Manuel Miranda's Tony Award-winning musical and Ron Chernow's acclaimed biography have thrust Alexander Hamilton into the limelight. This course will investigate the life of one of America's most enigmatic founding fathers and the turbulent Atlantic world he inhabited. In the process, we will consider the role of biography in writing the history of Revolutionary America and consider Hamilton's legacy in the popular imagination.

Course Number: AS.100.277.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/19/2018
Times:  M - 10am-12pm | Tu- 10am-12pm | W- 10am-12pm | Th- 10am-12pm
Instructor: Christopher Consolino
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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'The Hot Dynasty': The Tudors in Popular Culture

This course examines twenty-first century representations of England's Tudor dynasty (1485-1603) in literature, television, and film. From Shakespeare to Showtimes “The Tudors, the Tudor monarchs have continued to fascinate audiences for centuries. This course explores the ways in which authors and filmmakers have sought to make Tudor history relevant and profitable in the present day, often at the expense of historical accuracy.

Course Number: AS.100.281.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 1-4:15 | W- 1-4:15 | F- 1-4:15
Instructor: Jessica Keene

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"Gayborhood" Histories

Many cities have designated "gayborhoods" as cultural districts. This course will use a variety of histories and case studies to explore how gender and sexuality have come to be seen as marketable and spatialized. Class tours will explore sites related to Baltimore lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer history. Through neighborhood voices we will explore the stories elided by "gayborhood" construction, with particular attention to the intersections of race, class, and gender.

Course Number: AS.100.284.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 1-330pm | Tu- 1-330pm | W- 1-330pm | Th- 1-330pm
Instructor: Morris Speller

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The Poetics and Politics of Sex: Gender and Sexuality

This course demonstrates the centrality of gender and sexuality to understanding how European empires functioned historically in terms that include but are not limited to the bureaucracy of the colonial state, the treatment of colonial subjects in both legal and social norms, travel and migration, and the liminal position of elite colonial subjects. Each week through lectures, selected readings, and discussions, students will explore the multiple ways historians can use gender and sexuality to produce and analyze history.

Course Number: AS.100.299.22
Credits: 2
Distribution: H
Days:  Tuesday 1/16/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 11-2:45 | W- 11-2:45 | Th- 11-2:45 | F- 11-2:45
Instructor: Simone Stewart
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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The Iberian Conquest in Technicolor

This course examines how popular films have depicted the sixteenth-century Iberian conquest of the Americas. By analyzing cinematic interpretations of Spanish and Portuguese colonization alongside first-hand accounts and scholarly articles about the conquest, we will consider how the past is remembered and retold, the ways in which violence and cultural exchange are imagined and represented, and the changing cinematic portrait of the history of Latin America.

Course Number: AS.361.107.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 8:00am-9:45am | W- 8:00am-9:45am | F- 8:00am-9:45am
Instructor: Lauren MacDonald
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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History of Science & Technology

Saints and the Culture of Healing

A course that seeks to explore the temporal changes and traditions that involve healing and faith in Western culture, in particular in the Roman Catholic tradition, as well as different concepts of disease and what it means to be healthy and sick within a community. Classes will discuss key figures within the Judeo-Christian culture at different time periods (ancient, medieval, and modern) who responded to the sick and marginalized through their works of charity and physical healing, with the aim of restoring the community and creating a culture of health. There will also be a hands-on learning experience of some religious communities in the Baltimore area who are dedicated to serving the elderly poor and sick. Class Schedule is 9am-12pm: Tue 1/16, Wed 1/17, Mon 1/22, Wed 1/24, Fri 1/26

Course Number: AS.140.157.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Tuesday 1/16/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - See Description
Instructor: Rev. Athanasius Murphy

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Women in Science

This course explores the histories, accomplishments and challenges of women scientists in a variety of disciplines ranging from medicine to astronomy. This exploration is driven by lectures, discussion, readings, videos and documentaries. Students will integrate historical narratives and modern day culture to develop an understanding of the issues women face in scientific fields. You do not have to be a woman or scientist to enjoy this course!

Course Number: AS.140.307.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Tuesday 1/16/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 3-5:30 | W- 3-5:30 | Th- 3-5:30
Instructor: Anastasia Lambrou

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Humanities Center

B'More: Homelessness in Baltimore

This course examines the causes of and solutions to homelessness in Baltimore and the nation. Lectures and guest speakers will emphasize humanizing people facing homelessness and ways to get involved. A bus tour of the city will introduce students to the political and economic history of Baltimore, focusing on the concentration of poverty in East and West Baltimore. Volunteering at the Our Daily Bread soup kitchen will put a human face to poverty and homelessness.

Course Number: AS.300.100.33
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/22/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 10-4 | Tu- 10-4 | W- 10-4 | Th- 10-4-
Instructor: Thomas Gottbreht

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How to Succeed in School Without Really Learning

We are sometimes told not to let schooling interfere with our education. This class will investigate educational theories which contest the idea that schools exist primarily to promote learning. Alternatives to be explored include the correspondence theory (Bowles and Gintis), the reproduction of cultural capital (Bourdieu), and the credentials race as expounded in David Labaree.

Course Number: AS.300.222.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 1230-4pm | W- 1230-4pm | Th- 1230-4pm
Instructor: Michael McCreary

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The Erotic Dialogues

What is love? What do sex and friendship have to do with it? Does love drive us crazy, or lead us to wisdom? Does love make us better people or worse, more ourselves or less? Together with Plato, we will ask these questions and more through a reading of his so-called “Erotic Dialogues.We will expand the conversation through reading Aristotle on friendship and watching the 2001 cult classic, Hedwig and the Angry Inch.

Course Number: AS.300.234.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 4-5:45 | Tu- 4-5:45 | W- 4-5:45
Instructor: Harel Newman

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FASCISM: HISTORY, REVOLUTION, REACTION

In his well-known 1995 essay the Italian thinker Umberto Eco names fourteen common features of fascism as an alarming phenomenon no matter which form it takes and when. We will examine this claim and ask of the historical substance of fascism while discussing the recurrent allure of it from a philosophical, psychoanalytical, aesthetic, and politico-economical perspective. We consider how Fascism emerged as a reactionary revolution to resolve crises of modern bourgeois society.

Course Number: AS.300.244.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: H N Q E S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 3-4:45PM | Th- 3-4:45PM | F- 3-4:45PM
Instructor: Omid Mehrgan

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Hannah Arendt - The Human Condition

Hannah Arendt is one of the most insightful and controversial philosophers of the 20th century. In this course, we will read her classic work, The Human Condition, in which she offers a penetrating analysis of life in the modern world, with a particular focus on three forms of human activity: labor, work, and action.

Course Number: AS.300.245.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 1-3:30 | Th- 1-3:30
Instructor: Alexander Host

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A Critical Genealogy of Anxiety Disorders

Utilizing the notions of genealogy and critique as developed by Nietzsche, Deleuze, and Foucault, this course will explore key junctures in the history of anxiety and related disorders, from Sigmund Freud's early writings on the topic in the 1890s to the latest edition of the American Psychiatric Association's "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (DSM 5; 2013).

Course Number: AS.300.294.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 11am - 2pm | F- 11am - 2pm
Instructor: Avraham Rot

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Interdepartmental

Library Research and Research/Grant Proposal Writing

This course offers training to undergraduate and graduate students on the fundamentals of library research and research/grant proposal writing. The course will introduce the students to the major research resources (esp. social sciences), strategies and techniques to conduct effective research, and how to use library research to enhance research and grant proposal writing. This course aims to help students learn the basics of research and grant proposal writing and develop useful research skills that will benefit them in the long run.

Course Number: AS.360.107.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 11-12:45 | W- 11-12:45 | Th- 11-12:45
Instructor: Yunshan Ye
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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B'More: Baltimore City Urban Planning

This course is for freshman ONLY. Why does Baltimore have so many vacant and underutilized properties? Is gentrification a good or bad thing? How can the City become more sustainable? These are few of the many issues and challenges that City Planners address. This class will give an overview of urban planning using Baltimore as a laboratory. It will involve walking trips to two or more different neighborhoods as well as readings and guest speakers to explore both challenges and solutions. Students will work individually or small groups to propose policy solutions to real urban challenges.

Course Number: AS.360.108.33
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/22/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 10-4:30 | Tu- 10-4:30 | W- 10-4:30 | Th- 10-4:30
Instructors: Laurie Feinberg and Mark Cameron

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B'More: Integrative Medicine

This course is for freshmen ONLY. World wide, the burden of our health costs are due to preventable chronic diseases such as diabetes, obesity, cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurological and substance abuse issues. Because lifestyle, diet, lack of exercise and stress are major contributing factors, Traditional Medicine (TM) or Complimentary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) approaches are becoming increasingly important globally. Distinguishing between Traditional and Modern medicines, we will consider the rising use of Integrative Medicine as the upcoming model for the Healing Arts. Students will be introduced to some of the most popular types of TM or CAM, including biologically based practices. Strategies for optimal health during your academic years will be offered and demonstrated. An interactive and eye-opening class!

Course Number: AS.360.122.33
Distribution: H N
Days:  Monday 1/22/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 10:00am-4:30pm | Tu- 10:00am-4:30pm | W- 10:00am-4:30pm | Th- 10:00am-4:30pm | F- 10:00am-4:30pm
Instructor: Georganne Giordano

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Cooking the Books

Students will examine cookbooks and cookery ephemera ranging from the 16th through the early 20th centuries in order to learn about book history, forgotten celebrity chefs, the art of creating "manly" sandwiches, and just why so many cookbooks included recipes for treating the plague. Students will also have the opportunity to recreate a recipe from one of the antique cookbooks. Bon appétit!

Course Number: AS.360.128.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 6:15-8:30pm | Th- 6:15-8:30pm
Instructor: Heidi Herr

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Breaking in Baltimore: Urban Education

Breaking in Baltimore is a week-long immersion experience(1/20 - 1/26) where students explore social justice issues by engaging greater Baltimore through direct service and educational sessions. The Urban Education program explores Baltimore's education infrastructure and the challenges of educating young Baltimoreans. Students will participate in classroom sessions as well as service learning projects in greater Baltimore with local agencies. Student participation begins the morning of Saturday, January 20 and runs through the afternoon on Friday, January 26. Students must participate full-time, including living in the off-campus retreat center and participating in some evening programming. Students must apply through Center For Social Concern. Application available mid-October on the CSC website: http://studentaffairs.jhu.edu/socialconcern/programs/alternative-breaks/ . Fee: Approx. $175. Financial aid is available.

Course Number: AS.360.130.31
Credits: 2
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/22/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 9:00am-5:00pm | Tu- 9:00am-5:00pm | W- 9:00am-5:00pm | Th- 9:00am-5:00pm | F- 9:00am-5:00pm | Su- 9:00am-5:00pm
Instructor: Shawntay Stocks

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Personal Training Prep Course

This course is designed to give students the knowledge and understanding necessary to prepare for the American Council on Exercise (ACE) Personal Trainer Certification Exam. This course includes both theoretical and practical components to prepare you to become a successful personal trainer.

Course Number: AS.360.155.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 6:15-8;30 | Tu- 6:15-8:30 | Th- 6:15-8:30 | Su- 8-10AM
Instructor: Jackie Lebeau

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BMore: Inventive: Charm City Entrepreneurs

This course is for freshmen ONLY. In this course we'll discuss various established entrepreneurial successes within the arts & culture, science and tech sectors here in Baltimore. Classroom discussions and workshops will be complemented with site visits to meet and speak with several top female entrepreneurs throughout the city. Students will learn how to sow the seeds of burgeoning business ideas for eventual development and create short business plans.

Course Number: AS.360.156.33
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/22/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 10-4 | Tu- 10-4 | W- 10-4 | Th- 10-4
Instructor: Monica Lopez-Gonzalez
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Write, Reuse, Recycle: The Lives of Early Books

What happened to early books after they were made? In this course, students will examine rare books and manuscripts in our special collections and see firsthand the ways that owners transformed their books, from the Renaissance up to our own time. By looking at the "afterlives" of these early books, we can better understand how societies approached and valued the past and its artifacts.

Course Number: AS.360.157.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 11-1:30 | Th- 11-1:30
Instructor: Neil Weijer

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Open Scholarship: How to be an Open Researcher Today

'Open' is a term often used to describe the movement to share scholarship and research without pay walls. Open scholarship topics include open source, open access, open data, open educational resources, and open science. What do these terms really mean? And how will this affect your writing and research as you move through your academic career? These are the questions we will explore in this one-credit course.

Course Number: AS.360.158.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H N E S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 1-2:45 | W- 1-2:45 | F- 1-2:45
Instructor: Robin Sinn

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Pain and the Humanities

Pain is a nearly universal element of the human experience. It is poorly understood on a medical level and often called 'subjective'. Pain is in fact intersubjective and depends heavily on culture and context for meanning. This course will explore the meaning of pain and the influences of science and the arts taking a long view.

Course Number: AS.360.159.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 9-11:30 | W- 9-11:30
Instructor: Beth Hogans

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Beatbox Algebra

Through musical, scientific and verbal engagement, students will develop ways to enhance and improve their own relationship with Hip Hop vocal percussion, and also discover ways of applied practical and mathematical uses through varied formations of algebraic equations. The course also explores the history and traditions of a largely misunderstood, yet popular and now global African-American music tradition, and all of its indispensable applied scientific, linguistic and mathematical qualities.

Course Number: AS.360.164.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 11-12:45 | W- 11-12:45 | F- 11-12:45
Instructor: Dominic Bouma

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Brain Mechanisms of Reward

This course is designed to provide a general understanding of the reward mechanisms of the brain and how reward processing affects behavior. The course is divided into sections providing an overview of the brain reward system, types of reward (i.e. natural and drugs of abuse), research models (human and animal models), and psychiatric conditions involving reward processing. Course material will include lectures and reading of primary literature. Assessments will be both written and oral.

Course Number: AS.360.165.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 4-5:45 | W- 4-5:45 | F- 4-5:45
Instructors: Kimberly Smith and Miranda

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VC, Entrepreneurship & Emerging Technologies

This course will provide students with an overview of the venture capital ecosystem both from the perspective of the entrepreneur and the investor. We will explore the various sources of startup funding, the VC due diligence process, common startup business models, and the new technologies that are shaping the future, such as artificial intelligence and the blockchain. Topics will be discussed both in lecture and group discussion format and will feature guest speakers from prominent venture capital firms. Students will also complete short in-class projects such as business plan pitches.

Course Number: AS.360.166.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 6-8:30 | Th- 6-8:30
Instructor: Huston Collins

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Physics of Sports

Starting with an introduction to basic concepts in physics learn why a curve ball curves, why a ping pong ball dunks, how the speed and temperature of bobsled critically define its trajectory and dynamics, etc. The course will try to build general understanding of physics needed to explain various sports in a greater depth and to appreciate the amount of science and engineering that goes into designing sporting equipment.

Course Number: AS.360.167.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: N E
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 6-8:30 | F- 6-8:30
Instructor: Muhammad Ali Yousuf

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B'More: Social Innovation and Equity

This course provides students an introduction to social innovation and entrepreneurship, and their relation to Baltimore's growing technology sector. This course centers equity in its discussion to begin unpacking the challenging paradigms created by economic growth in the city. Students will have the opportunity to hear from local innovators and entrepreneurs, and visit co-working spaces like JHU Social Innovation Lab. The course will culminate with a "pitch" competition for innovative student ideas addressing local needs.

Course Number: AS.360.169.33
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/22/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 10-4 | Tu- 10-4 | W- 10-4 | Th- 10-4
Instructor: Charlotte James

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Maximizing Student Entrepreneurship

Maximizing Student Entrepreneurship will be designed to help students learn how to create and maximize the potential of a startup while simultaneously maximizing a four year undergraduate experience. The instructor founded his first successfully exited startup while an undergraduate at Johns Hopkins. The course will feature two hours for each major lesson - time management, team building, resource utilization, successful networking, product development, financial management, and patience - with one hour devoted to instruction and seminar discussion and the other to a guest speaker. Each guest speaker will be a successful entrepreneur who started a company while in school, with a focus on Johns Hopkins alumni entrepreneurs.

Course Number: AS.360.172.22
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Tuesday 1/16/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 1-330pm | W- 1-330pm | Th- 1-330pm
Instructor: Paul Grossinger
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Johns Hopkins' Baltimore

You know he spelled his name with an S, but what else do you know about our university's namesake, Johns Hopkins? In this course you'll explore the life and legacy of Quaker, businessman, and philanthropist Johns Hopkins. Examine historic documents from our own Special Collections and visit Homewood House and Hopkins' former home, Clifton, to learn about both the man himself and life in 19th century Baltimore.

Course Number: AS.360.180.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 1-3:30 | Th- 1-3:30
Instructors: Jennifer Kinniff and James Stimpert

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Breaking in Baltimore: Refugee Communities

Breaking in Baltimore is a week-long (1/20-1/26) immersion experience where students explore social justice issues by engaging greater Baltimore through direct service and educational sessions. The Refugee Community program explores the challenges of refugee immigrants and the communities that support them. Student participation begins on Saturday, January 20 and runs through Friday, January 26. Students must participate full-time, including living in the off-campus retreat center and participating in some evening programming. Students will participate in classroom sessions as well as service learning projects in greater Baltimore with local agencies. There is also a DC policy field trip to engage these issues from a national perspective. Students must apply through the Center For Social Concern--application available mid-October on the CSC website: http://studentaffairs.jhu.edu/socialconcern/programs/alternative-breaks/ . Fee: Approx. $175. Financial aid is available.

Course Number: AS.360.276.31
Credits: 2
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/22/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  
Instructor: Robert Francis

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International Studies

Public International Law

This course will introduce students to key aspects of international law: the various sources of international law; the relationship between international law and domestic law; several of the fora that may address international law questions; the actors that have rights and duties under international law; and issues commonly seen in the global setting that bear on international legal norms, including, human rights and use of force. Examples and simulations will focus on East Asia.

Course Number: AS.192.301.11
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/12/2018
Times:  Tu- 10-4 | Th- 10-4 | F- 10-4
Instructor: Ilhyung Lee

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Materials Science and Engineering

Chocolate: An Introduction to Materials Science

This course will introduce students to some basic concepts in materials science including phase diagrams, crystallization, and various characterization techniques, all through the close examination of chocolate. Students will have the opportunity to try some of their own experiments to see these processes in action. This course is directed toward freshman or sophomore engineering and natural science students with no previous background in these topics.

Course Number: EN.510.105.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: N E
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 1-3:30pm | W- 1-3:30pm | F- 1-3:30pm
Instructor: Shane Arlington
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Mathematics

Symmetries & Polynomials

In this course we'll derive the formula for the roots of general cubic and 4th degree polynomials using complex numbers and some basic group theory and try to see why NO such formula exists for higher degree polynomials! This will require us to learn the theory of symmetry groups and explore it's connection to polynomials via permutations of roots, in the process we'll catch a glimpse of a much deeper algebraic theory in mathematics called Galois theory. [This course will be taught in the mode of Inquiry Based Learning which means that problem sheets will be handed out in the class instead of a regular lecture and students will learn the subject by actively solving problems instead of passively listening to a lecture.]

Course Number: AS.110.361.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/19/2018
Times:  M - 10:00AM-12:00PM | Tu- 10:00AM-12:00PM | W- 10:00AM-12:00PM | Th- 10:00AM-12:00PM
Instructor: Apurva Nakade
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Mechanical Engineering

Introduction to Computer-Aided Design (Online)

This course explores many aspects of the mechanical design and development process using computer-aided design (CAD) and finite element analysis (FEA). Solid modeling, assembly modeling, detail drafting, and structural/thermal analysis are all explored using Creo Parametric (a PTC CAD software).

Course Number: EN.530.114.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: E
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - online | Tu- online | W- online | Th- online | F- online
Instructor: Michael Boyle

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Biomedical Microdevices: from Engineering to Medicine

This course will provide an overview of the cutting-edge biomedical microdevices, focusing on their engineering renovation. Students will study of Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology and its impact to biomedical devices. We will learn basic working mechanisms of different sensors, design and fabrication of biomedical microdevices. Examples of biomedical microdevices in clinical application and relevant engineering technologies behind them will be covered, for offering students with an interface between engineering and medicine. Students will learn how to apply fundamental engineering knowledge to solve challenges in healthcare applications.

Course Number: EN.530.131.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: E
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 6-9pm | W- 6-9pm
Instructor: Xing Chen

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Engineering Design Outreach

This course gives JHU students an opportunity to interact with and explain the engineering design process to middle-school students at a local school. The JHU students will learn to lead an in-class engineering design challenge and share with the youth the rigorous process that is engineering design. This is an opportunity to inspire young students from disadvantaged backgrounds, show them the excitement of being an engineer and gain professional development in teaching and communication.

Course Number: EN.530.260.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: E
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 12:30-2:30pm | W- 12:30-2:30pm | Th- 12:30-2:30pm
Instructor: Margaret Hart

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Reverse Engineering and Diagnostics

The course will impart students with good problem diagnostic skills and provide technical intuition through reverse engineering. The learning platform will be a 1940s era Ford tractor, which was the first modern tractor whose design set the stage for all tractors that have followed. The tractor has excellent examples of electrical, hydraulic, fuel, cooling, ignition, and propulsion systems. Students will disassemble, inspect, understand and repair the systems as needed. This course is intended for students who have little or no practical engineering experience. A goal of the course is to empower students with the confidence to dissect systems, discover design flaws and propose solutions.

Course Number: EN.530.266.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: E
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 10:00AM-12:00PM | Th- 10:00AM-12:00PM
Instructor: Stephen Belkoff

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Medicine, Science, and the Humanities

Law & Medicine: Where's the Patient?

This course will explore the philosophical, ethical, and societal underpinnings of how the law has developed around issues of medicine such as consent, negligence (malpractice), public health, end-of-life decision making, and regulation. The first class session will include a brief introduction to the American legal system. Other class sessions will be interactive discussions centered on short readings from legal cases, journalism, essays, and other sources. This course is suitable for students from any major or year.

Course Number: AS.145.111.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 1-2:45 | W- 1-2:45 | F- 1-2:45
Instructor: Dave Shade

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B'More: Medicine, Art and Storytelling

In this class, we'll explore the topics of healthcare, illness, and healing through the lens of Baltimore art and literature. Highlights will include a custom tour of the Baltimore Museum of Art, a visit to a Remington nonprofit that helps heal the community by teaching local youth to tell their stories through documentary film, and a trip to the Peabody Library to see medical books and artifacts dating back to the 16th century. Throughout, students will strengthen their close reading, analytic, writing and discussion skills.

Course Number: AS.145.113.33
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/22/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 10-4 | Tu- 10-4 | W- 10-4 | Th- 10-4
Instructor: Emily Parker

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Stories of People, Science, and Medicine

Description: All scientific and medical advances start with personal stories. It is the people and their problems that inspire scientists and physicians to seek new knowledge that translates into advances that can improve health. These stories also highlight important issues of humanity affecting individual relationships, social policy, and bioethics. This intersession course utilizes 3 contemporary books to stimulate discussions of science, medicine, and humanism. Format: This is a three-week course consisting of two ninety-minute sessions per week. One book will be discussed every week. The first session of each week will focus on the science and medical implications and the second session will focus on the humanistic aspects. The scientific and medical sessions will start with a 30 minute introduction to the topic led by an expert in the field. Discussion will be guided by the faculty and visiting experts but will be driven by student responses to the material.

Course Number: AS.145.211.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H N
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 4:00PM-6:30PM | Th- 4:00PM-6:30PM
Instructor: Peter Agre

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Museums and Society

B'More: Art in Baltimore's Museums

This freshman course splits time into morning lectures and afternoon museum visits. Students will visit four Baltimore institutions- the American Visionary Art Museum, the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Walters and the Reginald F Lewis Museum- and have the opportunity to engage in conversations about understanding art, curatorial choices, and the role of museums in a modern city. Students will read select texts exploring art appreciation and write a short paper summarizing their ideas the role of art in society today.

Course Number: AS.389.179.33
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/22/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 10am-430pm | Tu- 10am-430pm | W- 10am-430pm | Th- 10am-430pm
Instructor: Suzanne Kopf

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Music

Dylan, Motown and the Beatles

Marked by social and political unrest, the 1960s was one of the most dramatic decades in American history. Popular music became a significant vehicle for social and political commentary, and played an important role in shaping the legacy of this controversial decade. In this course we will explore 1960s popular music through structured listening, critical readings and guided discussion, with the aim of gaining a better understanding of 1960s popular music and its connections to the complexities of this pivotal decade.

Course Number: AS.376.142.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/19/2018
Times:  M - 9am-12pm | W- 9am-12pm | F- 9am-12pm
Instructor: Michael Rickelton
Syllabus: Download (.doc)
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A Moment of Creative Explosion: Arts in Prewar Paris

In the years just before World War I (1910-1914), Paris attracted creative talents from across Europe. This explosively fertile cultural moment witnessed an extraordinary collection of artists collaborating on projects, exchanging ideas, and exploring new ways of perceiving the world. In this course, students will immerse themselves in vibrant Belle poque Paris through works of music (Ravel, Stravinsky, Satie), visual art (Monet, Matisse, Picasso, Chagall), dance (Nijinsky), theater (Cocteau, Lugn-Poe), and literature (Apollinaire).

Course Number: AS.376.163.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 10am-1230pm | Th- 10am-1230pm
Instructor: Nathaniel Cornelius

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Expanding Time, Space + Meaning in Visual Art and Music

This course tracks evolving concepts and perceptions of time and space throughout the 20th century and the implications of such concepts on notions of meaning and beauty in both visual and musical contexts. Specifically, this course will consider the performances and recordings of pianist Ivo Pogorelich and the abstract expressionist paintings of Gerhard Richter as contemporary traces of a more sweeping historical gesture embodied in the work Paul Cezanne, beginning near the turn of the 20th century.

Course Number: AS.376.178.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 1:00pm-3:00pm | W- 1:00pm-3:00pm | F- 1:00pm-3:00pm
Instructor: Jonathan Zwi
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Neuroscience

Ions in Flux: From DNA to Disease

This course will explore the diverse ways in which ion channels work normally and, more importantly, the dire consequences of their dysfunction. We will not attempt to cover all aspects of ion channel function. Instead, we will focus on particular ion channels with significant disease relevance. To facilitate critical thinking and discussion, the course will include discussion of primary literature in each class in addition to didactic lectures.

Course Number: AS.080.208.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 6-830pm | Th- 6-830pm
Instructor: Paul Scherer
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Philosophy

Scientific Realism and Antirealism

In this course we will address the question of whether scientific theories should be considered to be approximately true. In doing so, we will examine various arguments for the conclusion that scientific theories ought to be regarded as being approximately true. We will also examine antirealist arguments to the contrary that claim that scientific theories are not approximately true, but rather ought to be regarded as predictive tools.

Course Number: AS.150.117.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 10:00am-12:45am | W- 10:00am-12:45am | F- 10:00am-12:45am
Instructor: Christopher Arledge
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Ethics and Technology

The rapid development of technology and information sharing in the modern age has brought with it significant ethical challenges. In this course, we will utilize predominant ethical theories to critically assess controversial topics such as: privacy in cyberspace, online communities and cyber identities, the morality of genetic enhancement, and the creation of artificial intelligence.

Course Number: AS.150.123.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 11-12:45 | W- 11-12:45 | F- 11-12:45
Instructor: Kathryn Brophy

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Environmental Ethics

Do we have moral obligations to trees? What about rocks? What about rivers, deserts, and mountains? Do nonhuman beings possess rights, regardless of their instrumental or aesthetic value for us? Can humans *oppress* nature, and if so, does it intersect with human-to-human forms of oppression? This introductory course covers some of the classical debates in environmental ethics. Authors we will read include Peter Singer, Also Leopold, Arne Naess, Karen J. Warren, and Vandana Shiva.

Course Number: AS.150.262.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 10:00-1:00PM | W- 10:00-1:00PM | F- 10:00-1:00PM
Instructor: Kevin Powell

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Knowing Ourselves

What is self-knowledge? Is it different from other kinds of knowledge? Is self-knowledge defined by what is known, namely ones self, or by a special way of knowing? Is wanting, believing or thinking something a sufficient condition for me to know that I do? Is self-knowledge something we have or an achievement? What is involved in knowing ourselves better? In this course, we will discuss self-knowledge as a unique relation we each have to ourselves.

Course Number: AS.150.263.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 10am-12pm | W- 10am-12pm | F- 10am-12pm
Instructor: Itai Marom

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Introduction to Food Ethics

Must we ensure that everyone has access to safe food? How ought we regard animals, farmers, and the environment? Is animal consumption supportive of structural sexism, racism, classism? These are important questions with consequences that regularly influence our food choices. This course begins an inquiry via three questions: What is food? Where does food come from? and Who eats food? These questions allow us to peer into the ethical aspects of our relationships to food.

Course Number: AS.150.265.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 11-12:45pm | Th- 11-12:45pm | F- 11-12:45pm
Instructor: David Williams

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Belief in God

Historically, many philosophers have provided interesting but controversial arguments for the existence of God. On the other hand, there is the Problem of Evil: why would a benevolent God create a world that contains such things as the bubonic plague? The question then arises whether it might at least be rationally permissible to believe in God. We will discuss some famous texts from both sides of the debate. No background in philosophy is required.

Course Number: AS.150.271.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 10am-12pm | W- 10am-12pm | F- 10am-12pm
Instructor: Jens Tammo Lossau
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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The Language of Thought

In 1975, Jerry Fodor proposed a novel theory of human cognition: thinking is a computational process that occurs in a mental language. The aim of this course will be to understand Fodor's hypothesis, as well as its implications for scientific and philosophical accounts of the mind. The main reading will be Fodor's The Language of Thought, but we will also look at some critical responses, as well as relevant background developments in psychology and philosophy.

Course Number: AS.150.273.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 1-230pm | Tu- 1-230pm | W- 1-230pm | Th- 1-230pm
Instructor: Palmer Gunderson

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Physics & Astronomy

We offer a number of intersession courses in introductory astronomy this year. They may be of special interest to students considering taking 171.118, Stars and the Universe, this year because that course, usually offered in the spring semester, will not be offered in Spring 2014.

Exploring the Building Blocks of the Universe

Ever wonder what everything is made of at the smallest level? What is dark matter? What is causing the universe to accelerate? These are some of the questions that physicists at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN are trying to answer. In this course, you'll get hands on experience looking at real LHC data while learning about the current theory of particle physics and the inner workings of the LHC.

Course Number: AS.171.111.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 10am-12pm | W- 10am-12pm | F- 10am-12pm
Instructor: Alice Cocoros
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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The magic of physics: What happens next

Each class will introduce a Physics phenomenon which students will explore by designing and building an experiment in groups. No prior physics knowledge or textbook is required. Background material will be available online in the form of videos, worksheets, websites, etc. to help students prepare for their experiments. For example "Mini-weapons of mass destruction" lab will be motivated by an open ended question such as: How can we know and optimize the distance of a projectile? The lab will end with a student-led discussion of the physical phenomena observed and the concepts and theory behind them will be further explained by the instructor. Students will work on group presentations for the class. These can be traditional slides or any other interactive media such as videos, interviews, etc. The final examination will be a group final project on a topic previously agreed upon with the instructor

Course Number: AS.171.129.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 11:00am-2:00pm | Tu- 11:00am-2:00pm | F- 11:00am-2:00pm
Instructor: Maria Pia Valdivia Leiva
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Math Methods of Introductory Physics

Introductory physics courses rely heavily on a handful of mathematical concepts to express abstract ideas and calculate results based on theories. A strong working knowledge of this math provides deeper insight to concepts in physics as well as greater familiarity with calculation. This course will provide an overview of basic ideas in vector calculus (including multi-dimensional calculus), differential equations, and complex numbers as applied to intro-level mechanics and electromagnetism.

Course Number: AS.171.222.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  W- 1-330pm | F- 1-330pm
Instructor: Nick Eminizer

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Simulating Nature: An Intro to Large Scale Computing

A single raindrop contains ~10^22 atoms but few problems with three or more particles can be solved by hand. High performance computing gives researchers the ability to simulate billions of atoms and numerically solve otherwise intractable problems. This course gives students an interactive introduction to using supercomputers to simulate matter at the atomic scale and analyze the resulting behavior with Python. Students will learn the basic skills of a computational scientist and use them to explore applications in engineering, biology, and physics. No programming experience required or expected.

Course Number: AS.171.325.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: N E
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 10am-12p | Tu- 10am-12p | Th- 10am-12p
Instructors: Joel Clemmer Clemmer and Joe Monti

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Political Science

US Foreign Policy toward South Asia

This course will examine U.S. foreign policy towards South Asia from the period spanning the September 11th terror attacks to the present day. It will introduce students to the major issues in U.S. foreign relations with the South Asia during this period, with particular focus on the nations of India and Pakistan. The course will look critically at the way U.S. foreign policy towards South Asia has developed and evolved, what major influences have shaped that policy, and how past developments have impacted present issues and problems. The course will also consider how approaches that the United States has pursued toward India and Pakistan have related to broader American interests and objectives such as the non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, combating terrorism, promoting democracy, stemming the growth of Islamic extremism, stabilizing Afghanistan, and managing the rise of an ascendant China.

Course Number: AS.191.223.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 10:15am-12:30PM | Th- 10:15am-12:30PM
Instructor: Ronak Desai, JD

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Gentrify This! B'More & Urban Policy

This course examines gentrification as policy and as social concern. Students will study its local and national history; explore the role of race, class, and gender in urban revitalization policies; and present a theoretical framework for understanding these policy decisions. Content includes: discussion of contemporary gentrification efforts through analysis of urban politics theory & history; written memos exploring how researchers study the city; & policy walking tours of Waverly, Roland Park & Remington.

Course Number: AS.191.249.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 1-330pm | Th- 1-330pm
Instructor: Sarah Lawton

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IR and the American Civil War

Together, we will explore the origins, contours, and grand strategies of the American Civil War through the lens of international relations. Despite its exceptional origins, the American Union falls into a catastrophic civil war, which ends with the conquest of one regional section by another and fundamentally changes the constitution. Topics include: the expansionary causes of disunion, the character of military forces, the foreign policies of north and south, and international perceptions of the conflict.

Course Number: AS.191.281.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 6:30-8:45 | W- 6:30-8:45 | Th- 6:30-8:45
Instructor: Ryan Fried

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Elections & Political Behavior in New Democracies

This course provides an introduction to elections, political behavior, and public opinion in new and developing democracies. Topics include electoral rules, political party organization, and how socio-economic and demographic factors shape party attachment and voting behavior. The course will also examine why programmatic platforms are sometimes pursued instead of patronage or vote buying strategies. Finally, students will develop the skills to analyze public opinion (and other survey) data as they relate to these topics.

Course Number: AS.191.300.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 9-11:30 | Th- 9-11:30
Instructor: Zack Zimbalist

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International Relations Theory through Manga

This course aims to introduce students to some of the debates and literature in the discipline of International Relations through the use of graphic novels/manga. We will be using a number of graphic novels to illustrate the different questions raised in the literature. Each week we will tackle particular questions about politics and examine the different types of answers available in the academic literature as well as the fictive universe. By the end of this course students should be familiar with various concepts, approaches, and debates in the field of International Relations. Students should be able to view the same problem using different frameworks and to think critically about the consequences of different assumptions for framing a similar problem. Students should also be able to put works of fiction in conversation with contemporary political challenges.

Course Number: AS.191.349.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 4-6pm | W- 4-6pm | F- 4-6pm
Instructor: Tarek Tutunji
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Understanding Modern Mexico: the Paradox of Reform

This course explores the origins and nature of the diverse challenges facing contemporary Mexico including violence, corruption, weak democratic institutions, uneven economic growth, and a complicated relationship with the United States by examining the evolution of its political and economic institutions from the Mexican Revolution to the present. A core question underlying the course is why these problems persist despite the remarkable political and economic reforms undertaken since the 1990s.

Course Number: AS.191.390.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 11-12:45 | W- 11-12:45 | F- 11-12:45
Instructor: Theodore Kahn

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Psychological & Brain Sciences

Introduction to Scientific Computing for Non-Engineers

Introductory course into scientific computing. Students will obtain basic computing skills, including familiarity with computing concepts and terms, the Python programming language, and utilizing open-source, collaborative tools. Lectures will integrate instructor-led lessons and hands-on tutorials. Specifically, the course has two goals: (1) introduce students to computational concepts and computer code design and structure; and (2) explain how to use programs and libraries built by others, how to structure code, and how to display your work.

Course Number: AS.200.102.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: Q
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 11-1:30 | W- 11-1:30
Instructors: Kevin Himberger and Vyash Puliyadi

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Profiling Mentally Ill Mass Murderers

Mass Shootings by mentally ill are a scourge upon society. Factors like easy access to guns by dangerous mentally ill, inadequate commitment laws, the inability to predict dangerous behavior, and media frenzy, contribute to an increasing death toll. This course uses case studies to highlight the role played by diagnostic assessment (suicide by cop, psychopathic behavior, PTSD, major mental disorders), inadequate prevention civil and gun policy strategies, and stigmatization of the mentally ill as dangerous.

Course Number: AS.200.142.22
Credits: 2
Distribution: H S
Days:  Tuesday 1/16/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 11-2:45 | Tu- 11-2:45 | Th- 11-2:45 | F- 11-2:45
Instructor: Lawrence Raifman

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Public Health Studies

I Have my Public Health Degree, so now what???

The goal of the course is to introduce students to and enthuse them about the vast array of public health practice careers, as well as foster individual career growth and development. THE COURSE WILL INCLUDE TWO ALL DAY FIELD TRIPS TO PUBLIC HEALTH AGENCIES, NON-PROFITS, PRIVATE SECTOR, AND COMMUNITY BASED ORGANIZATIONS IN D.C. AND BALTIMORE SCHEDULED FOR JAN 24th & 25th. A mandatory trip meeting and resume workshop will be held in early December in the Career Center Library, Garland Hall, 3rd floor. Course/trip attendees made by faculty selection and applications will be due to the JHU Career Center on Friday, November 17, 2017 by 11:59 PM. D.C. and Baltimore trip dates Jan. 24th & 25th.

Course Number: AS.280.207.31
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/22/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 1-3:30pm | Tu- 1-3:30pm | W- all day | Th- all day | F- 1-3:30pm
Instructor: Katherine Henry

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Sexually Transmitted Infections - Pub Health Exercise

This course introduces students to an overview of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) with a focus on upstream interventions by applying the public health problem-solving paradigm. To simulate the real world, students are divided into small groups to tackle a STI problem in the community and demonstrate the mastery of public health concepts by successfully collaborating on a final paper with a descriptive analysis of an STI, its magnitude and determinants, exploration of the different intervention strategies and a defense of the intervention of choice.

Course Number: AS.280.208.12
Credits: 2
Distribution: N S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/19/2018
Times:  M - 830am-1245pm | Tu- 830am-1245pm | Th- 830am-1245pm | F- 830am-1245pm
Instructor: Kenny Mok
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Public Health and Military Policy

How do U.S. military activities affect global and domestic public health? The course will explore the perspective that specific policies governing U.S. military activities exert broad influence on the public's health, both in peace and war, and that in better understanding these influences, students will be positioned to recognize their significance in various public health settings, including international health, drug and vaccine development, and in the provision of mental health care to U.S. veterans.

Course Number: AS.280.213.11
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/12/2018
Times:  M - 9:00am-12:15PM | Tu- 9:00am-12:15PM | Th- 9:00am-12:15PM | F- 9:00am-12:15PM
Instructor: Remington Nevin
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Health in Complex Humanitarian Emergencies

Health in Complex Humanitarian Emergencies (CHE) introduces students to the fundamentals of humanitarian response. This course explores a range of topics including: gender and vulnerable populations; war and health; refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs); infectious diseases; water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH); risk communications; and food security and agriculture. This course also examines the unique challenges of Global Climate Change, health systems reconstruction in Haiti, and the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. All topics are presented in the context of disaster response, and students are provided the opportunity to learn new skills and apply them to the complex issues posed by humanitarian emergencies.

Course Number: AS.280.218.11
Credits: 1
Distribution: N S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/12/2018
Times:  M - 3pm-645pm | Tu- 3pm-645pm | W- 3pm-645pm | Th- 3pm-645pm
Instructor: Jeffrey Freeman
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Breaking in Baltimore: HIV & AIDS

Breaking in Baltimore is a week-long immersion experience where students explore social justice issues by engaging greater Baltimore through direct service and educational sessions. The HIV/AIDS program explores Baltimore's healthcare infrastructure and the challenges facing diagnosed and vulnerable Baltimoreans. Students will participate in classroom sessions as well as service learning projects in greater Baltimore with local agencies. Student participation begins the morning of Saturday, January 20 and runs through noon on Friday, January 26. Students must participate full-time, including living in the off-campus retreat center and participating in some evening programming. Students must apply through Center For Social Concern--applications will be live at http://studentaffairs.jhu.edu/socialconcern/programs/alternative-breaks/ by mid-October. Fee: Approx. $175, covering lodging, meals, and program expenses for the week. Financial aid is available

Course Number: AS.280.219.31
Credits: 2
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/22/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - off campus | Tu- off campus | W- off campus | Th- off campus | F- off campus
Instructor: Abigail Neyenhouse

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Setting Priorities for Global Disease Surveillance

This course will provide students with an understanding of the challenges faced by public health professionals and policy makers in their efforts to prioritize infectious diseases for surveillance, preparedness and response activities. Following a series of introductory lectures, students will participate in a simulated Emerging Infectious Disease (EID) prioritization workshop, utilizing the prioritization Tool developed by the One Health Office at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Course Number: AS.280.228.11
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/12/2018
Times:  M - 11-2 | Tu- 11-2 | W- 11-2 | Th- 11-2 | F- 11-2
Instructor: Cassidy Rist
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Cancer Related Health Behaviors and Disparities

This course will explore behaviors related to cancer prevention and control. Students will gain a basic understanding of cancer etiology and descriptive epidemiology. Additional topics will include primary and secondary cancer prevention strategies, drawing from recent research, including studies currently being conducted at the National Cancer Institute. Students will also learn about disparities in cancer prevention behaviors. Multiple learning formats will promote student learning and introduce different tools for behavioral cancer prevention research.

Course Number: AS.280.233.21
Credits: 1
Distribution: Q S
Days:  Tuesday 1/16/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 1:00pm-3:30pm | Th- 1:00pm-3:30pm | F- 1:00pm-3:30pm
Instructors: Minal Patel and Melinda Krakow
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Mental Health and Illness in Film

Mental health and illness are of great public health importance. Movies and TV shows are how many Americans learn about mental disorders. This class will expose students to hallmark films featuring mental health issues and encourage discussion of how film and media's portrayal of mental illness influences public mental health. Students will become critical consumers of film and media in their portrayal of mental illness as they become familiar with the characteristics and symptoms of common mental illnesses.

Course Number: AS.280.234.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: N S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 1-2:45pm | W- 1-2:45pm | Th- 1-2:45pm
Instructor: Jennifer Hansen
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Public Health Cardiology

This course will provide a hands on overview of the modern science behind cardiovascular disease. Topics will include the epidemiology of cardiovascular disease, prevention, interventions and risk factors that impact outcomes. Students will learn hands on skills to recognize and treat heart attacks including basic ECG recognition, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and current treatment algorithms.

Course Number: AS.280.235.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: N S
Days:  Monday 1/22/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 4pm-745pm | Tu- 4pm-745pm | W- 4pm-745pm | Th- 4pm-745pm
Instructor: Andrew Rosenblum

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Mental Health and the Gut

Mental Health and the Gut is a course that will review the strong, bidirectional communication between the gastrointestinal tract and the brain. Specifically, we will cover the role of the microbiome in shaping brain health, the link between gastrointestinal symptoms and mental health, and new and seminal research on the brain-gut connection in specific psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, depression, and autism spectrum disorders.

Course Number: AS.280.236.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: N S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/19/2018
Times:  M - 10am-1pm | W- 10am-1pm | F- 10am-1pm
Instructor: Calliope Holingue

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The rising epidemic: non-infectious diseases in Africa

This multidisciplinary course will discuss the emergence of major non-infectious diseases (e.g., heart disease, diabetes, and certain cancers), as leading causes of death and disability in Africa. We will examine the influence of demographic aging, and globalization as important drivers of the epidemic; the social, health, and economic costs of these conditions; as well as national policies aimed at prevention and control of these conditions in selected countries.

Course Number: AS.280.237.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/19/2018
Times:  M - 10am-1pm | W- 10am-1pm | F- 10am-1pm
Instructor: Adaeze Wosu

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Trauma, Mindfulness, and Yoga in Public Health

Adversity and trauma are widespread, affecting two-thirds of US adults and greater numbers globally. This course applies a public health lens to examine how adversity affects health across the life course. Students will learn the definitions, incidence, prevalence, historical trends, causes and effects, and disparities associated with adverse childhood events (ACEs) and trauma. The class will also examine evidence-based mindfulness and yoga approaches to address ACEs and trauma, and research methods to assess their impacts.

Course Number: AS.280.238.11
Credits: 1
Distribution: H N S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/12/2018
Times:  Tu- 1-4:45 | W- 1-4:45 | Th- 1-4:45 | F- 1-4:45
Instructor: Kristina (Gia) Naranjo-Rivera
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Pharmaceuticals and Global Health

This seminar-style course will focus on three different major areas that pharmaceuticals play in global healthcare issues, starting with prescription drug accessibility in the US and abroad, antimicrobial resistance and One Health, and the opioid epidemic and how policies in different countries are enacted, and play into the management of the epidemic. We will discuss these issues through the lenses of various stakeholders, including government, Pharma, and more.

Course Number: AS.280.239.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 11am-1pm | W- 11am-1pm | F- 11am-1pm
Instructor: Kinari Shah
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Theatre Arts and Studies

Dance Composition

An introductory course in the applied study of the art and craft of composing dances, emphasizing the creation and performance of solo dances. Students create short studies specific to developing their creative skills, understanding choreographic tools, and use of the elements of dance - space, time, and energy - as they learn to productively discuss, evaluate and give feedback while deepening their knowledge of the practice, theory, and art of dance composition.

Course Number: AS.225.235.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 1-3:30 | Th- 1-3:30
Instructor: Constance Dinapoli
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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New York City Theatre Intensive

*(Open to All Majors)* January 9-12, 2018 students will attend Broadway and/or Off-Broadway plays and musicals in New York City, including the Come From Away by Irene Carl Sankoff, David Hein, the new musical The Band's Visit by David Yazbek & Itamar Moses, Once on This Island by Lynn Ahrens, and a play (TBD) The class will meet before and after each performance (occasionally meeting one of the artists). Each student will keep a journal to be collected at the end of the class. Lodging is available or you can commute from your NJ/NY/CT location. Students must apply to be accepted to this class and a $250 non-refundable deposit is required to secure a slot. ****Class starts on Tuesday, January 9th****

Course Number: AS.225.305.60
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/12/2018
Times:  Tu- off campus | W- off campus | Th- off campus | F- off campus
Instructor: Margaret Denithorne

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Writing Seminars

This and That: New Cross-Genre Writing

The course will consider works that bring different genres - poetry, memoir, collage, criticism, comics, painting - together in the same book. As readers, we'll discuss issues of interpretation, and as artists, we'll discuss craft and process. Students' work in the course will culminate in a self-directed project that may take the form of a zine / pamphlet / broadside / etc. Artists we will read include Lynda Barry, Anne Carson, and Claudia Rankine, and two local artists will visit the class to perform their work and give a short talk.

Course Number: AS.220.110.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 1-2:45 | W- 1-2:45 | Th- 1-2:45
Instructor: Jessica Hudgins

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Poetry and the City

In this course, we will read and write poems that observe, critique and imaginatively engage with urban life. Readings will include poetry by Walt Whitman, Federico García Lorca, Jamaal May, Gwendolyn Brooks and others. We will also explore works in other genres, from nonfiction to photography to film. Off-campus events and texts by Baltimore authors will help us ground our work in the city around us.

Course Number: AS.220.111.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 11-2:45 | Th- 11-12:45 | F- 11-12:45
Instructor: John Allen

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Reading and Writing Ghost Stories

This course will investigate the literary tradition of ghost stories: what is a ghost story, how does it work, and why does it affect us so strongly? We will study a range of authors, from early practitioners like Henry James to contemporary writers like Karen Russell. We will discuss ways of analyzing the ghost story and translate our observations into techniques for our own writing. Students will write and workshop their own ghostly short stories.

Course Number: AS.220.112.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 11-12:45 | W- 11-12:45 | F- 11-12:45
Instructor: Isabella Martin

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Writing Fantastical Fiction

While fiction is by definition not "real," some modes of fiction present deliberate departures from the world as we know it. This class will examine fantastical and non-realist writing, including surrealist and magic realist stories, as well as works with fairy-tale and folklore influences, and stories with elements of the uncanny or supernatural. Students will read and discuss representative fiction, including stories by Angela Carter, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Haruki Murakami, and Joyce Carol Oates. Students will complete weekly creative assignments, and participate in the workshop of a final, full-length piece.

Course Number: AS.220.128.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 1030am-1215pm | W- 1030am-1215pm | Th- 1030am-1215pm
Instructor: Shannon Robinson

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Sports Writing

Writers from all backgrounds and genres have long been drawn to sports. Sports come with built-in conflicts, and often with social or political relevance. Yet sports writing also presents a challenge. One need only read a newspaper story on the latest Orioles contest to realize that straightforward accounts rarely make for compelling reading. In this course, we will learn what techniques make sports writing successful, and how to emulate those techniques in our own work.

Course Number: AS.220.172.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 11am-1pm | W- 11am-1pm | F- 11am-1pm
Instructor: Michael Mingo

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Podcast Bootcamp

In an era of political unrest, podcasts have become a powerful means of expressing personal voices and generating civil discourse. As a collaboration between the Writing Seminars and the Digital Media Center, the Podcast Bootcamp presents students with an intensive, weeklong introduction to creating podcasts. Students will learn techniques of recording, editing, producing, and marketing audio works while cultivating skills of critical listening and analysis based on a wide range of modes and genres. Class will meet in the Digital Media Center (Mattin 226) from 10 a.m. to noon, and students will continue audio production work in the DMC through the afternoon.

Course Number: AS.220.173.31
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/22/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 10-12, 1-5 | Tu- 10-12, 1-5 | W- 10-12, 1-5 | Th- 10-12, 1-5 | F- 10-12, 1-5
Instructors: Kyle Stine and Joan Freedman

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At the Condensery: Reading and Writing Short Poems

In her poem "Poet's Work," Lorine Niedecker says the trade of poets is to "sit at desk/ and condense.". In this course, we will trace an abridged history of short poems (defined as having fewer than fourteen lines) in English, from Ben Jonson to Emily Dickinson to 20th and 21st century poets such as W.C. Williams, Langston Hughes, Michael Longley, and Jean Valentine. We will think about the traits and limits of short poems, and strategies for writing good ones. Students will write free verse as well as poems in forms such as haiku, rispetto, shadorma, limerick, nonet, and erasure. The final portfolio will include short poems as well as three (short, of course) essays.

Course Number: AS.220.175.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  Tu- 1-3:30 | Th- 1-3:30
Instructor: Hannah Shea

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Word and Image in Social Discourse

How can we respond to propaganda with statements of enduring value? In a world of fake news and in the face of looming international conflict, this course seeks to present lyric poetry and photography as truth-seeking tools. Starting with the rise of American poetry in the Civil War period (poets Dickinson and Whitman; photographers Mathew Brady and Alexander Gardner) and continuing through the present day, we will study attempts to humanize broad social and political conflicts. Finally, through our own poems and smartphone photographs, we will try to make sense of the violence that currently pervades American and international discourse. Writing Intensive

Course Number: AS.220.176.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/8/2018 - Friday 1/26/2018
Times:  M - 545-930pm | W- 545-930pm | Th- 545-930pm
Instructor: Songmuang Greer

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Johns Hopkins University

“. . .Courses are designed to provide you with an intensive in-class experience followed by a trip allowing you to explore the career field of choice up close.”