Intersession Programs at Johns Hopkins
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Africana Studies

Black to the Future: Intro to Afrofuturism

Exploring the work of artists and scholars throughout the Black diaspora, this course introduces students to the aesthetic of Afrofuturism, which uses elements of speculative fiction and non-Western cosmologies to both critique the present-day dilemmas of Black people and re-examine historical events of the past.

Course Number: AS.362.108.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/20/2017
Times:  M - 1-4pm | W- 1-4pm | Th- 1-4pm
Instructor: Bryan Carter
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Anthropology

Minding the Body: Disciplines of Athlete, Inmate, Monk

In this course we use anthropological modes of inquiry to examine the disciplinary regimes and embodied dispositions of athletes, prisoners, and monks to better think through our everyday encounter with body and mind. By examining sports, incarceration, and monasticism (including nuns) we interrogate "totalizing" systems of ethics and ethical self-work that present intricate and shifting configurations of mind and body through complex and sometimes competing ideas of health, fitness, piety, discipleship, gender, rehabilitation, or security.

Course Number: AS.070.246.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/17/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  W- 8:45am-12pm | F- 8:45am-12pm
Instructor: Thomas Thornton

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Who is a Refugee?

What does it mean to be a "refugee"? Who gets to "count" as a refugee, how is this decided, and by whom? And what implications does the refugee label have for the people who come into contact with this category? This course approaches the modern figure(s) of the refugee through anthropology. The course will tie in current events to grapple with how anthropology can help us question popular discourses and representations of refugees. We will end with talks from organizations responsible for refugee resettlement in Baltimore to learn about the local dynamics of refugee policies.

Course Number: AS.070.269.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 1-3:15pm | Th- 1-3:15pm
Instructors: Anna Wherry and Elmirasadat Alihosseini
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Alexandria, City of Nostalgia

The course focuses on how different generations of writers, poets and filmmakers have portrayed the cosmopolitan past of Alexandria, the famous Mediterranean city, throughout the 20th century. It centers around different registers of nostalgia between European and Egyptian authors emphasizing how the city's cosmopolitan past continues to shape the residents' imagination of its present. We will engage with a range of texts and films that depict communal encounters between Europeans and locals at the time.

Course Number: AS.070.280.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 1-3:30pm | Tu- 1-3:30pm | Th- 1-3:30pm | F- 1-3:30pm
Instructor: Fouad Halbouni
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Applied Math and Statistics

A Hands-On Introduction to Matlab

This is an introductory course in programming MATLAB for students in the mathematical sciences. MATLAB is widely used in research and industry for numerical calculations, plotting of functions and data, and the creation of user interfaces. Short tutorial lectures will be followed by problem solving sessions. Topics emphasized will be basic programming in the MATLAB environment and the practical solution of problems in matrix calculations, interpolation, numerical integration and optimization.

Course Number: EN.550.282.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: Q
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 1-3:30 pm | Th- 1-3:30 pm
Instructor: Tianyu Ding
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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A Hands-On Introduction to Matlab

This is an introductory course in programming MATLAB for students in the mathematical sciences. MATLAB is widely used in research and industry for numerical calculations, plotting of functions and data, and the creation of user interfaces. Short tutorial lectures will be followed by problem solving sessions. Topics emphasized will be basic programming in the MATLAB environment and the practical solution of problems in matrix calculations, interpolation, numerical integration and optimization.

Course Number: EN.550.282.14
Credits: 1
Distribution: Q
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 4-6:30pm | Th- 4-6:30pm
Instructor: Tianyu Ding
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Introduction to R

This is an introductory course in R for both undergraduate and graduate students. R is a programming language and software environment that provides a wide variety of statistical and graphical techniques, including linear and nonlinear modeling, classical statistical tests, time-series analysis, etc. We will discuss data structures, data entry and manipulation, graphical procedures, statistical models, and programming in R. No previous programming experience is required.

Course Number: EN.550.283.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: Q
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  W- 1-3:30 pm | F- 1-3:30 pm
Instructor: Chenqi Fu
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Introduction to Scientific Programming in Python

This is an introductory course in programming python for students in the mathematical sciences. Short tutorial lectures will be followed by problem solving sessions. Topics emphasized will include linear algebra problems, ordinary differential equations and optimization. Also a particular interest will be given to practical machine learning problems (classification, regression and clustering).

Course Number: EN.550.285.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: Q
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  W- 10am-12:30pm | F- 10am-12:30pm
Instructor: Long Wang
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Introduction to Mathematica

This is an introductory course in Mathematica for undergraduate and graduate students in the mathematical sciences. Mathematica is a powerful, user-friendly computer algebra system used throughout academia and industry for mathematical modeling, experimentation, creating interactive visualizations, and symbolic manipulation. We will explore these functionalities while mastering the fundamentals of computing with Mathematica. Additional topics will include data mining, network analysis, and procedural programming.

Course Number: EN.550.286.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: Q
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 3pm-5:30pm | Th- 3pm-5:30pm
Instructor: Joshua Cape
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Art

The Art of Infrastructure

Networks of infrastructure surround us: invisible, pervasive, and essential to modern life. Our project in this course will be to begin to see the arcane complexities that underlie our simplest acts (as well as the highest ambitions of architects and civil engineers). We will eat, to learn about the infrastructures of food; we will travel, to learn about routes; we will explore water and power and the myriad of dependencies that make things tick. Then we will make (beautiful) maps.

Course Number: AS.371.175.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: H E
Days:  Monday 1/17/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 1-4:15pm | Th- 1-4:15pm
Instructor: Charles Phinney
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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B'More: Seeing Baltimore with a Camera - Beyond Tourism

This course is for freshmen ONLY. This course will be an introduction to various neighborhoods of Baltimore through the eye of a camera. Students will be introduced to the concept of photography as an artistic medium for documenting a city's cultural life (e.g. architectural, musical, social, historical) through a mixture of classroom lectures and field trips to Baltimore neighborhoods: Federal Hill, Hampden, Mt. Vernon and Fells Point and visits to the Peabody Library, the Walters Art Museum, SPCA and a photo studio. Each student will create a small body of work that reflects their interests, point of view and photographic skills.

Course Number: AS.371.188.33
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/23/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 10am-4:30pm | Tu- 10am-4:30pm | W- 10am-4:30pm | Th- 10am-4:30pm | F- 10am-4:30pm
Instructor: Howard Ehrenfeld

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B'More: Charm City Thru the Lens

This course is for freshmen ONLY. In this course we'll analyze and discuss the work of master photographers from Baltimore and beyond. Students will be introduced to the concept of photography and cinematography as an aesthetic medium for documenting a city's cultural life. We will also discuss the intersection between camera basics (e.g. ISO, aperture, shutter speed) and visual perception and cognition. Classroom lectures and workshops will be complemented by visits to Federal Hill, Mt. Vernon, Bolton Hill, and Fells Point. Using their own digital and/or cell phone cameras, students will have the opportunity to create their own photographic and/or motion picture portfolios to present to the class.

Course Number: AS.371.189.33
Distribution: H
Days:  
Times:  M - 10am-4:30pm | Tu- 10am-4:30pm | W- 10am-4:30pm | Th- 10am-4:30pm | F- 10am-4:30pm
Instructor: Monica Lopez-Gonzalez
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Biology

4D Biology: Seeing is Believing

The field of biology is currently undergoing a revolution, driven in part by technological advancements in tissue engineering and microscopy. Scientists can now culture organs and engineer tissues outside of the body, and visualize them with unprecedented spacial (3D) and temporal resolution (3D+Time=4D). This course will teach students how experiments are designed to identify functions of genes, mechanisms of development and disease, and exiting novel therapeutics. We will discuss the successive steps involved 4D biology in the order in which they would occur in a research lab: review of tissue and organ 3D culture techniques; review of genetic engineering methods; live imaging session (lab visit); quantitative image analysis with dedicated software (hands-on session); and finally making a novel conclusion that goes into the next generation's biology textbook. This will be an introduction to both the mindset and the toolkit of the 21st century biologist.

Course Number: AS.020.173.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 1-4pm | Th- 1-4pm | F- 1-4pm
Instructor: Dan Georgess
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Introduction to Human Anatomy & Physiology

This class aims to provide background in anatomy and physiology to help students in their initial training in medical school. Lectures will cover the correlation between human anatomy and physiology using relevant clinical cases that exemplify the interconnections between anatomy and physiology in the physio-pathological context. The course is intended to provide students with a foundation for knowledge in the structures and processes relevant to medical science.

Course Number: AS.020.208.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 9-11:15am | W- 9-11:15am | Th- 9-11:15am | F- 9-11:15am
Instructors: Dorhyun Johng and Gonzalo Fernandez Torga
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Reading and Tweeting Science

In this course, students will learn to decipher and summarize primary scientific articles. As they uncover the structure of these complicated texts, students will gain the necessary tools to decode difficult articles--even those from unfamiliar fields of study. Because communication is a key aspect of scientific inquiry, students will learn to summarize results as well as full articles by writing 140-character tweets and longer form abstracts.

Course Number: AS.020.233.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 1-3:30pm | Th- 1-3:30pm
Instructor: Emily Fisher

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Introductory RNA-seq Analysis using R

Students in this course will learn how to analyze and interpret next-generation sequencing data using tools based in R, a statistical programming language. Starting with tabular data containing gene abundance measurements from RNA-seq experiments, students will perform exploratory and comparative analyses. The final capstone project involves developing original, reproducible analyses in an elegant report. No previous programming experience is required.

Course Number: AS.020.235.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 2:00-3:50pm | W- 2:00-3:50pm | F- 2:00-3:50pm
Instructors: Katherine Cox and Rosa Alcazar
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Techniques in Molecular Biology & Biochemistry

Most of the students who come for undergraduate programs in biological sciences are not familiar with the important techniques used in the field of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Aim of this course is to fill that gap and make their concepts clearer and stronger so that in this era, they are able to troubleshoot and improve their experimental outcomes.

Course Number: AS.020.237.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 10am-12:15pm | W- 10am-12:15pm | F- 10am-12:15pm
Instructor: RICHA TYAGI
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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The Biology of Cancer Metastasis

The Biology of Cancer Metastasis is a course that covers the basic biological tenets and theories of how cancer forms and advances and how cancer spreads “ or metastasizes“ throughout the body and causes the demise of cancer patients. In particular, we will cover the steps of metastasis, the routes of cancer spread, the homing of cancer cells to specific secondary sites in the body, and various treatment strategies for metastatic cancer.

Course Number: AS.020.246.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 1-2:45pm | W- 1-2:45pm | F- 1-2:45pm
Instructor: Kenneth Valkenburg
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Foreign Gene Expression Laboratory

This laboratory will introduce molecular cloning techniques that allow bacteria to be used to produce a particular gene product. Recombinant plasmids, carrying a fusion protein gene, will be constructed and used to transform competent E. coli, and the gene products isolated. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. The lab will meet 9 am to noon and 1-2 pm, Monday-Friday for the three weeks of intersession. Freshmen preferred. Biology majors given priority.

Course Number: AS.020.296.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 9am-12pm; 1-2pm | Tu- 9am-12pm; 1-2pm | W- 9am-12pm; 1-2pm | Th- 9am-12pm; 1-2pm | F- 9am-12pm; 1-2pm
Instructor: Robert Horner
Syllabus: Download (.doc)
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Science in Hollywood: Fact or Fiction

In this class we will combine the fantasy of cinema with the realism of modern science. Films often require some scientific explanation to lend credibility to the plot. Sometimes their explanations are simplified versions of real research; other times the science is stretched so far the science fiction turns to comedy. There is a wide variety of science in cinema; we will focus our discussion on cell biology and genetics. Students will appreciate the role of cinema as a form of scientific communication, learn advanced genomics and cell biology concepts and debate the ethics and public policy surrounding them.

Course Number: AS.020.301.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 10am-12:15pm | W- 10am-12:15pm | F- 10am-12:15pm
Instructor: Rebecca Keener
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Fundamentals of Biological Electron Microscopy

Introduction to the principles, practice, and application of electron microscopy (EM) to biological/cell biological research. The course will cover electron optical theory; instrumentation design, use, and applications; and will afford students 'hands-on' experience in both specimen preparation and electron microscope operation (including both transmission and scanning electron microscopes).

Course Number: AS.020.397.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 11-11:50am | W- 11-11:50am; 1-3 | Th- 11-11:50am | F- 11-11:50am; 1-3
Instructor: J. McCaffery
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Biomedical Engineering

Intellectual Property Primer for Scientists and Engineers: Patents, Copyrights and Trademarks

The course will outline the basics of intellectual property laws with an emphasis on practical aspects of protection of IP for scientists and engineers. Most of the course will cover the basics of patent law, but introductions will also be given to trademarks and copyrights. Specific problems in the areas of biotechnology, computer science and the Internet will also be highlighted. It is hoped that the attendees will obtain a basic understanding of how intellectual property is protected. No prior legal background is required.

Course Number: EN.580.105.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/17/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 6pm-8pm | W- 6pm-8pm | Th- 6pm-8pm | F- 6pm-8pm
Instructor: Joerg-Uwe Szipl

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Immunoengineering: A New Frontier

What therapy could cure debilitating diseases such as cancer, HIV, allergies, diabetes, Alzheimers, or influenza? Engineers and Immunologists are attempting to create this with your body's own immune system. Understanding how these therapies work, how they might work in the future, and how to apply engineering principles to enhance these therapies will be the focus of this course.

Course Number: EN.580.107.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: E
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 10-11:45am | W- 10-11:45am | F- 10-11:45am
Instructor: John Hickey
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Introduction to Research Laboratory Skills

This course aims to familiarize first-year undergraduates with the basic lab skills necessary to work in a wet-lab. Specific skills covered will include pipetting, microscopy, PCR, gel electrophoresis, basic cell culture, and more! This hands-on experience will fully immerse students in the basics of laboratory research and should help prepare students looking for research or internship opportunities in the upcoming spring or summer semester.

Course Number: EN.580.117.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: N E
Days:  Monday 1/17/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 9-10am;10am-6pm | W- 9-10am;10am-6pm | F- 9-10am;10am-6pm
Instructor: Eileen Haase
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Advances in Immunoengineering

In this course we will first discuss the immune system, focusing on understanding differences between the innate and adaptive portions. We will then explore engineering of immunotherapies including the use antibodies, engineered cells, vaccines and biomaterials for stimulating or suppressing the immune system. We will conclude the course by discussing future directions of immunoengineering research, including some of the work being done at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

Course Number: EN.580.126.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: E
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 10am-12:30pm | Tu- 10am-12:30pm | Th- 10am-12:30pm | F- 10am-12:30pm
Instructors: David Wilson and Randall Meyer
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Software Development for Scientists and Engineers

This course is focused on teaching researchers in science, engineering, medicine, and related fields core computing skills needed to perform research more efficiently. This course will teach basic programming in MATLAB and Python, using the unix shell, version control, data management, and data visualization. Lessons will alternate with hands-on practical sessions.

Course Number: EN.580.127.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  W- 9-11:15am | F- 9-11:15am
Instructor: Kimberly Chan
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Prometheus et al: the Ethics and Business of Regen Med

Primarily dealing with the process of recent advances in regenerative medicine, this course will focus on the interweaving of ethics, business, and science in recent issues and news (e.g. face transplants, Prop 71, FDA regulations, the stress-induced stem cell hoax, organ transplants, clinical trials of lab grown organs) and the practical applications of those interweavings on the students' future careers. The course will also cover the common ethical frameworks, emerging economic factors, and considerations of both donor consent and donor rights.

Course Number: EN.580.215.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: E S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 1-4:15pm | W- 1-4:15pm | F- 1-4:15pm
Instructors: Ethan Nyberg and Justin Lowenthal
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Introduction to Synthetic Biology

This course aims to make students familiar with the basic concepts in the field of synthetic biology. An overview of artificial and reengineered biological devices, perspectives, and ethical implications will be presented. Fundamental engineering principles of modularity, standardization, and abstraction hierarchy will be covered. The design of a subset of nucleic acid, protein-based devices as well artificial cells, tissues, and organisms will be discussed in further detail. Basic techniques used to engineer these synthetic systems will be presented. By the end of the course students will be asked to conceptualize the design of a device of their choice, and their strategy to build such a device.

Course Number: EN.580.216.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 9-11:15am | W- 9-11:15am | F- 9-11:15am
Instructor: Shiva Razavi
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Frontiers in Vascular Tissue Engineering

Tissue engineering is a multifaceted discipline utilizing engineering techniques and biological principles to augment or replace diseased tissues. Incorporating vascular components, which are amenable to host integration and act to direct nutrient, oxygen, and waste exchange, into engineered constructs is pivotal to the success of the field. To this end, this class will explore bench to bedside principles, reviewing the design, characterization, and implementation of vascular tissue engineering research techniques for clinical therapeutic application.

Course Number: EN.580.403.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: E
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 9-10:30am | W- 9-10:30am | F- 9-10:30am
Instructors: Michael Blatchley and Quinton Smith

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Hands-on Anatomy and Physiology of Rat Routine Surgical

PLEASE NOTE: THIS INTERSESSION COURSE HAS AN ADDITIONAL $100 LAB FEE. This course will introduce in vivo experimental procedures to students. Theoretical lectures will be followed by hands-on tutorials. Students will learn how to execute some of the most common in vivo experimental procedures in rodent models. The course will be approximately 30 theory and 70 supervised hands-on workshop in a laboratory with emphasis on teaching in vivo rodent experimental procedures, rodents' anatomy and physiology.

Course Number: EN.580.406.21
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/17/2017 - Friday 1/20/2017
Times:  Tu- 9am-12:15pm | W- 9am-12:15pm | Th- 9am-12:15pm | F- 9am-12:15pm
Instructor: Angelo ALL
Syllabus: Download (.doc)
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Business Plan Bootcamp and Start-Up Communications

This course is geared towards students who are considering starting companies or applying to Business Plan Competitions as part of a design team/course, or as an independent pursuit. We will discuss the basics of business plans and modes of communication specific to technical start up companies, including strategic partner and investor pitching and technical presentation for a lay audience. Expect to apply what is taught directly to your project/idea, as we will be practicing communicating your ideas and products.

Course Number: EN.580.417.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: E
Days:  Monday 1/17/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 2:30-4pm | W- 2:30-4pm | F- 2:30-4pm
Instructor: Emma Bigelow

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Chemistry

Food Fermentation: Theory & Insight

This course will survey biochemical, microbiological, and practical aspects of food fermentation specifically in regard to beer, wine, and fermented dairy products. Focus will be on connecting desired product traits with the relevant biochemical processes that allow these traits to be developed and controlled. Conversion of raw material to end product, role of microbial populations, flavor development, and defects will be studied. Students will gain a fundamental understanding of food fermentation theory and technology.

Course Number: AS.030.304.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/17/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 1:00-3:15pm | W- 1:00-3:15pm | F- 1:00-3:15pm
Instructor: Benjamin Crane
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Practical NMR Techniques for Routine Research

This course covers practical NMR techniques that are routinely used in research. Topics include NMR hardware, one and two dimensional experiments, solvent suppression, quantitative analysis and kinetics. Basic theory, pulse sequence structure, and key setup parameters of each experiment will be discussed in depth. Advanced processing and analytical methods will also be covered. In addition to lectures, students will get hands-on experience at the spectrometer setting up experiments, acquiring, and processing data.

Course Number: AS.030.440.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: N E
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/20/2017
Times:  Tu- 10am-12:30pm | Th- 10am-12:30pm | F- 10am-12:30pm
Instructor: Joel Tang
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Civil Engineering

Introduction to Numerical Programming for Engineers

This course introduces numerical programming for engineers by using the programming language Python. We first discuss the fundamentals of Python, then we conduct numerical analysis with Python programming, finally we write Python code to solve practical engineering problems. This hands-on course is taught by in-class coding analysis by the instructor, and interactive coding projects by students. No previous programming experience is required.

Course Number: EN.560.333.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: N E
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 1-3:15pm | Th- 1-3:15pm
Instructor: Zhangping Wei
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Computer Aided Drafting for Civil Engineers

This course is primarily designed to introduce computer-aided drafting to engineering students. The course will provide a hands-on drafting experience starting with AutoCad, but will get into other AutoDesk products such as Revit to handle Building Information Modeling (BIM). The focus of the course will be on Civil and Architectural applications, but facilitate learning more modules such as Revit MEP or AutoCad MEP. Students will master 2D drawing and preliminary 3D drawing in AutoCad and will be able to setup a simple building information models via Revit.

Course Number: EN.560.335.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: E
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  W- 9-10:45am | Th- 9-10:45am | F- 9-10:45am
Instructor: Shahabeddin Torabian
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Classics

Cracked Pots and Crack Pots: A History of Greek Vases

This course is an introduction to the study ancient Greek pottery. In addition to remarkable depictions of mythology and daily life, we will consider the who's-who of ancient Greek pottery: ancient painters and potters, and modern scholars and collectors. Daily topics include iconography, manufacture, use, patronage, sales, inscriptions, dating, and connoisseurship. We will make special trips to the JHU-Archaeological Museum and Walters Art Museum to examine Greek pottery in-person.

Course Number: AS.040.143.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 1-2:30pm | Th- 1-2:30pm | F- 1-2:30pm
Instructor: Laura Hutchison
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Cognitive Science

American Dialects

What makes someone from California sound different from someone from Boston? This course seeks to answer this question by examining dialects of American English. This introductory course is designed for anyone interested in language, as the basics of linguistics will be taught. We will then use this knowledge to characterize the features of dialects of American English and to discuss the impact these linguistic features have on the perception of these dialects.

Course Number: AS.050.122.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: N S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/20/2017
Times:  Tu- 10am-12:15pm | W- 10am-12:15pm | F- 10am-12:15pm
Instructor: Emily Atkinson
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Computer Science

Introduction to Connectomics

This course will introduce the emerging field of connectomics, and give students the opportunity to contribute directly to ongoing research efforts within the computer science department. This field enables novel brain circuit analysis at the ultrastructure level (i.e., individual synapses and neurons) and promises insight into areas such as biofidelic algorithms and the validation of the cortical column hypothesis first proposed at JHU by Vernon Mountcastle in the 1960s. We will begin by broadly surveying the field of brain mapping across different scales, and more deeply examine research in MRI-based graphs and ultrastructure electron microscopy reconstruction efforts. Students will learn about scalable algorithms and approaches to extract graphs from large image volumes (O(100 TB+)), and the importance of computer science in addressing modern neuroscience challenges. Programming experience in MATLAB, Python or R is helpful but not required.

Course Number: EN.600.221.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: N E
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 2:45-6pm | Tu- 2:45-6pm | Th- 2:45-6pm
Instructor: William Gray Roncal
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Earth & Planetary Science

B'More: Cleaner, Greener, and Sustainable Baltimore: An Inside Look

This course is for freshmen ONLY. This course is designed to provide students with a strong understanding of the principles of sustainability, how they are applied at Johns Hopkins and in the City of Baltimore, and identify their role within the sustainability sphere. Topics covered include exploration of the fundamentals of sustainability, theory and application; how sustainability principles are embedded in operations in the City and at Hopkins; appreciation for the varieties of viewpoints and perspectives; and developing long-term strategies

Course Number: AS.271.119.33
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/23/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 10am-4:30pm | Tu- 10am-4:30pm | W- 10am-4:30pm | Th- 10am-4:30pm | F- 10am-4:30pm
Instructor: Olivia Zug

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Economics

Seminar in Financial Literacy

The Seminar in Financial Literacy is a two-week seminar designed to introduce Hopkins undergraduates to the financial services industry. The goal is to provide an introduction to a variety of topics in finance, with a practical focus on exposing the students to employment options in the industry. The Seminar will consist of two weeks of lectures, delivered by distinguished Hopkins alumni, followed by a three-day trip to New York City during which we will visit various firms in the industry. By the end of the seminar, students should have developed an understanding of the structure and jargon of the financial services industry. Hence, they should be poised to profit from the firm visits and networking receptions that will take place on the trip to NYC.Application/Registration for Experiential Learning courses/trips must be processed at the Career Center, Garland Hall 3rd Floor. -REGISTER CAREER CENTER NOT ISIS-

Course Number: AS.180.104.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 -
Times:  M - 10am-12pm;2-4pm | Tu- 10am-12pm;2-4pm | W- 10am-12pm;2-4pm | Th- 10am-12pm;2-4pm | F- 10am-12pm;2-4pm
Instructor: Daniel Garcia

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Electrical and Computer Engineering

Optics Every Day

This course aims to explore how light is used in our everyday world. We will explore the basic physical properties of light and why it is integral in modern technology in a wide variety of applications from medicine and the internet to climate change. Background in physics is suggested but not required.

Course Number: EN.520.112.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: E
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 1:30-3:34pm | Th- 1:30-3:34pm
Instructors: Jasper Stroud and Milad Alemohammad
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Entrepreneurship & Management

Media & P.R. in the Big Apple

Gain insight into trends and career opportunities in public relations, advertising and media through one week of in-class learning (Jan. 9-13) followed by a three-day trip to New York (Jan. 17-19) to network with and learn from executives from firms like AMC Networks, Sesame Workshop and Ogilvy & Mather.Please note: Registration is manual--through Monica Butta at the Career Center

Course Number: EN.660.150.60
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/13/2017
Times:  M - 10am-3pm | Tu- 10am-3pm | W- 10am-3pm | Th- 10am-3pm | F- 10am-3pm
Instructor: Leslie Kendrick
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Sports Negotiation

Taught by a professional in the field, this course will provide an introduction to negotiation principles and explore various sports negotiations, including, but not limited to, player contracts, trades, and sponsorships. The course will be interactive and include several simulations.

Course Number: EN.660.157.22
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/17/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 3-5:15pm | W- 3-5:15pm | Th- 3-5:15pm
Instructor: Andres Lares
Syllabus: Download (.doc)
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Location, Location, Location

Taught by a professional in the field and a Hopkins graduate, this course explores the basic principles of real estate development and finance. A special feature for this year encourages student participation in social and financial analysis of a mixed-income residential project in South Africa.

Course Number: EN.660.160.11
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/13/2017
Times:  M - 3-6pm | Tu- 3-6pm | W- 3-6pm | Th- 3-6pm | F- 3-6pm
Instructor: Jeremy Gorelick
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Leading Social Change - Community Based Learning

Learn the principles, values, and skills necessary to lead and succeed in organizations that make a positive difference in today's world. The course is designed to help students identify and provide opportunities to enhance their leadership skills. A "Blueprint for Success" will provide the framework for students to cultivate their own ideas for new socially conscious entrepreneurial ventures. The "Blueprint for Success" will culminate with a social entrepreneurial business plan competition where up to $5000 grants may be awarded to plans for start up costs associated with new initiatives designed to enhance the JHU and Baltimore City communities. Students can enroll in the course with predetermined social change initiatives in mind or develop new initiatives in the classroom setting.

Course Number: EN.660.240.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 9:30am-1pm | W- 9:30am-1pm | Th- 9:30am-1pm
Instructor: Caroline Ouwerkerk

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Film & Media Studies

The Stand-Up Comic in Society

Stand-up comics uniquely reflect their own collision of cultures, ideas, and preferences. In this class, students study and analyze influential comics, then create, workshop, and ultimately perform their own four-minute stand-up routine. In addition to classroom hours, this course includes a field trip to an open mic comedy show in Washington, DC on Wednesday, January 18th (students should reserve the time period from around 6:00 PM to midnight for this purpose and will need to provide their own transportation). The class culminates in a required final performance in front of hundreds of students on the night of January 27 (7:00-10:00 PM). In addition to Tuesday and Friday evenings, the class will meet on Saturday mornings from 9:00 AM to noon.

Course Number: AS.061.146.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 7-10 PM | F- 7-10 PM
Instructor: Adam Ruben
Syllabus: Download (.doc)
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I Want To Be Humphrey Bogart

A close look at the Hollywood titan Humphrey Bogart in classics including Casablanca, To Have and Have Not, and The Big Sleep. In-class screenings and discussions are emphasized over lecture. No prior experience in film studies required.

Course Number: AS.061.257.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/17/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 3-6pm | W- 3-6pm | F- 3-6pm
Instructor: Lucy Bucknell

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Narrative Filmmaking: Pre-Prod Bootcamp

Narrative Filmmaking: Pre-Production Boot Camp. January 3-14, Mon-Fri 10 am-4 pm; Weekend and evening screenings and workshops. 3 credits. This two-week boot camp for student filmmakers from JHU and the Maryland Institute, College of Art (MICA), provides intensive training in the crucial aspects of preparing to shoot a successful narrative film. A weeklong workshop with a professional screenwriter will allow students to hone and improve their existing screenplays, practice the elements of writing for film, and learn how to do a script breakdown. A second workshop on working with actors, taught by a professional actor, will teach students the ins and outs of casting and directing. Supplemental workshops will cover elements of pre-production such as budgets, production schedules, call sheets, and legal issues.

Course Number: AS.061.319.12
Credits: 3
Distribution: H
Days:  
Times:  M - 10 am-4 pm | Tu- 10 am-4 pm | W- 10 am-4 pm | Th- 10 am-4 pm | F- 10 am-4 pm
Instructor: Kathleen Beller

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The Entertainment Industry in Contemporary Hollywood

Students will have the opportunity to spend one week in Los Angeles with Film and Media Studies Director Linda DeLibero. Students will meet and network with JHU alums in the entertainment industry, as well as heads of studios and talent agencies, screenwriters, directors, producers, and various other individuals in film and television. Associated fee with this intersession course is $1400 (financial support is available for those who qualify). Permission of Linda DeLibero is required. Film and Media Studies seniors and juniors will be given preference for the eight available slots, followed by senior minors.Students are expected to arrive in Los Angeles on January 8. The actual course runs January 9-13 with lodging check-in on January 8 and check-out on January 14.

Course Number: AS.061.377.60
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/13/2017
Times:  M - TBA | Tu- TBA | W- TBA | Th- TBA | F- TBA
Instructor: Linda DeLibero

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General Engineering

Manipulating Life: Biomolecular Engineering

Manipulating life has moved from the realm of science fantasy to pervading everyday life: from the consumption of genetically modified crops to the production of biofuels and pharmaceuticals. Biomolecular engineering applies the principles and methods of engineering to regulating dynamicmolecular processes in living systems. In this tutorial, students will be introduced to fundamental concepts in regulation of biological systems and the techniques used to manipulate these systems. We will survey various fields of biomolecular engineering with an emphasis on genetic/cellular engineering and historical, contemporary, and emerging uses of biological engineering. This seminar course will include assigned readings, lectures, active discussions, student presentations, and guest lectures.

Course Number: EN.500.120.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: E
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 6:00-8:30pm | W- 6:00-8:30pm
Instructor: Susan Liao
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Geography Environmental Engineering

Energy 101: Introduction to the Business and Policy of the US Energy Industry

This three-day intersession class will be a high-level overview of the US energy industry. We will focus on electricity, natural gas, oil, renewables and other forms of energy. We will discuss how each commodity is produced and traded from the perspective of the producer, the distributor, and the end user. The class will provide an overview of the technologies that convert energy into useful work, as well as the market, regulatory, and policy structures that influence investment in production, delivery, and consumption of electricity and natural gas. The goal is to provide a basis for further study, and to motivate students to consider a career in the industry. There are no prerequisites or textbooks, and the class is open to all. The course will be a mix of economics, basic engineering, financial mathematics, and sociology.Instructors are Carl Liggio and David Yaffe.

Course Number: EN.570.408.11
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  
Times:  M - 9am-12pm;1-5pm | Tu- 9am-12pm;1-5pm | W- 9am-12pm;1-5pm
Instructor: Carl Liggio

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Energy 102: Advanced Topics in Energy

This two-day intersession class will spend one day focusing in detail the oil industry and the other day on renewable energy development, finance and policy. All facets of the oil industry will be covered from exploration and production transportation and refining to economics and trading. The day will end with a discussion of alternative and synthetic fuels. The renewable energy day will focus on understanding the risks, structure and financing of renewable energy projects as well as how public policy influences those projects. There are no prerequisites or textbooks, and the class is open to all. It is highly recommended to take Energy 101. Instructors are alumni from the industry: Bob Riley, Frank Shaw, and Paul Schockett.

Course Number: EN.570.409.11
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  
Times:  Th- 9-12pm; 1-5pm | F- 9-12pm; 1-5pm
Instructors: Carl Liggio and Frank Shaw

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Energy 103: Financing a Sustainable World

This two-day intersession class will examine the role of financial markets as the world looks to shift to a more environmentally sustainable global system and fund the trillions of dollars of necessary to enable this shift. The class will begin with a brief overview of the capital markets, the current energy mix in the United States, and how new energy projects are evaluated and funded. Students will be asked to review, analyze and discuss investment opportunities focusing on key risks, economic return, and environmental impact. The goal of the course is to understand how the global financial market, one of man's most powerful tools, is currently financing change and how it can be more efficiently leveraged to address global environmental issues. There are no prerequisites or textbooks, and the class is open to all. Instructors are industry professionals focusing on sustainable project finance and impact investing. Instructors: Jeff Eckel, Guy Van Syckle.

Course Number: EN.570.410.21
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/17/2017 - Friday 1/20/2017
Times:  Tu- 9am-12pm;1-5pm | W- 9am-12pm;1-5pm | Th- 9am-12pm;1-5pm
Instructors: Carl Liggio and Gabriel Thoumi

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Energy 104: Electricity Markets, Trading and Risk Manag

Energy 104: Electricity Markets, Trading and Risk Management This two-day intersession class introduces you to complex electricity markets and allows you to experience trading in them through live in-class simulations. The course alternates between lectures and electricity market games that illustrate the underlying drivers of the evolution of power markets. This allows for a more intuitive understanding of how markets have evolved into their current structure. Lectures will deep dive into the current nodal structure and key players in these markets - load serving entities, generators, utilities, and the Independent System Operator (ISO). Significant in-class participation in groups is required. A senior guest speaker will provide his perspective on these markets followed by Q&A. A laptop with working WiFi connection is required. Instructor is Lori Simpson.

Course Number: EN.570.413.31
Credits: 1
Distribution: E S
Days:  Monday 1/23/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 9am-12pm; 1-5pm | Tu- 9am-12pm; 1-5pm
Instructor: Lori Simpson

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Energy 105: Clean Energy Economics and Policy

Whether financing clean energy projects or setting policy, it is important to understand how different electricity sources can be compared. This intersession course economically compares renewable and energy efficiency investment options. Simple techniques for matching load with generation and clean technologies will be developed. Detailed life-cycle cost analysis will be prepared including uncertainty. Energy efficiency cost-effectiveness will be determined using basic cost tests and varying policy issues will be discussed. Avoided costs and operational impacts of renewable energy will be computed using different state requirements. The goal is to provide the basic computational and policy framework for determining the economics of a wide range of energy options and understand the limitation of various techniques. Students should bring a calculator or laptop computer.

Course Number: EN.570.414.31
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  
Times:  Th- 9am-5pm | F- 9am-5pm
Instructor: Cynthia Bothwell
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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German and Romance Languages and Literatures

Carpe Diem: Seizing Life Through Literature and Music

This course will address how literature and music help us to seize the day, live in the present, and experience life to the fullest instead of idealizing it. Readings and listenings include diverse genres: Classics (Horace, Catullus), Italian Renaissance (Lorenzo dei Medici, Torquato Tasso), American poetry (Walt Whitman, Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg), the Bible (Ecclesiastes), jazz (Bill Evans), songwriters (Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen), classical music (Daniel Barenboim).

Course Number: AS.211.219.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 10:30am-12pm | Th- 10:30am-12pm | F- 10:30am-12pm
Instructor: Francesco Brenna
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Framing Mafia: Cosa Nostra, Movies and Popular Culture

This course explores how Sicilian Mafia deeply influenced the social, cultural and historical landscape of Sicily and Italy, from its origin in the 19th century to the present. The aim is to provide insights into society and culture fascination with Mafia, but also deconstruct the myths and stereotypes that surround it. From the Godfather to the most recent crime fictions, this course examines how Mafia is depicted, idealized and parodied in Italian movies and literature.

Course Number: AS.211.242.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 1-2:45pm | W- 1-2:45pm | F- 1-2:45pm
Instructor: Beatrice Variolo
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Not Understanding: Theory

This course tackles the thinking of the most currently renowned and notoriously difficult interdisciplinary thinkers of the 20th century. Students will have the opportunity to read and engage with puzzling and inciting theoretical work by primary sources, such as Walter Benjamin, Hannah Arendt and Judith Butler, without worrying about the grade (pass/fail) or lack of understanding because we will experiment with a different approach to reading and thinking collectively beyond oppositions.

Course Number: AS.211.303.22
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/17/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 1-3:30pm | W- 1-3:30pm | Th- 1-3:30pm
Instructor: Maya Nitis
Syllabus: Download (.doc)
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No Man's Land: Organized Crime Across the US-Mex border

This course intends to present - through literary, TV, and film samples - the Mexican criminal organizations operating across the US-Mexican border since the 1960s to current days. The students will analyze the materials considering different fields (i.e. social sciences, economics) and focusing on the following aspects: use of violence, relationship of these organizations with the territory, dynamics between criminals, citizens, and institutions.

Course Number: AS.211.309.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 10-11:45am | W- 10-11:45am | F- 10-11:45am
Instructor: Matteo Cantarello
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Against! New Italian Political Cinema

This course explores the controversial relationship between aesthetics and political commitment in contemporary Italian cinema. After watching Italian classics by Roberto Rossellini, Vittorio De Sica and Francesco Rosi, the course will investigate the Italian filmic production of the last twenty years, paying particular attention to the political gaze in the cinema of Matteo Garrone, Nanni Moretti and the 2014 Oscar winner Paolo Sorrentino.

Course Number: AS.211.334.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 11am-12:30pm | Th- 11am-12:30pm | F- 11am-12:30pm
Instructor: Alberto Luca Zuliani
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Fundamentals of Critical Theory

This course provides students with a foundation for as well as a brief introduction to Critical Theory. While paying close attention to the texts and the form in which they present themselves, we will explore major concepts such as dialectics, metaphysics, and freedom. Students will gain familiarity with historical works that have proven immensely influential in modern Europe and beyond, but will also be expected to consider ways in which such thinking has relevance for today's world.

Course Number: AS.213.319.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/17/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 3:30-5:15pm | W- 3:30-5:15pm | Th- 3:30-5:15pm | F- 3:30-5:15pm
Instructor: Jason Yonover

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Favorite Ministers on Stage

During the late-sixteenth and early-seventeenth centuries, the kingdoms of England and Spain were dominated by favorites, this is all-powerful ministers who enjoyed royal favor. The rise of favorites coincides with the transformation of theater into an outstanding channel for cultural expression. In this course students will discuss plays featuring favorites by Christopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson and Lope de Vega. The objective of this course is to analyze early modern drama in light of contemporary life at court

Course Number: AS.215.314.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 9:30-11:15am | W- 9:30-11:15am | F- 9:30-11:15am
Instructor: Francisco Gomez Martos
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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History

The World of Alexander Hamilton

Lin-Manuel Miranda's Tony Award-winning musical and Ron Chernow's acclaimed biography have thrust Alexander Hamilton into the limelight. This course will investigate the life of one of America's most enigmatic founding fathers and the turbulent Atlantic world he inhabited. In the process, we will consider the role of biography in writing the history of Revolutionary America and consider Hamilton's legacy in the popular imagination.

Course Number: AS.100.277.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/20/2017
Times:  M - 10am-12pm | Tu- 10am-12pm | W- 10am-12pm | Th- 10am-12pm
Instructor: Christopher Consolino

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"Gayborhood" Histories

Many cities have designated "gayborhoods" as cultural districts. This course will use a variety of histories and case studies to explore how gender and sexuality have come to be seen as marketable and spatialized. Class tours will explore sites related to Baltimore lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer history. Through neighborhood voices we will explore the stories elided by "gayborhood" construction, with particular attention to the intersections of race, class, and gender.

Course Number: AS.100.284.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 2-5pm | W- 2-5pm | F- 2-5pm
Instructor: Mo Speller
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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B'More: Business and the Black Community in Baltimore

This course is for freshmen ONLY.The image of a CVS pharmacy burning following protests is perhaps one of the most visual and memorable moments of the Baltimore uprising in April 2015. This course will examine the CVS burning as a starting point for exploring the relationship between business' broadly construed and Baltimore's black community. In doing so, it addresses critical questions about urban development, black entrepreneurship, and corporate social responsibility in the post-war era. This course will include field trips.

Course Number: AS.100.285.33
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/23/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 10am-4:30pm | Tu- 10am-4:30pm | W- 10am-4:30pm | Th- 10am-4:30pm | F- 10am-4:30pm
Instructor: Jessica Levy

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History of Science & Technology

B'More: Johns Hopkins' Baltimore

This course is for freshmen ONLY. You know he spelled his name with an S, but what else do you know about our university's namesake, Johns Hopkins? In this B'More course, you'll explore the life and legacy of Quaker, businessman, and philanthropist Johns Hopkins. Field trips will take us to local historic sites and cultural institutions around the city, and our service project will take place at Hopkins' former home, Clifton.

Course Number: AS.140.318.33
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/23/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 10am-4:30pm | Tu- 10am-4:30pm | W- 10am-4:30pm | Th- 10am-4:30pm | F- 10am-4:30pm
Instructors: Jennifer Kinniff and James Stimpert
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Humanities Center

B'More: Homelessness

Please note, class will meet Saturday, Jan. 28 in the event of inclement weather. This course is for freshmen ONLY. In Baltimore, as in any major city, many urban poor find themselves without a home and without shelter. For these individuals, life on the streets is desperate and dangerous. Students will read, discuss, and debate about the causes and implications of homelessness in Baltimore, and explore present policies and potential solutions. Guest speakers include homeless rights advocates from both local government and community groups. Students will also participate in service directly affecting homeless persons.

Course Number: AS.300.100.33
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/23/2017 -
Times:  M - 10am-4:30pm | Tu- 10am-4:30pm | W- 10am-4:30pm | Th- 10am-4:30pm | F- 10am-4:30pm
Instructor: Thomas Gottbreht

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The Aims of Education

"When am I ever going to use this in real life?" This course will encourage students to reflect on their own learning experiences at Hopkins (and beyond) while engaging with central ideas from the philosophy, history, and sociology of education. Students should leave the course with a greater sense of understanding and purpose around their own educational journeys. Readings from Plato, Rousseau, Dewey, Freire and Cavell, as well as selections from literature and film.

Course Number: AS.300.221.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 2-3:45pm | W- 2-3:45pm | F- 2-3:45pm
Instructor: Michael McCreary
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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The Existence of God in Modern Philosophy

Much of modern philosophy is defined in relation to a proof--or the rejection of the possibility of a proof--of the existence of God. This course takes up this central philosophical problem in the works of four philosophers: Descartes, Spinoza, Kant, and Hegel. Paying particular attention to philosophical methodology, we will examine the stakes of proving God's existence and the ways in which the very idea of God changes for these philosophers.

Course Number: AS.300.306.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: H N
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 1-4:30pm | W- 1-4:30pm | F- 1-4:30pm
Instructors: Omid Mehrgan and Alexander Host

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Interdepartmental

Library Research and Research/Grant Proposal Writing

This course offers training to undergraduate and graduate students on the fundamentals of library research and research/grant proposal writing. The course will introduce the students to the major research resources (esp. social sciences), strategies and techniques to conduct effective research, and how to use library research to enhance research and grant proposal writing. This course aims to help students learn the basics of research and grant proposal writing and develop useful research skills that will benefit them in the long run.

Course Number: AS.360.107.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 1-2:45pm | W- 1-2:45pm | Th- 1-2:45pm
Instructor: Yunshan Ye

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B'More: Baltimore City Urban Planning

This course is for freshman ONLY. Why does Baltimore have so many vacant and underutilized properties? Is gentrification a good or bad thing? How can the City become more sustainable? These are few of the many issues and challenges that City Planners address. This class will give an overview of urban planning using Baltimore as a laboratory. It will involve walking trips to two or more different neighborhoods as well as readings and guest speakers to explore both challenges and solutions. Students will work individually or small groups to propose policy solutions to real urban challenges.

Course Number: AS.360.108.33
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/23/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 10am-4:30pm | Tu- 10am-4:30pm | W- 10am-4:30pm | Th- 10am-4:30pm | F- 10am-4:30pm
Instructors: Laurie Feinberg and Mark Cameron
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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B'More: Integrative Medicine

This course is for freshmen ONLY. World wide, the burden of our health costs are due to preventable chronic diseases such as diabetes, obesity, cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurological and substance abuse issues. Because lifestyle, diet, lack of exercise and stress are major contributing factors, Traditional Medicine (TM) or Complimentary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) approaches are becoming increasingly important globally. Distinguishing between Traditional and Modern medicines, we will consider the rising use of Integrative Medicine as the upcoming model for the Healing Arts. Students will be introduced to some of the most popular types of TM or CAM, including biologically based practices. Strategies for optimal health during your academic years will be offered and demonstrated. An interactive and eye-opening class!

Course Number: AS.360.122.33
Distribution: H N
Days:  Monday 1/23/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 10am-4:30pm | Tu- 10am-4:30pm | W- 10am-4:30pm | Th- 10am-4:30pm | F- 10am-4:30pm
Instructor: Georganne Giordano
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Applying Yourself: External Fellowships

In this writing-based course students will learn to craft competitive applications for the prestigious external fellowships overseen by the National Fellowships Program (fellowships.jhu.edu/list-of-fellowships). While learning skills to produce this specific type of writing including concision, cohesion, narrative arc, peer editing, and revising by the end of the class, students will compose a completed fellowship application and be mock interviewed by classmates and outside guests. Applying Yourself will also feature class visits from previous JHU fellowship winners. Open to all undergraduate students in all fields.

Course Number: AS.360.124.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 1-2:45pm | W- 1-2:45pm | F- 1-2:45pm
Instructor: Jeannette E. Miller
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Introducing the George Peabody Library

Love social media and rare books? Why not combine the two? In this course students will learn about the history of the George Peabody Library, explore its incredible collection of rare books, and creatively share the library's mysteries through social media. From a whirlwind survey of book history to examining how modern technology is giving rare materials new audiences, students will see that there is life in that old book yet.

Course Number: AS.360.128.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 1:15-3:30PM | Th- 1:15-3:30PM
Instructor: Heidi Herr
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Breaking in Baltimore: Urban Education

Breaking in Baltimore is a week-long immersion experience(1/21 - 1/27) where students explore social justice issues by engaging greater Baltimore through direct service and educational sessions. The Urban Education program explores Baltimore's education infrastructure and the challenges of educating young Baltimoreans. Students will participate in classroom sessions as well as service learning projects in greater Baltimore with local agencies. Student participation begins the morning of Saturday, January 21 and runs through the afternoon on Friday, January 27. Students must participate full-time, including living in the off-campus retreat center and participating in some evening programming. Students must apply through Center For Social Concern. Application available early October on the CSC website: http://studentaffairs.jhu.edu/socialconcern/programs/alternative-breaks/ . Fee: Approx. $125. Financial aid is available.

Course Number: AS.360.130.31
Credits: 2
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/23/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 9am-5pm | Tu- 9am-5pm | W- 9am-5pm | Th- 9am-5pm | F- 9am-5pm
Instructor: Lance McCoy

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Lessons in Historical Entrepreneurship

This course will explore the careers of four great historical entrepreneurs from different time periods and regions of the world: one North American, one European, one African, and one Asian; one ancient, one Renaissance-Enlightenment, one early-modern, and one current, with an eye towards exploring how their careers, primary writings, and secondary writings about them can teach us core lessons about what it takes to be a great entrepreneur. In addition to lecture and class discussion, each class will feature 1-2 prominent guest speakers for a 30 minute Q&A with students.

Course Number: AS.360.138.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  
Times:  Tu- 1-3:15pm | W- 1-3:15pm
Instructor: Paul Grossinger

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Sacred Spaces

This course will explore sacred spaces and practices in eight religious traditions: Hinduism, Judaism, Catholic Christianity, Protestant Christianity, Orthodox Christianity, Sikhism, Islam, and Buddhism. Over the course of one week, students will learn to identify and appreciate elements of sacred architecture, learn more about the relationship between religious diversity and religious pluralism in the United States, and to explore the relationship between religious practice and sacred space in many of the world's traditions. This course aims to deepen students' understanding of many religious traditions as well as the role religion plays in society more generally. Class on Monday and Friday will meet at the Interfaith Center and all other days will be spent on day-long field trips.

Course Number: AS.360.225.11
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/13/2017
Times:  M - 9am-1pm | Tu- 8:15am-6pm | W- 8:15am-6pm | Th- 8:15am-6pm | F- 9am-1pm
Instructor: Kathy Schnurr

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Breaking in Baltimore: Refugee Communities

Breaking in Baltimore is a week-long immersion experience where students explore social justice issues by engaging greater Baltimore through direct service and educational sessions. The Refugee Community program explores the challenges of refugee immigrants and the communities that support them. Student participation begins on Saturday, January 21 and runs through Friday, January 27. Students must participate full-time, including living in the off-campus retreat center and participating in some evening programming. Students will participate in classroom sessions as well as service learning projects in greater Baltimore with local agencies. There is also a DC policy field trip to engage these issues from a national perspective. Students must apply through the Center For Social Concern--application due early November. Fee: Approx. $125. Financial aid is available.

Course Number: AS.360.276.31
Credits: 2
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/23/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 8am-5pm | Tu- 8am-5pm | W- 8am-5pm | Th- 8am-5pm | F- 8am-5pm
Instructor: Robert Francis

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International Studies

Culture and the Professions

In what situations may culture arise in the work of the professional, whether in health care, international diplomacy, law, airline safety, or others? What exactly is culture, and what are the cultural differences that may shape relationships in the professions? This course introduces students to the meaning and role of culture, and culture’s possible impact on professional settings, principally in the international arena but also in domestic situations. Students will become familiar with the relevant bibliography (including the leading cultural databases) and participate in practical simulations.One (1) credit. Pass/fail grading based on mandatory attendance and writing assignment. Open to [juniors and seniors/all class years]. Limited enrollment.

Course Number: AS.192.300.11
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/13/2017
Times:  W- 10am-4pm | Th- 10am-4pm | F- 10am-12pm
Instructor: Ilhung Lee
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Mathematics

Recreational Mathematics

We will explore the mathematics behind various recreational mathematics problems including the combinatorics of polyominoes, the number theory behind digit problems, the group theory behind twisty puzzles (like Rubik's cube) and various problems by Martin Gardner.

Course Number: AS.110.163.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 1-2:45pm | Th- 1-2:45pm | F- 1-2:45pm
Instructor: Daniel Fuentes-Keuthan

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Hitchhiker's Guide to Algebraic Topology

Topology is the study of shapes, it is the bridge that connects set theory to differential geometry. In this course we'll explore the true origins of several ubiquitous notions in mathematics like continuity, compactness, metric spaces. We'll learn gluing and pasting methods in topology and create fun, exotic, abstruse spaces. We'll make friends with Mobius strips and Klein bottles and define quantitative invariants like Homology and Euler characteristic to study them.Students should have done a proof based course and be comfortable with sets.

Course Number: AS.110.360.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: Q
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 10am-12:15pm | W- 10am-12:15pm | Th- 10am-12:15pm | F- 10am-12:15pm
Instructor: Apurva Nakade
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Mechanical Engineering

Introduction to Computer-Aided Design (Online)

This online course covers the use of computer-aided design (CAD) and finite element analysis (FEA) in performing mechanical design and engineering, using PTC's Creo Parametric. By the end of this course, you will be able to model parts and assemblies in 3D, interpret and create engineering drawings, and perform structural analyses. Additionally, following the completion of the requisite material, additional content will be made available to students. Students should note: you can either install Creo on your personal computer or use one of the University's computer labs. Creo is Window's based. Please know that getting Creo running on a Mac is possible, but troublesome.

Course Number: EN.530.114.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: E
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - ONLINE | Tu- ONLINE | W- ONLINE | Th- ONLINE | F- ONLINE
Instructor: Michael Boyle
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Introduction to Computer-Aided Design (Online)

This online course covers the use of computer-aided design (CAD) and finite element analysis (FEA) in performing mechanical design and engineering, using PTC's Creo Parametric. By the end of this course, you will be able to model parts and assemblies in 3D, interpret and create engineering drawings, and perform structural analyses. Additionally, following the completion of the requisite material, additional content will be made available to students. Students should note: you can either install Creo on your personal computer or use one of the University's computer labs. Creo is Window's based. Please know that getting Creo running on a Mac is possible, but troublesome.

Course Number: EN.530.114.14
Credits: 1
Distribution: E
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  
Instructor: Michael Boyle
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Engineering Design Outreach

This course gives JHU students an opportunity to interact with and explain the engineering design process to middle-school students at a local school. The JHU students will learn to lead an in-class engineering design challenge and share with the youth the rigorous process that is engineering design. This is an opportunity to inspire young students from disadvantaged backgrounds, show them the excitement of being an engineer and gain professional development in teaching and communication.

Course Number: EN.530.260.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: E
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 10:30AM-12:30PM | W- 10:30AM-12:30PM | Th- 10:30AM-12:30PM
Instructor: Margaret Hart
Syllabus: Download (.doc)
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Wind Energy: Aerodynamics and Control

Wind energy is a growing field in the US with a national goal of 20 percent Wind Energy by 2030. After touching on recent market trends, this course teaches the fundamentals of wind energy aerodynamics and control. Blade element momentum theory and other methods used in the analysis and design of wind turbines will be discussed. Wind farm applications will be discussed with emphasis on wake models and control. The course is meant to be an introduction in the field, such that students can later participate in research in wind energy.

Course Number: EN.530.307.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: E
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 1-2:45pm | Tu- 1-2:45pm | Th- 1-2:45pm
Instructors: Carl Shapiro and Luis Martinez-Tossas
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Introduction to Scientific Computing

The most important tool in science and engineering, computers find applications in all aspects of academia and industry alike. Though expected to employ this tool effectively, few scientists or engineers have been trained to harness the power at their fingertips, and most could benefit significantly from a high-level exposure to scientific computing methodology. This course will introduce many computational tools, tricks, and tips that would otherwise require years of trial and error to learn.

Course Number: EN.530.391.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: E
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 1-4pm | W- 1-4pm | F- 1-4pm
Instructor: Adam Sierakowski
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Museums and Society

B'More: Explore Baltimore Museums

This course is for freshmen ONLY. Field-trip based class goes behind the scenes of local museums (history, art, science, aquarium). We meet with curators, exhibit designers, educators and conservators and learn about the museums' histories, philosophies and activities to become more informed visitors.

Course Number: AS.389.171.33
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/23/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 10am-4:30pm | Tu- 10am-4:30pm | W- 10am-4:30pm | Th- 10am-4:30pm | F- 10am-4:30pm
Instructor: Jennifer Kingsley
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Music

Dylan, Motown and the Beatles

Marked by social and political unrest, the 1960s was one of the most dramatic decades in American history. Popular music became a significant vehicle for social and political commentary, and played an important role in shaping the legacy of this controversial decade. In this course we will explore 1960s popular music through structured listening, critical readings and guided discussion, with the aim of gaining a better understanding of 1960s popular music and its connections to the complexities of this pivotal decade.

Course Number: AS.376.142.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/20/2017
Times:  M - 9:30am-12pm | Tu- 9:30am-12pm | Th- 9:30am-12pm
Instructor: Michael Rickelton
Syllabus: Download (.doc)
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Expanding Time, Space + Meaning in Visual Art and Music

This course tracks evolving concepts and perceptions of time and space throughout the 20th century and the implications of such concepts on notions of meaning and beauty in both visual and musical contexts. Specifically, this course will consider the performances and recordings of pianist Ivo Pogorelich and the abstract expressionist paintings of Gerhard Richter as contemporary traces of a more sweeping historical gesture embodied in the work Paul Cézanne, beginning near the turn of the 20th century.

Course Number: AS.376.178.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 1-2:45PM | W- 1-2:45pm | F- 1-2:45pm
Instructor: Jonathan Zwi
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Near Eastern Studies

Ancient Egyptian Artifacts in Baltimore

This class will examine ancient Egyptian art and artifacts housed in the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum and the Walters Art Museum from the perspectives of the late 19th and early 20th century travelers, antiquarians, and scholars who collected them. Through hands-on study of artifacts and archival resources, we will attempt to trace the objects' paths from the land of the pharaohs to Baltimore, uncovering their ancient cultural significances along the way.

Course Number: AS.130.204.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 10-11:45am | Tu- 10-11:45am | Th- 10-11:45am
Instructor: Ashley Arico
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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The Archaeology of Beer

Having its origins in human prehistory, beer constitutes one of humanity's oldest inventions. Since that time, it grew to be a nearly ubiquitous feature of human civilization throughout the world. This course will explore the roles played by beer in ancient human societies through a consideration of brewing science, anthropological and social theory, and archaeological methods aimed at identifying the remains of ancient beer, its brewing and consumption.

Course Number: AS.130.211.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 10-11:45am | Th- 10-11:45am | F- 10-11:45am
Instructor: Christopher Brinker
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Neuroscience

Multisensory Integration: Functions and dysfunctions

Sensory systems provide information about our world and dictate our behavior. Integration of multiple sensory inputs allow for a more accurate and coherent representation of our surroundings. In this course we will present scientific evidence for naturalistic forms of multisensory integration in the mammalian brain. We will focus on the neural systems and circuits that facilitate these processes as well as their involvement in illusions and disorders. Our teaching approach will include didactic lectures followed by either class discussion of current literature in the field or active demonstrations of sensory integration. Students will be graded (P/F) based on assigned readings, in-class participation and a final group presentation.

Course Number: AS.080.110.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 2-3:45pm | W- 2-3:45pm | F- 2-3:45pm
Instructors: Gabriela Rodriguez and Varun Chokshi
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Protein Biology in Neurologic Disease

This course will cover basic protein biology and how proteins contribute to brain function, with a strong emphasis on disease pathology. Topics will include basics of protein interaction and localization, functional consequences of specific genetic aberrations, as well as how these aberrations contribute to observable disease phenotypes. Instructors will give weekly lectures, supplemented with primary literature pertaining to course topics.

Course Number: AS.080.204.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 1-2:45pm | Th- 1-2:45pm | F- 1-2:45pm
Instructors: Mark Zbinden and Gabby Sell
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Philosophy

Personal Identity and the Self

At the core of this course will be the question: what features make a person the same individual over time? Does personal identity consist in the continuity of memories and psychological traits, or is it something else? We will take both a historical and a contemporary look at some proposed answers, and discuss what we should do in cases where identity might become uncertain, such as brain transplants, teleportation, and duplication.

Course Number: AS.150.104.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 1-2:45pm | W- 1-2:45pm | F- 1-2:45pm
Instructor: Kathryn Brophy
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Relativism

In philosophy and the social sciences, it has been argued that a variety of truths, such as truths about what is right, what is known, what is rational etc., which were once considered absolute, are actually only true relative to some kind of perspective, culture, or theoretical orientation. In this course we will address the general question of what it means for a certain class of truths to be relative, by scrutinizing various specific relativist proposals.

Course Number: AS.150.117.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/20/2017
Times:  Tu- 10-11:45am | W- 10-11:45am | Th- 10-11:45am | F- 10-11:45am
Instructor: Matthew O'Dowd

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What is Happiness?

The question of human happiness dates back to Ancient times. What is the best life a human can lead? Is it a life of pleasure, or does it include other features? Does a good life vary among people and cultures, or is it universal? Do we select the things that make our life go well, so that it allows for self-creation and personal expression of one's values? Possible readings include selections from Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Nozick, Nussbaum, and Scanlon, among others.

Course Number: AS.150.200.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 10-11:45am | W- 10-11:45am | F- 10-11:45am
Instructor: Kevin Powell

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The Good, the Bad, & the Guilty

What is guilt exactly? Can it be ascribed to a group? Further, are there distinct varieties of guilt? We will examine these questions and explore the concept of guilt via Karl Jaspers' short work, "The Question of German Guilt", excerpts from Nietzsche, and film analysis.

Course Number: AS.150.239.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 2-3:45pm | W- 2-3:45pm | F- 2-3:45pm
Instructor: Alexander Englert
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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The Folk Psychology Debate

What does it mean to have beliefs, hopes, thoughts, and desires? These propositional attitudes pervade our ordinary "folk" understanding of human psychology. In what sense do they exist? Should they be used in scientific theorizing? Would the failure of folk psychology to explain human behavior be “the greatest intellectual catastrophe in the history of our species", as Jerry Fodor claims? This course will survey the debate about the reality and legitimacy of propositional attitudes.

Course Number: AS.150.242.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 10-11:45am | Th- 10-11:45am | F- 10-11:45am
Instructor: Palmer Gunderson
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Introduction to Philosophy of Food

What is real food? Is our eating gendered? Is cooking an expression of autonomy? How ought we regard animals, farmers, and the environment? These are important questions with consequences that regularly influence our food choices. This course begins a philosophical inquiry into food via three questions: What is food, where does food come from, and who eats food? These questions allow us to weave a unified narrative, which addresses otherwise disparate questions about food.

Course Number: AS.150.244.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 10-11:45am | Th- 10-11:45am | F- 10-11:45am
Instructor: David Williams
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Mental Time Travel

Recent work in psychology and neuroscience has given birth to a fascinating hypothesis, suggesting that episodic remembering and imagining are operations of a single mental faculty, the faculty for "mental time travel". This course will explore the philosophical consequences of this idea. What are memory and imagination (for)? Are there differences between them? Or is memory simply the imagination of the past?

Course Number: AS.150.251.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H N
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 1-2:45pm | W- 1-2:45pm | Th- 1-2:45pm
Instructor: Nikola Andonovski

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Business Ethics

What is a responsible business practice? Do corporations have responsibility as "moral agents" What is the relation between business and environment ? In this course we will investigate the relation of business practices and ethical thinking by analyzing and assessing philosophical arguments about the moral status of business. We will start by reading philosophical texts that offer an analysis of moral practices, decision-making procedures, and moral theories. In particular, we will read historical text by Aristotle, Hume, Adam Smith, Mill, Marx, , and Keynes. Then we will see how these philosophical concepts and theories can be applied to the contemporary world of business. The main goal of this course is to critically evaluate the philosophical foundations and justifications for business and economic systems, and how this applies to specific issues as workplace discrimination, ethics of advertising, environmental destruction and consumer protection.

Course Number: AS.150.255.13
Credits: 2
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 3-6pm | Th- 3-6pm | F- 3-6pm
Instructor: Marianna Bergamaschi Ganapini

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An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mathematics

An basic introduction to the central issues in the philosophy of mathematics. Topics include: A brief history of the philosophy of mathematics (Plato and Aristotle, Locke, Descartes, Kant, and the historical crisis in the foundations of the calculus); Logicism in Frege and Russell; Formalism; Intuitionism and Realism; Platonism and Nominalism.

Course Number: AS.150.327.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 9am-12pm | W- 9am-12pm | F- 9am-12pm
Instructor: Richard Teague

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Physics & Astronomy

We offer a number of intersession courses in introductory astronomy this year. They may be of special interest to students considering taking 171.118, Stars and the Universe, this year because that course, usually offered in the spring semester, will not be offered in Spring 2014.

Exploring the Building Blocks of the Universe

Ever wonder what everything is made of at the smallest level? What is dark matter? What is causing the universe to accelerate? These are some of the questions that physicists at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN are trying to answer. In this course, you’ll get hands on experience looking at real LHC data while learning about the current theory of particle physics and the inner workings of the LHC.

Course Number: AS.171.111.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 10:30-12pm | Th- 10:30-12pm | F- 10:30-12pm
Instructor: Alice Cocoros

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What Happens Next?: The Magic of Physics

No prior physics knowledge is required. Each class will introduce a Physics topic by using a demo experiment. Students will design and build an experiment in groups. A worksheet with experiment theory and main idea will be available online to help students prepare for their experiments. Each lab will be motivated by an open ended question such as: How can we know and optimize the distance of a projectile? Most materials required are items available in any household. The class will end with a student-led discussion of the physical phenomena observed and the concepts and theory behind them will be further explained by the instructor. Students will work on a group presentation, to be presented to the rest of the class. Presentations can be traditional slides or other interactive media such as videos, interviews, etc. The final examination will be a group final project on a topic previously agreed upon with the instructor.

Course Number: AS.171.129.13
Credits: 2
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 9am-12pm | W- 9am-12pm | F- 9am-12pm
Instructor: Maria Pia Valdivia Leiva
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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The Radio Sky

Modern astronomy relies on observations of the sky across the full electromagnetic spectrum. This course will explore the sky at radio wavelengths much longer than those we see with our naked eye. Topics will include pulsars, super-massive black holes and active galactic nuclei, the birth of the universe, and dark matter. As an integral part of the course, students will use the JHU Small Radio Telescope in the Bloomberg Center to make observations of our galaxy. This course is open to all, but a familiarity with algebra and geometry is assumed.

Course Number: AS.171.130.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: N
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 3:30-5pm | W- 3:30-5pm | F- 3:30-5pm
Instructor: Thomas Essinger-Hileman
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Math Methods of Introductory Physics

Introductory physics courses rely heavily on a handful of mathematical concepts to express abstract ideas and calculate results based on theories. A strong working knowledge of this math provides deeper insight to concepts in physics as well as greater familiarity with calculation. This course will provide an overview of basic ideas in vector calculus (including multi-dimensional calculus), differential equations, and complex numbers as applied to intro-level mechanics and electromagnetism.

Course Number: AS.171.222.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  W- 1-3:15pm | F- 1-3:15pm
Instructor: Nick Eminizer
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Simulating Nature: An Intro to Large Scale Computing

A single raindrop contains ~10^22 atoms but few problems with three or more particles can be solved by hand. High performance computing gives researchers the ability to simulate billions of atoms and numerically solve otherwise intractable problems. This course gives students an interactive introduction to using supercomputers to simulate matter at the atomic scale and analyze the resulting behavior with Python. Students will learn the basic skills of a computational scientist and use them to explore applications in engineering, biology, and physics. No prior knowledge of programming necessary.

Course Number: AS.171.325.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: N E
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 10-11:45am | Tu- 10-11:45am | Th- 10-11:45am
Instructors: Thomas O'Connor and Joel Clemmer
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Raman scattering spectroscopy for characterization of m

The course is aimed on undergraduate students in Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and Material Science and Engineering. The course will give an introduction to Raman scattering vibrational spectroscopy, instrumentation, and vibrational spectroscopy analysis for characterization of materials. For practical work participants will be divided in small groups to perform Raman scattering measurements on various samples, will learn to do basic analysis of the data, and will discuss their results in the final mini-presentation.

Course Number: AS.171.358.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: N Q
Days:  Monday 1/17/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 10-11:45am | W- 10-11:45am | F- 10-11:45am
Instructor: Natalia Drichko

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Political Science

Feminism and International Relations

This course examines the role of feminist thought in international relations, and asks how a feminist viewpoint challenges core concepts of international relations research. We will read prominent works in (queer) feminist theory and methodology alongside studies of the position of women in diplomatic contexts, the notion of femininity underlying global treaties, and the promotion of gender equality in international institutions. The thematic focus of the course lies on global security issues and international organizations.

Course Number: AS.191.120.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/17/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 10am-12:30pm | W- 10am-12:30pm | F- 10am-12:30pm
Instructor: Franziska Strack
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Gentrify This! B'More & Urban Policy

This course examines gentrification as policy and as social concern. Students will study its local and national history; explore the role of race, class, and gender in urban revitalization policies; and present a theoretical framework for understanding these policy decisions. Content includes: discussion of contemporary gentrification efforts through analysis of urban politics theory & history; written memos exploring how researchers study the city; & policy walking tours of Waverly, Roland Park & Remington.

Course Number: AS.191.249.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 1-2:45pm | Th- 1-2:45pm | F- 1-2:45pm
Instructor: Sarah Lawton
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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IR and the American Civil War

Together, we will explore the origins, contours, and grand strategies of the American Civil War through the lens of international relations. Despite its exceptional origins, the American Union falls into a catastrophic civil war, which ends with the conquest of one regional section by another and fundamentally changes the constitution. Topics include: the expansionary causes of disunion, the character of military forces, the foreign policies of north and south, and international perceptions of the conflict.

Course Number: AS.191.281.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/20/2017
Times:  Tu- 6:30-8:45pm | W- 6:30-8:45pm | Th- 6:30-8:45pm
Instructor: Ryan Fried
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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History of American Environmentalism

This course explores the emergence and evolution of environmentalism in American political thought, in three main periods. First, early American conservationism focused on the edifying power of nature (Muir, Thoreau, Whitman, Marsh). Second, environmentalists in the 1960s-70s rejected the excesses of industrialization and capitalism, and embraced the idea of a unified planet (Carson, Ehrlich, Commoner, Lovelock). Third, contemporary eco-modernists favor embracing technology to restructure society for efficiency and ecological harmony (Brand, Lomborg, Beck, Bookchin).

Course Number: AS.191.350.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/20/2017
Times:  M - 2:30-5pm | Tu- 2:30-5pm | Th- 2:30-5pm
Instructor: Elizabeth Mendenhall
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Political Theory and Human Survival

In this class, students will read contemporary political thought about the future. We'll pay special attention to the six ways humans generally die: heat, cold, thirst, hunger, illness, and injury. Students will be encouraged to draw on their own skill sets and backgrounds to generate solution sets for survivable futures.

Course Number: AS.191.357.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/17/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 1-4:15pm | Th- 1-4:15pm
Instructor: J. Mohorcich
Syllabus: Download (.doc)
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Savior or Saboteur? The Soldier and the African State

This course investigates the turbulent history of civil-military relations in Africa. It asks why soldiers have chosen to intervene in politics, how they have affected the development of the African state, and under what circumstances soldiers cede power. We will examine the role of Africa's armies in precipitating authoritarian rule after independence, in facilitating transitions to democracy that swept the continent after the Cold War, and how legacies of past intervention continue to shape contemporary civil-military relations on the continent.

Course Number: AS.191.366.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  W- 1-3:15pm | F- 1-3:15pm
Instructor: Nate Allen
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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China-Russia Relations in the Post-Soviet Era

This course examines the evolution of China-Russia relations since the breakup of the Soviet Union. It will examine this relationship at the global, regional, and bilateral levels, with a special focus on the role of both countries’ relations with the United States. It will also apply international relations theory in an effort to shed further light on the relationship.

Course Number: AS.191.368.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 10am-11:45am | W- 10am-11:45am | F- 10am-11:45am
Instructor: Brian Carlson
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Psychological & Brain Sciences

YesPlus - Practice of Happiness and Leadership

The Yesplus Program is an innovative life-skills training and self-development program offered to thousands of students across the country. Students gain foundational stress-management and leadership skills, develop a personal daily breathing and meditation practice, strategies for social connection, and engage in peer driven service initiatives. Yesplus introduces the SKY technique, a scientifically validated meditation practice that significantly increases one's well-being, and reduces anxiety and academic stress. The course features interactive group processes, breathing techniques, yoga, meditation and a group service project that the students will design to serve the JHU community.

Course Number: AS.200.134.12
Credits: 2
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/20/2017
Times:  Tu- 2-5:45pm | W- 2-5:45pm | Th- 2-5:45pm | F- 2-5:45pm
Instructors: Neha Goel and Annelies Richmond

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Food For Thought

What we eat influences the workings of the brain; and the brain, in turn, influences what we eat. This course explores questions at the intersection of neuroscience and nutrition: How does the brain develop? What do we "feed" a brain, and how does inadequate nutrition impact cognitive development? How does sensory perception influence dietary behaviors? How do we develop our preferences for certain foods, and how do these preferences impact nutritional status and public health?

Course Number: AS.280.229.31
Credits: 1
Distribution: N S
Days:  Monday 1/23/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 9am-12:15pm | Tu- 9am-12:15pm | Th- 9am-12:15pm | F- 9am-12:15pm
Instructors: Corbin Cunningham and Marie Spiker
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Public Health Studies

I Have my Public Health Degree, so now what???

The goal of the course is to introduce students to and enthuse them about the vast array of public health practice careers, as well as foster individual career growth and development. Case studies will be presented and discussed to highlight a range of public health professional roles and responsibilities, as well as the skills and competencies required for effective public health practice. THE COURSE WILL INCLUDE TWO ALL DAY FIELD TRIPS TO PUBLIC HEALTH AGENCIES, NON-PROFITS, PRIVATE SECTOR, AND COMMUNITY BASED ORGANIZATIONS IN D.C. AND BALTIMORE SCHEDULED FOR JAN 11 & 12. A mandatory trip meeting and resume workshop will be held in early December in the Career Center Library, Garland Hall, 3rd floor. Course/trip attendees made by faculty selection and applications will be due to the JHU Career Center on December 7 by noon. D.C. and Baltimore trip dates Jan. 11 & 12.

Course Number: AS.280.207.11
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/13/2017
Times:  M - 1-3:30pm | Tu- 1-3:30pm | W- 1-3:30pm | Th- 1-3:30pm | F- 1-3:30pm
Instructor: Katherine Henry

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Sexually Transmitted Infections

This course introduces students to an overview of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) with a focus on upstream intervention by applying the public health problem-solving paradigm. To simulate the real world, students are divided into small groups to tackle a STI problem in the community and demonstrate the mastery of public health concepts by successfully collaborating on a final paper with a descriptive analysis of an STI, its magnitude and determinants, exploration of the different intervention strategies and a defense of the intervention of choice.

Course Number: AS.280.208.12
Credits: 2
Distribution: N S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/20/2017
Times:  M - 8:30am-12:45pm | Tu- 8:30am-12:45pm | Th- 8:30am-12:45pm | F- 8:30am-12:45pm
Instructor: Kenny Mok
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Public Health and Military Policy

How do U.S. military activities affect global and domestic public health? The course will explore the perspective that specific policies governing U.S. military activities exert broad influences on the public's health, both in peace and war, and that in better understanding these influences, students will be positioned to recognize their significance in various public health settings, including international health, drug and vaccine development, and in the provision of mental healthcare to U.S. veterans.

Course Number: AS.280.213.11
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/13/2017
Times:  M - 9am-12:15pm | Tu- 9am-12:15pm | Th- 9am-12:15pm | F- 9am-12:15pm
Instructor: Remington Nevin
Syllabus: Download (.doc)
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Breaking in Baltimore: HIV & AIDS

Breaking in Baltimore is a week-long immersion experience where students explore social justice issues by engaging greater Baltimore through direct service and educational sessions. The HIV/AIDS program explores Baltimore's healthcare infrastructure and the challenges facing diagnosed and vulnerable Baltimoreans. Students will participate in classroom sessions as well as service learning projects in greater Baltimore with local agencies. Student participation begins the morning of Saturday, January 21 and runs through noon on Friday, January 27. Students must participate full-time, including living in the off-campus retreat center and participating in some evening programming. Students must apply through Center For Social Concern--applications will be live at http://studentaffairs.jhu.edu/socialconcern/programs/alternative-breaks/ by mid-October. Fee: Approx. $125

Course Number: AS.280.219.31
Credits: 2
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/17/2017 -
Times:  M - 8am-5pm | Tu- 8am-5pm | W- 8am-5pm | Th- 8am-5pm | F- 8am-5pm
Instructor: Abby Neyenhouse

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Priorities for Global Disease Surveillance....

This course will provide students with an understanding of the challenges faced by public health professionals and policy makers in their efforts to prioritize infectious diseases for surveillance, preparedness and response activities. Following a series of introductory lectures, students will participate in a simulated Emerging Infectious Disease (EID) prioritization workshop, utilizing the prioritization Tool developed by the One Health Office at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Course Number: AS.280.228.11
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/13/2017
Times:  M - 10am-12:30pm | Tu- 10am-12:30pm | W- 10am-12:30pm | Th- 10am-12:30pm | F- 10am-12:30pm
Instructor: Cassidy Rist
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Pandemics: People, Plagues, and Public Health

People and plagues have battled and sculpted each other throughout all of human history. Our very DNA has been modified by plagues, which have in turn been modified -- even eradicated -- by our greatest weapon: public health. This interdisciplinary course will examine the impact of some of the world's fiercest epidemics through the lenses of epidemiology, molecular and cellular biology, anthropology, economics, and sociology and explore the role of public health in combating these diseases.

Course Number: AS.280.230.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: N S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 1-3:45pm | Tu- 1-3:45pm | Th- 1-3:45pm
Instructor: Zoe Packman
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Introduction to Global Vaccine Policy and Programs

Vaccines are one of the most important and cost-effective tools for promoting public health. Evidence-based vaccine policies ensure that these life-saving tools deliver the best achievable impacts. This course introduces students to vaccine implementation and policy considerations in global health, with a focus on low and middle income countries (LMICs). Through lectures, in-class discussion, and a final project, students will become familiar with vaccine implementation issues, be able to identify potential factors behind those issues, critically evaluate policy solutions, and seek evidence to support their claims. This course prepares students for learning about health policy-making approaches. Prior courses in epidemiology are recommended, and prior knowledge of vaccine application and development is helpful but not required.

Course Number: AS.280.231.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/20/2017
Times:  M - 10am-12pm | Tu- 10am-12pm | Th- 10am-12pm | F- 10am-12pm
Instructor: Wenfeng Gong
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Applications of Precision Medicine in Public Health

This course will (1) introduce students to principles of precision medicine (PM) across the care continuum and (2) engage students to think critically about how PM will change the medical and public health landscape. Students will learn about the PM initiative and current examples of PM in disease prevention, diagnosis, treatment and surveillance. Students will identify challenges associated with incorporating PM into our health care system and discuss strategies to mitigate such challenges.

Course Number: AS.280.232.11
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/13/2017
Times:  M - 8:30-11am | Tu- 8:30-11am | W- 8:30-11am | Th- 8:30-11am | F- 8:30-11am
Instructors: Megan Roberts and Maryam Doroudi
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Cancer Related Health Behaviors and Disparities

This course will explore behaviors related to cancer prevention and control. Students will gain a basic understanding of cancer etiology and descriptive epidemiology. Additional topics will include primary and secondary cancer prevention strategies, drawing from recent research, including studies currently being conducted at the National Cancer Institute. Students will also learn about disparities in cancer prevention behaviors. Multiple learning formats will promote student learning and introduce different tools for behavioral cancer prevention research.

Course Number: AS.280.233.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: Q S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/20/2017
Times:  Tu- 1-3:30pm | Th- 1-3:30pm | F- 1-3:30pm
Instructors: Minal Patel and Jennifer Moss
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Mental Health and Illness in Film

Mental health and illness are of great public health importance. Movies and TV shows are how many Americans learn about mental disorders. This class will expose students to hallmark films featuring mental health issues and encourage discussion of how film and media's portrayal of mental illness influences public mental health. Students will become critical consumers of film and media in their portrayal of mental illness as they become familiar with the characteristics and symptoms of common mental illnesses.

Course Number: AS.280.234.12
Credits: 1
Distribution: N S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/20/2017
Times:  Tu- 3pm-5:15pm | W- 3pm-5:15pm | F- 3pm-5:15pm
Instructor: Jennifer Hansen
Syllabus: Download (.docx)
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Sociology

Locked Up: Sociology of the Prison Experience

Over two million Americans are sitting in jail or prison right this moment. Yet many of us can only imagine what incarceration is like through occasional news stories and popular fictional accounts. However, sociologists and criminologists have been studying life inside prison for decades. By uncovering prison's role in the lives of prisoners, we can better explore how prison operates as an institution in our society, and how prison reflects and reinforces contemporary inequality.

Course Number: AS.230.148.11
Credits: 1
Distribution: S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/13/2017
Times:  M - 9am-12:15pm | Tu- 9am-12:15pm | W- 9am-12:15pm | Th- 9am-12:15pm
Instructor: Rachel Ellis
Syllabus: Download (.pdf)
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Writing Seminars

This and That: New Cross-Genre Writing

The course will consider works that bring different genres - poetry, memoir, collage, criticism, comics, painting - together in the same book. As readers, we'll discuss issues of interpretation, and as artists, we'll discuss craft and process. Students' work in the course will culminate in a self-directed project that may take the form of a zine / pamphlet / broadside / etc. Artists we will read include Lynda Barry, Anne Carson, and Claudia Rankine, and two local artists will visit the class to perform their work and give a short talk.

Course Number: AS.220.110.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H S
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 1-2:45pm | Th- 1-2:45pm | F- 1-2:45pm
Instructor: Jessica Hudgins

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Poetry and the City

In this course, we will read and write poems that observe, critique, and imaginatively engage with urban life. Readings will include poetry by Walt Whitman, Federico Garcia Lorca, Jamaal May, Aziza Barnes and many others. We will also explore works in other genres, from nonfiction to photography to film. Off-campus events and readings from Baltimore authors will help us ground our work in the city around us.

Course Number: AS.220.111.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 10:30-12pm | Th- 10:30-12pm | F- 10:30-12pm
Instructor: John Allen

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Reading and Writing Ghost Stories

This course will investigate the literary tradition of ghost stories: what is a ghost story, how does it work, and why does it affect us so strongly? We will study a range of authors, from early practitioners like Henry James to contemporary writers like Karen Russell. We will discuss ways of analyzing the ghost story and translate our observations into techniques for our own writing. Students will write and workshop their own ghostly short stories.

Course Number: AS.220.112.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 1-2:30pm | W- 1-2:30pm | F- 1-2:30pm
Instructor: Isabella Martin

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B'More: Medicine, Art and Storytelling

In this class, we'll explore the topics of healthcare, illness, and healing through the lens of Baltimore art and literature. We'll start by exploring the emerging field of Narrative Medicine and reading personal essays, poems and fiction written by local patients and physicians. Next, we'll go on custom tours of the Baltimore Museum of Art and the American Visionary Arts museum. We'll also visit Wide Angle, a Remington nonprofit that helps heal the community by teaching local youth to tell their stories through documentary film. Students will enjoy ample opportunity to develop and receive feedback on their own personal essays, fiction, podcasts and art.

Course Number: AS.220.113.33
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/23/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 10am-4:30pm | Tu- 10am-4:30pm | W- 10am-4:30pm | Th- 10am-4:30pm | F- 10am-4:30pm
Instructor: Emily Parker

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Writing the Bible

A class exploring and reimagining the Bible through literature and creative writing. We will do close readings of select Biblical texts (examining their literary qualities rather than making theological or ideological pronouncements), especially concentrating on Genesis and the Gospels. In addition, we will read several literary works - contemporary and canonical - that engage with and complicate their Biblical source material in provocative ways. Students will respond to these readings by producing their own creative work (creation myths, poems, short stories), as well as keeping a journal. Assignments will focus on the development and exploration of point-of-view and voice. Students will also be encouraged to think about the effect of multiple voices in the telling of a single story and will produce one collaborative writing project. The class will also include a workshop component.

Course Number: AS.220.114.22
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/17/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  Tu- 1-4:15PM | Th- 1-4:15PM
Instructor: Taylor Daynes

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Seriously Funny: Humor Poetry

This course will examine how poetry can use humor to enrich our understanding of serious subjects. We will explore many subjects, from aesthetic rapture to bad love. Principal readings will range from classic examples such as Shakespeare, Dryden, and Eliot to selections from contemporary American poets, as represented in the anthology "Seriously Funny: Poems about Love, Death, Religion, Art, Politics, Sex, and Everything Else." Students will be required to write several seriously funny poems of their own. Fun is mandatory.

Course Number: AS.220.115.13
Credits: 1
Distribution: H
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 6-7:45pm | W- 6-7:45pm | Th- 6-7:45pm
Instructor: Songmuang Greer

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Writing Fantastical Fiction

While fiction is by definition not "real," some modes of fiction present deliberate departures from the world as we know it. This class will examine fantastical and non-realist writing, including surrealist and magic realist stories, as well as works with fairy-tale and folklore influences, and stories with elements of the uncanny or supernatural. Students will read and discuss representative fiction, including stories by Angela Carter, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Haruki Murakami, and Joyce Carol Oates. Students will complete weekly creative assignments, and participate in the workshop of a final, full-length piece.

Course Number: AS.220.128.13
Credits: 1
Distribution:
Days:  Monday 1/9/2017 - Friday 1/27/2017
Times:  M - 9:30 - 11:15 am | W- 9:30 - 11:15 am | Th- 9:30 - 11:15 am
Instructor: Shannon Robinson
Syllabus: Download (.doc)
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Johns Hopkins University

“. . .Courses are designed to provide you with an intensive in-class experience followed by a trip allowing you to explore the career field of choice up close.”